Post-bop

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Post-bop
Stylistic origins Jazz, bebop, hard bop, modal jazz, avant-garde jazz, free jazz, impressionist music
Cultural origins early 1960s New York City
Typical instruments Drums, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, clarinet, piano, double bass

Post-bop is a form of small-combo jazz music that evolved in the early-to-mid sixties.

Definition[edit]

Generally, the term post-bop is taken to mean jazz from the mid-sixties onward that assimilates influence from hard bop, modal jazz, the avant-garde, and free jazz, without necessarily being immediately identifiable as any of the above. The term is a fairly recent coinage and (like "Northern soul") was not in common use while the genre was active.[citation needed]

According to musicologist Jeremy Yudkin, post-bop did not follow "the conventions of bop or the apparently formless freedom of the new jazz".[1] He wrote in his definition of the subgenre:

Forms, tempos, and meters are freer, all the compositions are new, and the band members themselves are featured composers ... [A]n approach that is abstract and intense in the extreme, with space created for rhythmic and coloristic independence of the drummer—an approach that incorporated modal and chordal harmonies, flexible form, structured choruses, melodic variation, and free improvisation."[1]

History[edit]

Miles Davis' second quintet was active during 1965 to 1968 and featured pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, saxophonist Wayne Shorter, and drummer Tony Williams. They recorded six studio albums that, according to All About Jazz's C. Michael Bailey, introduced post-bop: E.S.P. (1965), Miles Smiles (1967), Sorcerer (1967), Nefertiti (1968), Miles in the Sky (1968), and Filles de Kilimanjaro (1968).[1]

Much "post-bop" was recorded on Blue Note Records. Key albums include Speak No Evil by Wayne Shorter; The Real McCoy by McCoy Tyner; Out to Lunch by Eric Dolphy; Miles Smiles by Miles Davis; Maiden Voyage by Herbie Hancock; and Search for the New Land by Lee Morgan (an artist not typically associated with the post-bop genre). Most post-bop artists worked in other genres as well, with a particularly strong overlap with later hard bop.

By the early seventies, most of the major post-bop artists had moved on to jazz fusion of one form or another.[citation needed]

Associated musicians[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bailey, C. Michael (April 11, 2008). "Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop". All About Jazz. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 

External links[edit]