Portal:Superhero fiction

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Superhero fiction is a genre of fiction featuring characters "of unprecedented physical prowess dedicated to acts of derring-do in the public interest". It examines the adventures of costumed crime fighters known as superheroes, who often possess superhuman powers and battle similarly powered criminals known as supervillains.

Under the umbrella of speculative fiction, superhero fiction can be combined into hybrid genres by introducing elements from other forms of fiction, such as science, horror, fantasy, alternate history, supernatural, adventure, western, romance, and crime fiction. This is accomplished by situating superhero narrative elements within the context of a wider, genre themed setting.

The superhero genre has launched the careers of many successful writers and artists, who have in turn influenced the development of the genre through their contributions. Many other artists, such as actors and musicians, have also had their own work influenced by stories of superheroes.

Since the 1938 debut of Superman, stories of superheroes—ranging from brief, standalone adventures, to serials written over several years—have dominated American comic books. In the decades that have followed, it has crossed international and social boundaries, influencing and interacting with other cultures, and has been translated from superhero comics into other forms of media, including film, animation, television, and video games.

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Society is rotten. It will only be changed when the people see the greed, arrogance and brutality of those who rule them!

Anarky dialogue by Alan Grant,
"Anarky", The Batman Adventures No. 31, April 1995.
Anarky is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. Co-created by Alan Grant and Norm Breyfogle, he first appeared in Detective Comics #608 (November 1989) as an adversary of Batman. Lonnie Machin is introduced as a child prodigy with knowledge of social and political philosophy who, witnessing social injustice, becomes Anarky to improve society through the overthrow of all government. Named after the philosophy of anarchism, the primary philosophical element that has underscored the character's appearances has been anti-statism. Highly thematic and philosophical in tone, multiple social issues have been addressed in stories featuring the character, including environmentalism, antimilitarism, economic exploitation, and political corruption. Inspired by multiple sources, early stories to feature the character often included homages to political and philosophical books. (read more...)

Selected storyline


"Pride & Joy" is a six-issue story arc from the comic book series Runaways (vol. 1), published in issues one through six in 2003 by Marvel Comics' imprint Tsunami, which was created to attract young readers. It was written by Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Adrian Alphona. While it was initially intended to be a six-part miniseries, the popularity of "Pride & Joy" and new ideas from writer Vaughan allowed Runaways to grow into a regular monthly Marvel title. "Pride & Joy" has subsequently won several comics awards, including the 2006 Harvey Award for Best Continuing or Limited Series.

The story arc has been critically acclaimed for its simple story set in the typically complex Marvel Universe. The story arc's primary purpose was to introduce the main characters, six children who discover their parents are evil after seeing them murder a girl in a sacrificial ceremony. It centers upon the children's relationships with their parents as the children learn that they themselves have inherited their parents' powers. Once The Pride realizes their offspring have disappeared, they begin to use their considerable influence to track down their sons and daughters. "Pride & Joy" sets up the main concept of the series, which involves children versus their parents. (read more...)

Selected article


"[Watchmen] was considered too dark, too complex, too 'smart'. But the world has changed [after the September 11, 2001 attacks]. I think that the new global climate has finally caught up with the vision that Alan Moore had in 1986. It is the perfect time to make this movie."

David Hayter, in October 2001, on the project's timing[1]
The production of the Watchmen film based on the original twelve-issue comic book limited series of same name was a decades-long process. The original comic book series created by writer Alan Moore, artist Dave Gibbons, and colorist John Higgins, was published by DC Comics between 1986 and 1987. The production process for the film consisted of several false starts and changes in the owners of the film rights, and eventually culminated in the 2009 film. The graphic novel's film rights were acquired by producer Lawrence Gordon in 1986. Many problems halted the adaptation's development, with four different studios and various directors and screenwriters being attached to the project through twenty years. In 2006, Zack Snyder, who at the time was filming another comic book adaptation, 300, was hired by Warner Bros. to helm Watchmen. Filming started in 2007, and following deals with two of the previous companies involved in the development—Paramount Pictures, responsible for international distribution rights, and 20th Century Fox, which received the right to part of the gross—the Watchmen adaptation was finally released on March 2009. (read more...)

