Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture

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The layout design for these subpages is at Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/Layout.

  1. Add a new Selected picture to the next available subpage.
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  3. When an image is chosen, place {{SP Speculative fiction}} onto the image's page.

Selected pictures list

Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/1

Leaving the opera in the year 2000
Credit: Albert Robida (artist), Michel Vuijlsteke (restoration)

Leaving the opera in the year 2000, a ca. 1882 lithograph by Albert Robida, showing a futuristic view of air travel over Paris in the year 2000. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/2

1884 Macbeth poster
Credit: W.J. Morgan & Co. (lithography); Adam Cuerden (restoration)

A poster from an 1884 American production of William Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Macbeth, a tale of regicide and its aftermath. Starting anti-clockwise from top-left, we see Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches, Macbeth just after the murder of King Duncan, Banquo's ghost, and Macbeth dueling with Macduff. Over the centuries, the play has attracted some of the greatest actors in the roles of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. The play has been adapted to film, television, opera, novels, comic books, and other media. Shakespeare borrowed the story from several tales in Holinshed's Chronicles, a popular history of the British Isles, although the story itself bears no relation to the actual history of Macbeth of Scotland. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/3

Scene from The Water-Babies
Credit: Illustration: Jessie Willcox Smith; Restoration: ErikTheBikeMan

An illustration from a ca. 1916 edition of The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby, a children's novel written by the Reverend Charles Kingsley and originally serialised in 1862–63. The book, a didactic moral fable, tells the story of Tom (lower left), a young boy who drowns and is reincarnated as a "water-baby". He undergoes a series of adventures and eventually regains his human form. It was extremely popular during its day and through the 1920s, but has since fallen out of favour, perhaps due to Kingsley's expression of many of the common prejudices of that time period, such as against Americans, Jews, blacks, and Catholics, particularly the Irish. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/4

The Tempest, Act I, Scene 1
Credit: Engraving: B. Smith; Artist: George Romney; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

An engraving of action from Act I, Scene 1 from William Shakespeare's The Tempest, in which Prospero (right) has caused the ship carrying his brother Antonio and the King of Naples Alonso to run aground on the island to which he and his daughter Miranda had been exiled. The play is believed to have been written in 1610–11 and is now considered to be one of Shakespeare's greatest works. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/5

The Hunting of the Snark
Credit: Illustration: Henry Holiday; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

Plate I of Henry Holiday's original illustrations for the first edition of Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark, a nonsense poem written in 1874 that tells the story of ten individuals who cross the ocean to hunt the Snark. In common with other Carroll works, the meaning of the poem has been queried and analysed in depth. It is divided into eight "fits" (a pun on the archaic fitt meaning a part of a song, and fit meaning a convulsion) and is by far Carroll's longest poem. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/6

Zhong Kui
Credit: Artist: Okumura Masanobu; Restoration: Lise Broer

Detail from a Japanese woodblock print (ca. 1741–51) of Zhong Kui (called Shōki in Japanese), a Chinese mythological figure traditionally regarded as a vanquisher of ghosts and demons. His image is often painted on household gates as a guardian spirit, as well as in places of business where high-value goods are involved. According to folklore, Zhong Kui was a man who committed suicide after he was stripped of the title "zhuangyuan" (having achieved top honors in the imperial examinations) by the emperor of China because of his disfigured appearance, after which he became king of ghosts in Hell. The print is entitled "Shōki zu" ("Shōki striding") and measures 69 by 10 cm (27.2 by 3.9 in). (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/7

1884 poster for Hamlet
Credit: Lithography: W.J. Morgan & Co.; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

A ca. 1884 lithographed poster for an American production of William Shakespeare's Hamlet starring Thomas W. Keene. The play, believed to have been written between 1599 and 1601, recounts how Prince Hamlet exacts revenge on his uncle Claudius, who has murdered Hamlet's father, the King, and then taken the throne and married Gertrude, Hamlet's mother. Several key scenes from the play are depicted on the poster, including the initial meeting with King Hamlet's ghost (top right) and the exhuming of Yorick's skull (bottom center). (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/8

Ryū sho ten
Credit: Artist: Ogata Gekkō; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

Ryū sho ten ("Dragon rising toward heaven"), an 1897 ukiyo-e print by Ogata Gekkō showing a Japanese dragon moving upwards with Mount Fuji in the background. Dragon myths in Japanese folklore amalgamate native legends with imported stories from China, Korea and India. Most Japanese ones are water deities associated with rainfall and bodies of water, and are typically depicted as large, wingless, serpentine creatures with clawed feet. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/9

