Portal:Yoruba

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Yoruba

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The Yoruba (Yorùbá in Yoruba orthography) are a large ethno-linguistic group or ethnic nation in Africa; the majority of them speak the Yoruba language (èdèe Yorùbá; èdè = language). The Yoruba constitute approximately 21 percent of Nigeria's total population, and around 30 million individuals throughout the region of West Africa. They share borders with the Borgu (variously called Bariba and Borgawa) in the northwest, the Nupe and Ebira in the north, the Ẹsan Afemai and Edo to the southeast, the Igala and other related groups to the northeast, and the Egun, Fon, and other Gbe-speaking peoples in the southwest. While the majority of the Yoruba live in western Nigeria, there are also substantial indigenous Yoruba communities in Benin, Ghana and Togo. The Yoruba are the main ethnic group in the states of Ekiti, Lagos, Ogun, Ondo, Osun, and Oyo, which are subdivisions of Nigeria; they also constitute a sizable proportion of Kwara and Kogi states as well as Edo.

Yoruba culture is celebrated across the world such as in the form of the historical connection to communities in Brazil, Cuba, Umbanda, USA and elsewhere.

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The Oyo Empire (c. 1400 - 1835) was a West African empire of what is today western Nigeria. The empire was established by the Yoruba in the 15th century and grew to become one of the largest West African states encountered by colonial explorers. It rose to preeminence through wealth gained from trade and its possession of a powerful cavalry. The Oyo Empire was the most politically important state in the region from the mid-17th to the late 18th century, holding sway not only over other Yoruba states, but also over the Fon kingdom of Dahomey (located in the state now known as the Republic of Benin).

Selected biography

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Fela Anikulapo Kuti (born Olufela Olusegun Oludotun Ransome-Kuti, October 15, 1938 - August 2, 1997), or simply Fela, was a Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, pioneer of Afrobeat music, human rights activist, and political maverick.

HMV ranked him #46 on a list of the top 100 most influential musicians of the 20th century.

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The Yoruba are a multinational ethnic group, with an estimated population of more than 40 million in Nigeria, Benin Republic, Togo, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, Trinidad, Jamaica and other countries.

Yoruba religious, musical and culinary traditions are amongst the most well-known cultural patrimonies in the world. Yoruba culture has contributed foundational elements including the Orisa, Candomble and Santeria religious faiths, Juju music, Afrobeat, samba, salsa, afoxe and Latin music, and foods including akara, amala and Moimoi to West African, Caribbean and Latin American cultures.

The celebrated Ife Bronze and Terracotta, one of Africa's best-known sculptural traditions, were produced in the ancient Yoruba city-state of Ile-Ife between 1000-1400 AD.

Africa's first Anglican bishop, Samuel Ajayi Crowther, was a Yoruba man of Oyo[disambiguation needed] and Ketu[disambiguation needed] parentage. He received his doctorate in divinity from Oxford University in 1864.

The founder of Nigeria's first political party was a Yoruba man named Herbert Macauley.

Wole Soyinka, the first African to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, is a Yoruba man.

The first museum to be established in Nigeria is in Esie, Kwara State.

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