Potez IX

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Potez IX
Role Airliner
National origin France
Manufacturer Potez
First flight 1921
Number built 30
Developed from SEA IV

The Potez IX was an early airliner produced in France in the 1920s, a further development of the SEA IV that Henry Potez had co-designed during the First World War.[1][2] The design mated an entirely new fuselage to the wing and tail structures of the earlier military aircraft.[1][2][3] This fuselage was very deep, nearly filling the interplane gap, and carried within it a fully enclosed cabin with seating for four passengers.[1][2][3] The nose area was carefully streamlined[2] with curved aluminium,[4] but other aspects of the construction were conventional for the day; wooden structures skinned in plywood (the passenger cabin) or fabric (the rest of the aircraft).[5] The pilot sat in an open cockpit aft of the cabin.[2][5]

The prototype flew in 1921 and was followed by around thirty production examples that differed from it in having a larger tail fin and rudder.[2] The Franco-Roumanian Aviation Company flew these[5] on routes linking Paris to London,[1] Strasburg,[5] Prague,[5] Warsaw,[1] and Budapest[1] until 1928.[1]

The Potez IX S, a one-off modified version with wings of larger area,[2] flew in the Grand Prix de l'Aéro Club de France in June 1921 with Gustave Douchy at the controls.[6] Douchy was disqualified in the third stage of the competition.[6]


Specifications[edit]

Data from "The Paris Aero Show 1921" 15 December 1921, p.842

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Capacity: 4 passengers
  • Length: 9.80 m (32 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.00 m (46 ft 0 in)
  • Height: 13.12 m (10 ft 3 in)
  • Wing area: 46.0 m2 (495 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 1,250 kg (2,750 lb)
  • Gross weight: 2,050 kg (2,511 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lorraine-Dietrich 12Da, 280 kW (370 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 200 km/h (125 mph)
  • Service ceiling: 6,100 m (20,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 4.2 m/s (820 ft/min)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Taylor 1989, p.747
  2. ^ a b c d e f g The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft, p.2760
  3. ^ a b "The Paris Aero Show 1921" 15 December 1921, p.841
  4. ^ "The Paris Aero Show 1921" 17 November 1921, p.764
  5. ^ a b c d e "The Paris Aero Show 1921" 15 December 1921, p.842
  6. ^ a b "The French Aero Club Grand Prix", p.430

References[edit]