Gran calavera eléctrica
Credit: Artist: José Guadalupe Posada; Restoration: Lise Broer

Gran calavera eléctrica ("Grand electric skull", 1900–13) by José Guadalupe Posada, which depicts a large skeleton hypnotizing a group of calaveras, with an electric street car, with skeletons as passengers, in the background. Skulls are a common symbol of the Day of the Dead, a Mexican holiday where people remember friends and family members who have died. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/10

Titans and giants in Hell
Credit: Artist: Gustave Doré; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

Titans and giants imprisoned in Hell, in this engraving by Gustave Doré that accompanied Canto XXXI of an 1890 publication of Dante Alighieri's Inferno. The titan on the left is Ephialtes, a son of Poseidon. In Dante's Divine Comedy, he is one of four giants placed in the great pit that separates Dis from Cocytus, the Ninth Circle of Hell. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/11

Canto VII of Dante's Inferno
Credit: Artist: Gustave Doré; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

Gustave Doré's depiction of Canto VII of Dante's Inferno, the first part of the Divine Comedy. Here, we see the fourth circle (out of nine) of Hell, in which hoarders and wasters are forced to move around giant bags of gold, similar to the mythological story of Sisyphus. Allegorically, the Divine Comedy represents the journey of the soul towards God, with the Inferno describing the recognition and rejection of sin. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/12

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Credit: Artist: William Wallace Denslow

An illustration from the first edition of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, depicting the scene where Dorothy meets the Cowardly Lion, the first time the four major characters of the novel come together. The book was originally published in 1900 and has since been reprinted countless times, most often under the name The Wizard of Oz, which is the name of both the 1902 Broadway musical and the extremely popular, highly acclaimed 1939 film version. Thanks in part to the film it is one of the best-known stories in American popular culture and has been widely translated. Its initial success, and the success of the popular 1902 musical Baum adapted from his story, led to his writing and having published thirteen more Oz books. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/13

Robida's 20th century house
Credit: Artist: Albert Robida

A typical 20th-century aerial rotating house, as drawn by Albert Robida ca.1883. The drawing shows a dwelling structure in the scientific romance style elevated above rooftops and designed to revolve and adjust in various directions. An occupant in the lower right points to an airship with a fish-shaped balloon in the sky, while a woman rides a bucket elevator on the left. Meanwhile, children fly a kite from the balcony as a dog watches from its rooftop doghouse. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/14

Dalí Atomicus
Credit: Photo credit: Philippe Halsman

This photograph, entitled Dalí Atomicus, explores the idea of suspension, depicting three cats flying, a bucket of thrown water, and Salvador Dalí in mid air. The title of the photograph is a reference to Dalí's work Leda Atomica which can be seen in the right of the photograph behind the two cats. This is an early unretouched version where the suspension wires are still visible. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/15

Caterpillar from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Credit: Artist: Sir John Tenniel

Sir John Tenniel's illustration of the Caterpillar for Lewis Carroll's classic children's book, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The illustration is noted for its ambiguous central figure, which can be viewed as having either a human male's face with pointed nose and protruding lower lip or as the head end of an actual caterpillar, with the right three "true" legs visible. The small symbol in the lower left is composed of Tenniel's initials, which was how he signed most of his work for the book. The partially obscured word in the lower left-center is the last name of Edward Dalziel, the engraver of the piece. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/16

Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom
Credit: Artist: Ilya Repin

Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom, a painting by Ilya Repin depicting Sadko, a Russian folk hero of a bylina of the same name, though this painting depicts only one specific version of that tale. In this version, the Sea King wants Sadko to marry one of the many underwater beauties (daughters). However, if he chooses one of them he will remain under the sea forever. Instead he is supposed to pick an unremarkable servant girl -- pictured in the upper left hand side -- who will magically help him return to Novgorod and his human wife there. The story inspired both an opera and musical tableau. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/17

La Catrina
Credit: Photo credit: Tomas Castelazo

Two Catrina figurines, approximately 38 cm (15 in) tall in the City Museum of León, Guanajuato, Mexico. Popularized by José Guadalupe Posada, the Catrina is the skeleton of an upper class woman and one of the most popular figures of the Day of the Dead celebrations, which occur across two days, on November 1–2, corresponding with the Catholic holy days of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day. It has its origins in an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl, which is represented by the Catrina. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/18