Selected biography


Alfonso "Al" Williamson(March 21, 1931 – June 12, 2010) was an American cartoonist, comic book artist and illustrator specializing in adventure, Western and science-fiction/fantasy. From the mid-1980s to 2003, he was primarily active as an inker, mainly on Marvel Comics superhero titles starring such characters as Daredevil, Spider-Man, and Spider-Girl.

Williamson is known for his collaborations with a group of artists including Frank Frazetta, Roy Krenkel, Angelo Torres, and George Woodbridge, which was affectionately known as the "Fleagle Gang". Williamson has been cited as a stylistic influence on a number of younger artists, and encouraged many, helping such newcomers as Berni Wrightson and Mike Kaluta break into the business. He has won several industry awards, and six career-retrospective books about him have been published since 1998. Living in Pennsylvania with his wife Corina, Williamson retired in his seventies. (read more...)

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Featured Articles: Featured article Anarky, Featured article Aquaman (TV program), Featured article Batman, Featured article Batman: Arkham Asylum, Featured article Batman: Arkham City, Featured article Interactions (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Featured article Pilot (Smallville), Featured article Sinestro Corps War, Featured article Smallville (season 1), Featured article Superman in film, Featured article Watchmen

Featured Lists: Featured article List of accolades received by the Spider-Man film series, Featured article List of Marvel Cinematic Universe film actors, Featured article List of Smallville episodes, Featured article List of X-Men video games

Featured topics: Featured article Characters of Smallville, Featured article Smallville (season 1)

Good Articles: Anole (comics), The Amazing Spider-Man (2012 film), The Avengers (2012 film), Barbara Gordon, Batman (1989 film), Batgirl, Batman & Robin (film), Batman Begins, Batman Forever, Batman Returns, Batman in film, Batman: Anarky, Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, Batman: The Dark Knight (roller coaster), Batman: The Ride, Batman: The Ultimate Evil Batwoman, Bizarro (Six Flags New England), Captain America: The First Avenger, Catalysts (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Characters of Smallville, Chloe Sullivan, Clark Kent (Smallville), Competition (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Daredevil (film), The Dark Knight (film), The Dark Knight Rises, The Dark Saga, Democracy (Judge Dredd storyline), Dominator (roller coaster), Dredd, Enemies & Allies, Fantastic Four in film, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Green Lantern (film), Green Lantern (Six Flags Great Adventure), Green Lantern Coaster, Hulk (film), The Incredibles, The Incredible Hulk (film), The Invisible Hand (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Iron Man (film), Iron Man 2, Justice League (Smallville), Justice League: Alien Invasion 3D, Lana Lang (Smallville), Lex Luthor (Smallville), Lionel Luthor, Lois Lane (Smallville), Man of Steel (film), Market Forces (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Marvel 1602, Marvel Trading Card Game, Mortal Kombat vs. DC Universe, Natural Selection (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Pride & Joy (comics), Production of Watchmen, The Powerpuff Girls, The Riddler's Revenge, The Rocketeer (film), Reaction (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Reckoning (Smallville), Silver Age of Comic Books, Smallville, Soon I Will Be Invincible, Spider-Man, Spider-Man (2002 film), Spider-Man (Miles Morales), Spider-Man 3, Spider-Man in film, Spider-Man: One More Day, Superman (film), Superman Returns, Superman: Escape from Krypton, Superman: Krypton Coaster, Superman: Ultimate Flight, Survival of the Fittest (The Spectacular Spider-Man), Tempest (Smallville), Thor (film), Unbreakable (film), The Uncertainty Principle (The Spectacular Spider-Man), V for Vendetta (film), Wanted (2008 film), Watchmen (film), Al Williamson, X-Men (film series), X-Men (film), X-Men Legends, X-Men Legends II: Rise of Apocalypse, X-Men: First Class, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, X2 (film)

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  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference watches was invoked but never defined (see the help page).