Portal:Physical chemistry

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Physical chemistry, is the application of physics to macroscopic, microscopic, atomic, subatomic, and particulate phenomena in chemical systems within the field of chemistry traditionally using the principles, practices and concepts of thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics and chemical kinetics. It is mostly defined as a large field of chemistry, in which several sub-concepts are applied; the inclusion of quantum mechanics is used to illustrate the application of physical chemistry to atomic and particulate chemical interaction or experimentation.

Physical chemistry is mostly referred to as a macromolecular doctrine, as the majority of the principles on which physical chemistry was founded are composed entirely of macromolecular concepts, such as colloids.

The relationships that physical chemistry tries to resolve include the effects of:

  1. Intermolecular forces on the physical properties of materials (plasticity, tensile strength, surface tension in liquids).
  2. Reaction kinetics on the rate of a reaction.
  3. The identity of ions on the electrical conductivity of materials.

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In a chemical process, chemical equilibrium is the state in which the chemical activities or concentrations of the reactants and products have no net change over time. Usually, this would be the state that results when the forward chemical process proceeds at the same rate as their reverse reaction. The reaction rates of the forward and reverse reactions are generally not zero but, being equal, there are no net changes in any of the reactant or product concentrations. This process is known as dynamic equilibrium .

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Typical thermodynamic system - heat moves from hot (boiler) to cold (condenser), (both not shown) and work is extracted, in this case by a series of pistons.

Typical thermodynamic system - heat moves from hot (boiler) to cold (condenser), (both not shown) and work is extracted, in this case by a series of pistons.

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Physical chemistry Topics

Quantum chemistry

Polymer chemistry

Thermochemistry

Thermodynamics

Phases of matter and phase transition

Electrochemistry


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