1863 Santa Claus
Credit: Artist: Thomas Nast

One of the earliest depictions of the modern Santa Claus by Thomas Nast, which appeared on the cover of the January 3, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly. At this time, the image of Santa Claus had not yet merged with that of Father Christmas. This version was likely based on the Belsnickel ("Furry Nicholas"), a mythical being who visited naughty children in their sleep. The name originated from the fact that the person appeared to be a huge beast since he was covered from head to toe in fur. This image appeared as a small part of a larger illustration titled "A Christmas Furlough" in which Nast set aside his regular news and political coverage to do a Santa Claus drawing. This Santa was a man dressed up handing out gifts to Union Army soldiers. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/19

A painting depicting Ivan Tsarevich
Credit: Artist: Viktor Vasnetsov

A painting depicting Ivan Tsarevich, one of the main heroes of Russian folklore, riding a magic carpet after having captured the Firebird, which he keeps in a cage. This work was Viktor Vasnetsov's first attempt at illustrating Russian folk tales and inaugurated a famous series of paintings on the themes drawn from Russian folklore. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/20

A scene from Orlando furioso'
Credit: Artist: Gustave Doré

A scene from Orlando furioso ("Orlando the Furious"), an epic poem written by Ludovico Ariosto in 1516. It is a sequel to Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando innamorato ("Orlando in Love"), but it is quite distant from the other work in that it does not preserve the humanistic concepts of knight errantry. In this scene, Ruggierio is rescuing Angelica, a typical princess and dragon premise. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/21

A mad scientist
Credit: Artist: J.J. McCullough

A mad scientist is a stock character, often villainous, who appears in fiction as a scientist who is insane or eccentric. He is usually working with some utterly fictional technology in order to forward his evil schemes. Recent mad scientist depictions are often satirical and humorous, and some are actually protagonists, such as Dexter in the cartoon series Dexter's Laboratory. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/22

The Wicked Witch of The West, melting after being doused by Dorothy. From the first edition of The Wizard of Oz.
Credit: Illustrator: W. W. Denslow; Restoration: Lise Broer

Dorothy (left) douses the Wicked Witch of the West with water, melting her, in this illustration from the first edition of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. The appearance of the witch in the 1939 film adaptation of the novel has become an archetype for human wickedness. This film is the source of the oft-quoted phrase, "I'll get you, my pretty ... and your little dog too!" The unique Broadway musical, Wicked, The Untold Story Of the Witches of Oz, tells of The Wicked Witch of the West, the Tin Man, The Cowardly Lion, The Scarecrow, and Glinda's shared history. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/23

Fifth of Henry Holiday's original illustrations to "The Hunting of the Snark" by Lewis Carroll.
Credit: Illustrator: Henry Holiday; Retouched by Adam Cuerden

The fifth of Henry Holiday's original illustrations for "The Hunting of the Snark", a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll in 1874. (CPOTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/24

"The Punishment of Loki", by Louis Huard.
Credit: Illustrator: Louis Huard (1813-1874); Retouched by Adam Cuerden.

"The Punishment of Loki", by Louis Huard. (CPOTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/25

An artist's impression of a terraformed Mars centered over Valles Marineris. The Tharsis region can be seen of the left side of the globe.
Credit: Daein Ballard

An artist's impression of a terraformed Mars centered over Valles Marineris. The Tharsis region can be seen on the left side of the globe. (CPOTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/26

Depiction of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote character by Gustave Doré.
Credit: Illustrator: Gustave Doré; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

Don Quixote and his fanciful reality, a "world of disorderly notions, picked out of his books, crowded into his imagination". (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/27

A Midsummer Night's Dream Act IV, scene i
Credit: Artist: Henry Fuseli; Engraver: J.P. Simon
Restoration: Lise Broer

An engraving of William Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream, depicting Titania and Bottom, with fairies in attendance. The play portrays the events surrounding the marriage of Theseus and Hippolyta, both figures of Greek mythology, and the actions of fairies who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set. It is one of Shakespeare's most popular works for the stage and is still widely performed today. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/28

Thor and Útgarða-Loki
Credit: Artist: Louis Huard; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

