Portal:Solar System/Selected picture

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Usage[edit]

The layout design for these subpages is at Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/Layout.

  1. Add a new Selected picture to the next available subpage.
  2. Update "max=" to new total for its {{Random portal component}} on the main page.

Selected pictures list[edit]

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/1

Jupiter from Voyager 1.
Credit: Voyager 1

False-color detail of Jupiter's atmosphere, imaged by Voyager 1, showing the Great Red Spot and a passing white oval. The wavy cloud pattern to the left of the Red Spot is a region of extraordinarily complex and variable wave motion. To give a sense of Jupiter's scale, the white oval storm directly below the Great Red Spot is approximately the same diameter as Earth.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/2

Moon
Credit: Michael K. Fairbanks

The Moon is the only natural satellite of Earth. During the ancient period, it was not uncommon for cultures to believe that the Moon died each night, thus descending into the underworld. As late as the 1920s (or so), it was believed that the Moon might have a breathable atmosphere. In 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to land on the Moon.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/3

Mars
Credit: NASA

Mars, the fourth planet from the Sun, is named after the Roman god of war because of its blood red color. Mars has two small, oddly-shaped moons, Phobos and Deimos, named after the sons of the Greek god Ares. At some point in the future Phobos will be broken up by gravitational forces. The atmosphere on Mars is 95% carbon dioxide. In 2003 methane was also discovered in the atmosphere. Since methane is an unstable gas, this indicates that there must be (or have been within the last few hundred years) a source of the gas on the planet.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/4

Sunspot TRACE image
Credit: NASA/TRACE

A TRACE image of sunspots on the surface, or photosphere, of the sun from September 2002, is taken in the far ultraviolet on a relatively quiet day for solar activity. However, the image still shows a large sunspot group visible as a bright area near the horizon. Although sunspots are relatively cool regions on the surface of the sun, the bright glowing gas flowing around the sunspots have a temperature of over one million °C (1.8 million °F). The high temperatures are thought to be related to the rapidly changing magnetic field loops that channel solar plasma.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/5

Comet Hale-Bopp 29-03-1997
Credit: Philipp Salzgeber

Comet Hale-Bopp sails across the sky in the vicinity of Pazin in Istria, Croatia. To the lower right of the comet the Andromeda Galaxy is also faintly visible. The comet was visible to the naked eye for a record 18 months, twice as long as the Great Comet of 1811. At perihelion, it shone brighter than any star in the sky except Sirius, and its two tails stretched 30-40 degrees across the sky. The passage of Hale-Bopp was notable also for inciting a degree of panic about comets not seen for decades. Rumours that the comet was being followed by an alien spacecraft gained remarkable currency, and inspired a mass suicide among followers of the Heaven's Gate cult.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/6

Io moon
Credit: NASA

Io moon taken by NASA's Galileo probe. This image shows two volcanic eruptions. The one on the horizon is 140km high, the other is 75km high. Io is the innermost of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter. It is named after Io, one of Zeus's many love interests in Greek mythology.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/7

Saturn eclipse
Credit: Cassini orbiter

Saturn eclipsing the Sun, as seen by the Cassini orbiter. Individual rings seen in this image include (in order, starting from most distant): E ring, Pallene ring (visible very faintly in an arc just below Saturn), G ring, Janus/Epimetheus ring (faint), F ring (narrow brightest feature), Main rings (A,B,C), and D ring (bluish, nearest Saturn). Interior to the G ring and above the brighter main rings is the pale dot of Earth.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/8

Jupiter
Credit: Cassini probe

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and by far the largest within the solar system. It is 318 times more massive than Earth, with a diameter 11 times that of Earth, and with a volume 1300 times that of Earth. Its best known feature is the Great Red Spot, a storm larger than Earth, which was first observed by Galileo four centuries ago. This picture, taken by the Cassini orbiter was one of 26 thousand images taken of Jupiter during the course of its flyby and is the most detailed global color portrait of the planet ever produced.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/9

Earthrise, as seen by Apollo 8
Credit: William Anders

"Earthrise," the first occasion in which humans saw the Earth seemingly rising above the surface of the Moon, taken during the Apollo 8 mission on December 24, 1968. This view was seen by the crew at the beginning of its fourth orbit around the Moon, although the very first photograph taken was in black-and-white. Note that the Earth is in shadow here. A photo of a fully lit Earth would not be taken until the Apollo 17 mission.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/10

Solar eclipse of 11 August 1999
Credit: Luc Viatour

The solar eclipse of 1999 August 11, as seen from France. This was the most viewed total eclipse in human history, although some areas offered impaired visibility due to adverse weather conditions. The path of the Moon's shadow began in the Atlantic Ocean, before traversing Cornwall, northern France, southern Germany, Austria, Hungary and northern Serbia. Its maximum was in Romania, and it continued across the Black Sea, Turkey, Iran, southern Pakistan and India.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/11

Polar map of Jupiter
Credit: Cassini orbiter

This polar map of Jupiter, taken by the Cassini orbiter as it neared Jupiter during a flyby on its way to Saturn, is the most detailed global color map of the planet ever produced. The south pole is in the center of the map and the equator is at the edge. The map shows a variety of colorful cloud features, including parallel reddish-brown and white bands, the Great Red Spot, multi-lobed chaotic regions, white ovals, and many small vortexes. Many clouds appear in streaks and waves due to continual stretching and folding by Jupiter's winds and turbulence.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/12

Victoria Crater on Mars
Credit: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

Victoria Crater, an impact crater at Meridiani Planum, near the equator of Mars. The crater is approximately 800 meters (half a mile) in diameter. It has a distinctive scalloped shape to its rim, caused by erosion and downhill movement of crater wall material. Layered sedimentary rocks are exposed along the inner wall of the crater, and boulders that have fallen from the crater wall are visible on the crater floor. The floor of the crater is occupied by a striking field of sand dunes. The Mars rover Opportunity can be seen in this image, at roughly the "ten o'clock" position along the rim of the crater.

...Archive/Nominations

Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/13 [[Image:|center|300px|]]

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Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/14 [[Image:|center|300px|]]

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Portal:Solar System/Selected picture/15 [[Image:|center|300px|]]

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Nominations[edit]

Feel free to add related featured pictures to the above list. Other pictures may be nominated here.