A 1900 illustration of the Norse god Thor with the giant Útgarða-Loki. Giving his name as "Skrymir", the giant tricked Thor and his companions in several ways, such as challenging Thor's servant Þjálfi to a race against Thought, challenging Loki in an eating contest with Wildfire, and challenging Thor to a drinking contest where the drinking horn was connected to the ocean. In the end, Útgarða-Loki revealed his trickery and said that he had been truly afraid at their performance and would never again risk coming near the thunder god. Thor's dealings with giants make up most of the myths surrounding him. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/29

King Midas with his daughter, whom he has just turned into gold, from A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Credit: Artist: Walter Crane; Restoration: Lise Broer

An illustration from an 1893 version of A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys by Nathaniel Hawthorne, which recounted the tale of King Midas. In Greek mythology, Midas was given ability to turn everything he touched into gold by the god Bacchus. However, he soon discovered that he was unable to even eat. Bacchus told him to wash in the river Pactolus, and the power flowed in the river, which was supposedly the reason for why the river was so rich in gold in later years. In Hawthorne's version, Midas' touch even turned his daughter to gold (pictured here). (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/30

An illustration by Édouard Manet for a French publication of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven"
Credit: Artist: Édouard Manet; Restoration: Lise Broer

An illustration by Édouard Manet for a French publication of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven". In the poem, the raven flies into the narrator's home and perches on a bust of Pallas Athena (seen here). The narrator then asks the bird a series of questions, to which the bird only replies, "Nevermore". Eventually, the narrator falls into despair and ends with his final admission that his soul is trapped beneath the raven's shadow and shall be lifted "Nevermore". Originally published in 1845, the poem was widely popular and made Poe famous, though it did not bring him much financial success. "The Raven" has influenced many modern works and is referenced throughout popular culture in films, television, music and more. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/31

An illustration by Kate Greenaway that accompanied Robert Browning's version of the Pied Piper of Hamelin.
Credit: Artist: Kate Greenaway; Restoration: Lise Broer

An illustration by Kate Greenaway that accompanied Robert Browning's version of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, a legend wherein a piper is hired by the town of Hamelin, Germany, to lead rats away with his magic pipe. The town refuses to pay his wages and he retaliates by leading the children of the town away as well. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/32

"The Man That Pleased None", from Walter Crane's 1887 illustrated book The Baby's Own Aesop, a collection of Aesop's Fables retold in limerick format.
Credit: Restoration: Lise Broer

"The Man That Pleased None", from Walter Crane's 1887 illustrated book The Baby's Own Aesop, a collection of Aesop's Fables retold in limerick format. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece between 620 and 560 BCE, and his fables are some of the most well known in the world, remaining a popular choice for moral education of children today. Crane, a member of the Arts and Crafts movement, popularised the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterise many nursery rhymes and children's stories for decades to come. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/33

In the poem "The Queen of Hearts", the titular queen bakes some tarts, which are then stolen by the Knave of Hearts (shown here).
Credit: Artist: W. W. Denslow; Restoration: Lise Broer

In the poem "The Queen of Hearts", the titular queen bakes some tarts, which are then stolen by the Knave of Hearts (shown here). The King of Hearts has the Knave punished, so he brings them back and pledges not to steal again. The poem was published anonymously in 1782, along with three lesser-known stanzas, all about characters based on playing cards. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/34

Three Little Pigs, by Leonard Leslie Brooke
Credit: Original art by Leonard Leslie Brooke. Edited by Jujutacular

Illustration for a 1904 adaptation of the Three Little Pigs fairy tale, depicting the big bad wolf blowing down the straw house of the first little pig.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/35

An illustration of the transformation of Dr. Jekyll into the hideous Mr. Hyde.
Credit: Original by National Prtg. & Engr. Co. Retouched by Papa Lima Whiskey.

An 1880s poster for Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, a novella by Robert Louis Stevenson known for its vivid portrayal of a split personality, wherein within the same person there is both an apparently good and an evil personality, quite distinct from each other. It was a huge success, with over 40,000 copies sold in the first six months after publication. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/36

"He met with a severe fall" from Wallace Goldsmith's illustrations to Oscar Wilde's The Canterville Ghost.
Credit: Artist: Wallace Goldsmith; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

A scene from "The Canterville Ghost", Oscar Wilde's first published story, which is about an American family that moves into a haunted house in England. However, instead of being frightened of the eponymous ghost, they turn the tables and prank him, such as in this scene, where the twin boys have set up a butter-slide, causing the ghost to slip down the staircase. The story satirises both the unrefined tastes of Americans and the determination of the British to guard their traditions. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/37

William Wallace Denslow's illustration of the poem "The Queen of Hearts" from a 1901 issue of Mother Goose.
Credit: Illustration: William Wallace Denslow. Restoration: Lise Broer

William Wallace Denslow's illustration of the poem "The Queen of Hearts" from a 1901 issue of Mother Goose. The poem was originally published in 1782 as part of a set of four playing card based poems, but proved to be far more popular than the others. By 1785 it had been set to music, and it forms the basis of the plot of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, Chapter XI: "Who Stole the Tarts?" Although it was originally published in a magazine for adults, it is now best known as a nursery rhyme. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/38

Seventh of Henry Holiday's original illustrations to "The Hunting of the Snark" by Lewis Carroll.
Credit: Illustrations: Henry Holiday (1839-1927). Retouched by Adam Cuerden.

Seventh of Henry Holiday's original illustrations to "The Hunting of the Snark" by Lewis Carroll.

From Fit the Fifth: The Beaver's Lesson. The Butcher and Beaver hear the song of the Jubjub bird, and this causes the Butcher to be reminded of his childhood, and begin a lengthy lesson to he Beaver. Afterwards, they become friends. As for the strange creatures:

The Beaver brought paper, portfolio, pens,
    And ink in unfailing supplies:
While strange creepy creatures came out of their dens,
    And watched them with wondering eyes.
 
So engrossed was the Butcher, the heeded them not,
    As he wrote with a pen in each hand,
And explained all the while in a popular style
    Which the Beaver could well understand.

The rest of the lesson is pretty much complete nonsense.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/39

"Mrs. Bedonebyasyoudid." Illustration from Charles Kingsley's The Water Babies in charcoal, water, and oil.
Credit: Artist: Jessie Willcox Smith. Retouched by ErikTheBikeMan.

"Mrs. Bedonebyasyoudid." Illustration from Charles Kingsley's The Water Babies in charcoal, water, and oil.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/40

The giant Suttungr threatens some dwarves, in this scene from Norse mythology.
Credit: Artist: Louis Huard; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

The giant Suttungr threatens some dwarves, in this scene from Norse mythology. In the story, the dwarf brothers Fjalar and Galar had murdered Suttungr's parents. The giant captured the two, as well as some other dwarves, and placed them on a rock that would be submerged by the tide (shown here). The dwarves begged for Suttungr to spare their lives and offered him the magical mead of poetry, which would allow whoever drinks it to have the ability to recite any information and solve any question. The mead was then stolen by Odin and given to the gods and to men gifted in poetry. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/41

Scene from The Wicked World
Credit: Artist: D. H. Friston; Restoration: Adam Cuerden.

The climactic scene from Act III of The Wicked World (1873), a blank verse play by W. S. Gilbert about how female fairies cope with a sudden introduction to them of men and "mortal love". This is one of several "fairy comedies" by Gilbert, and it established him as a writer of wide range, propelling him beyond the burlesques he had produced in his early career, and leading towards his famous Savoy operas. (POTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/42

Credit: Creators: Winsor McCay, John McCay, John Fitzsimmons.

The Centaurs was an animated film produced by Winsor McCay between 1918 and 1921. There is no record that the film was completed or publicly screened. The film was destroyed by negligent storage that allowed the sole surviving nitrate film print to deteriorate into dust. All that remains are isolated fragments that total approximately 90 seconds.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/43

Credit: Animation by Winsor McCay.

Gertie the Dinosaur is a 1914 American animated short film by Winsor McCay. Although not the first animated film, as is sometimes thought, it was the first cartoon to feature a character with an appealing personality. The film was also the first to be created using keyframe animation. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry, and was named #6 of The 50 Greatest Cartoons of all time in a 1994 survey of animators and cartoon historians by Jerry Beck. (MOTD)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/44

Credit: Director: Thomas Edison.

Thomas Edison's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus, 1910.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/45

Credit: Filmed by ahremsee.

The Tenth Doctor (David Tennant) during the filming of one scene for the 2009 Christmas Special, The End of Time.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/46

Credit: Animator: Pat Sullivan.

Feline Follies, a Felix the Cat 1919 silent animated short by Pat Sullivan.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/47

Stained glass window from the synagogue in Enschede, depicting a griffin. Text is a shortened version of "Blessed are those who listen to me; watching daily at my doors; waiting at my doorway." (Proverbs 8:34)
Credit: Kleuske (photo, description), stained glass artist unknown

Stained glass window from the synagogue in Enschede, depicting a griffin. Text is a shortened version of "Blessed are those who listen to me; watching daily at my doors; waiting at my doorway." (Proverbs 8:34)

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/48

Illustration to Tennyson's "Sleeping Beauty" by W. E. F. Britten.  Like a lot of Tennyson poems based on a literary source, Tennyson only focuses on a tiny part of the whole.  Hence, the poem leaves out all the setup and the conclusion, instead describing what her sleep was like
Credit: William Edward Frank Britten (artist), Tennyson (poem), Adam Cuerden (restoration, image description)

Illustration to Tennyson's "Sleeping Beauty" by W. E. F. Britten. Like a lot of Tennyson poems based on a literary source, Tennyson only focuses on a tiny part of the whole. Hence, the poem leaves out all the setup and the conclusion, instead describing what her sleep was like:

Year after year unto her feet,
She lying on her couch alone,
Across the purpled coverlet,
The maiden's jet-black hair has grown,
On either side her tranced form
Forth streaming from a braid of pearl:
The slumbrous light is rich and warm,
And moves not on the rounded curl.
 
The silk star-broider'd coverlid
Unto her limbs itself doth mould
Languidly ever; and, amid
Her full black ringlets downward roll'd,
Glows forth each softly-shadow'd arm,
With bracelets of the diamond bright:
Her constant beauty doth inform
Stillness with love, and day with light.
 
She sleeps: her breathings are not heard
In palace chambers far apart.
The fragrant tresses are not stirr'd
That lie upon her charmed heart.
She sleeps: on either hand upswells
The gold-fringed pillow lightly prest:
She sleeps, nor dreams, but ever dwells
A perfect form in perfect rest.
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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/49

Film poster for the 1932 film The Mummy.
Credit: Employee(s) of Universal Pictures, attributed to Karoly Grosz. Crisco 1492 (uploader).

Film poster for the 1932 film The Mummy, featuring Boris Karloff.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/50

Illustration to Tennyson's "Sir Galahad" by W. E. F. Britten.
Credit: William Edward Frank Britten (illustration), Tennyson (poem), Adam Cuerden (restoration)

Illustration to Tennyson's "Sir Galahad" by W. E. F. Britten:

My good blade carves the casques of men,
    My tough lance thrusteth sure,
My strength is as the strength of ten,
    Because my heart is pure.
The shattering trumpet shrilleth high,
    The hard brands shiver on the steel,
The splinter'd spear-shafts crack and fly,
    The horse and rider reel:
They reel, they roll in clanging lists,
    And when the tide of combat stands,
Perfume and flowers fall in showers,
    That lightly rain from ladies' hands.
   
How sweet are looks that ladies bend
    On whom their favours fall!
For them I battle till the end,
    To save from shame and thrall:
But all my heart is drawn above,
    My knees are bow'd in crypt and shrine:
I never felt the kiss of love,
    Nor maiden's hand in mine.
More bounteous aspects on me beam,
    Me mightier transports move and thrill;
So keep I fair thro' faith and prayer
    A virgin heart in work and will.
   
When down the stormy crescent goes,
    A light before me swims,
Between dark stems the forest glows,
    I hear a noise of hymns:
Then by some secret shrine I ride;
    I hear a voice but none are there;
The stalls are void, the doors are wide,
    The tapers burning fair.
Fair gleams the snowy altar-cloth,
    The silver vessels sparkle clean,
The shrill bell rings, the censer swings,
    And solemn chaunts resound between.
   
Sometime on lonely mountain-meres
    I find a magic bark;
I leap on board: no helmsman steers:
    I float till all is dark.
A gentle sound, an awful light!
    Three angels bear the holy Grail:
With folded feet, in stoles of white,
    On sleeping wings they sail.
Ah, blessed vision! blood of God!
    My spirit beats her mortal bars,
As down dark tides the glory slides,
    And star-like mingles with the stars.
   
When on my goodly charger borne
    Thro' dreaming towns I go,
The cock crows ere the Christmas morn,
    The streets are dumb with snow.
The tempest crackles on the leads,
    And, ringing, springs from brand and mail;
But o'er the dark a glory spreads,
    And gilds the driving hail.
I leave the plain, I climb the height;

    No branchy thicket shelter yields;

But blessed forms in whistling storms
    Fly o'er waste fens and windy fields.
   
A maiden knight--to me is given
    Such hope, I know not fear;
I yearn to breathe the airs of heaven
    That often meet me here.
I muse on joy that will not cease,
    Pure spaces clothed in living beams,
Pure lilies of eternal peace,
    Whose odours haunt my dreams;
And, stricken by an angel's hand,
    This mortal armour that I wear,
This weight and size, this heart and eyes,
    Are touch'd, are turn'd to finest air.
   
The clouds are broken in the sky,
    And thro' the mountain-walls
A rolling organ-harmony
    Swells up, and shakes and falls.
Then move the trees, the copses nod,
    Wings flutter, voices hover clear:
"O just and faithful knight of God!
    Ride on! the prize is near."
So pass I hostel, hall, and grange;
    By bridge and ford, by park and pale,
All-arm'd I ride, whate'er betide,
    Until I find the holy Grail.
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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/51

Illustration to Tennyson's "The Lady of Shalott" by W. E. F. Britten.
Credit: William Edward Frank Britten (illustration), Tennyson (poem), Adam Cuerden (restoration)

Illustration to Tennyson's "The Lady of Shalott" by W. E. F. Britten:

And by the moon the reaper weary,
Piling sheaves in uplands airy,
Listening, whispers, " 'Tis the fairy
Lady of Shalott."
She knows not what the curse may be,
And so she weaveth steadily,
And little other care hath she,
The Lady of Shalott.
All in the blue unclouded weather
Thick-jewell'd shone the saddle-leather,
The helmet and the helmet-feather
Burn'd like one burning flame together,
As he rode down to Camelot.
Out flew the web and floated wide-
The mirror crack'd from side to side;
"The curse is come upon me," cried
The Lady of Shalott.
"Who is this? And what is here?"
And in the lighted palace near
Died the sound of royal cheer;
And they crossed themselves for fear,
All the Knights at Camelot;
But Lancelot mused a little space
He said, "She has a lovely face;
God in his mercy lend her grace,
The Lady of Shalott."
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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/52

Cover of a 1904 adaptation of Humpty Dumpty by William Wallace Denslow.
Credit: William Wallace Denslow (illustration), Jujutacular (restoration)

Cover of a 1904 adaptation of Humpty Dumpty by William Wallace Denslow.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/53

Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven". Part 4 of 4 full page plates (two smaller illustrations at beginning and end omitted).
Credit: Édouard Manet (illustration), Durova and Adam Cuerden (restoration)

Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven". Part 4 of 4 full page plates.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/54

Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven". Part 2 of 4 full page plates.
Credit: Édouard Manet (illustration), Durova (restoration)

Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven". Part 2 of 4 full page plates.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/55

Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven". Part 1 of 4 full page plates (two smaller illustrations at beginning and end omitted).
Credit: Édouard Manet (illustration), Durova (restoration)

Illustration by Édouard Manet for a French translation by Stéphane Mallarmé of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven". Part 1 of 4 full page plates.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/56

Frontispiece to the 1825/1826 edition of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage by Lord Byron, published by W. Dugdale, Russell Court, Drury Lane. The engraving is by I. H. Jones.
Credit: I. H. Jones (illustration), Adam Cuerden (restoration)

Frontispiece to the 1825/1826 edition of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage by Lord Byron, published by W. Dugdale, Russell Court, Drury Lane. The engraving is by I. H. Jones.

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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/57

Fourth of Henry Holiday's original illustrations to "The Hunting of the Snark" by Lewis Carroll.
Credit: Henry Holiday (illustration), Adam Cuerden (restoration)

Fourth of Henry Holiday's original illustrations to "The Hunting of the Snark" by Lewis Carroll.


From Fit the Second: The Bellman's Speech. This shows the Bellman's map, which, being blank, is equally useful everywhere, unlike normal maps:

"Other maps are such shapes, with their islands and capes!
    But we've got our brave Captain to thank"
(So the crew would protest) "that he's brought us the best--
    A perfect and absolute blank!"
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Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/58 Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/58


Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/59 Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/59


Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/60 Portal:Speculative fiction/Selected picture/60


Nominations

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