Poti-class corvette

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Bditelni1987.jpg
Bulgarian Navy Poti class corvette Bditelni in 1987
Class overview
Operators:  Soviet Navy
 Bulgarian Navy
 Romanian Naval Forces
Preceded by: Kronshtadt class submarine chaser
Succeeded by: Pauk class corvette
General characteristics
Type: Anti-submarine corvette
Displacement: 500 long tons (508 t) standard, 580 long tons (589 t) full load
Length: 59.4 m (195 ft)
Beam: 7.9 m (25 ft 11 in)
Draught: 2.0 m (6 ft 7 in)
Propulsion: 2 shaft CODAG, 2 gas turbines 30,000 shp (22,371 kW) & 2 M503A diesels 8,000 shp (5,966 kW)
Speed: 38 knots
Range: 4,500 nautical miles (8,334 km; 5,179 mi) at 10 kn (18.5 km/h; 11.5 mph), 520 nautical miles (963 km; 598 mi) at 37 kn (68.5 km/h; 42.6 mph),
Complement: 80
Sensors and
processing systems:
  • Radar: Strut curve, Muff comb, Spin trough
  • Sonar: High frequency Herkules hull mounted and Bronza dipping sonar
Armament:
  • 2 x 57 mm (2.2 in) guns (1 twin turret)
  • 2 x RBU-6000 anti submarine rocket launchers (RBU-2500 in Romanian and early Soviet ships)
  • 4 x 406 mm (16 in) anti submarine torpedo tubes; some ships have 2 x 533 mm (21 in) torpedo tubes)

The Poti class was the NATO reporting name for a group of anti submarine corvettes built for the Soviet Navy. The Soviet designation was Project 204 small anti-submarine ships. These ships were the first soviet warships powered by gas turbine engines; two propellers were mounted in tunnels to give a very shallow draught. A twin 57mm gun mounting provided self-defence.

Ships[edit]

Soviet Poti class corvette in 1983

A total of 66 ships were built between 1960 and 1968. In the Soviet Union the Poti class corvettes were decommissioned by the late 1980s; some Bulgarian ships served into the 21st century. Builders were:

  • Kerch yard 24 ships
  • Zelenodolsk yard : 31 ships
  • Khabarovsk yard: 11 ships

Exports[edit]

Hull number Name Soviet name Launched Transferred Fate
44

(ex-14, ex-33)

Khrabri - Храбрый (Valliant) MPK-? 1960s 1968 Decommissioned in 2005, sold for scrapping
45

(ex-44, ex-34)

Strogi - Строгий (Stern) MPK-? 1960s 1975 Decommissioned in 1994, sold for scrapping in Turkey 1997.
46

(ex-15, ex-35)

Bezstrashni - Бесстрашный (Fearless) MPK-? 1960s 1975 Gas turbines removed in 1994. Decommissioned in 2005, sold for scrapping
41 Letjashhi - Летящий (Flighty) MPK-? 1960s 1982 Decommissioned in 2005, sold for scrapping
42 Bditelni - Бдительный (Watchful) MPK-? 1960s 1982 Decommissioned in 2005, sold for scrapping
43 Naporisti - Напористый (Energetic) MPK-148 1962 1983 Decommissioned in 1994, sank during towing to Turkey in 1997

Note: The former Soviet numbers of most of the individual ships are not known, but it is known that MPK-59, MPK-77 and MPK-109 were among the ships given to Bulgaria.

Hull number Name Soviet name Launched Transferred Fate
31 none MPK-? 1967 1970 Decommissioned after 1992
32 none MPK-? 1967 1970 Decommissioned after 1992
33 none MPK-? 1967 1970 Decommissioned after 1992

Note: The former Soviet numbers of the individual ships are not known, but it is known that MPK-106 and MPK-125 were among the ships given to Romania. The Romanian ships carried the older RBU-2500 ASW rocket launchers and two 533 mm (21 in) torpedo tubes versus the newer RBU-6000 and four 406 mm (16 in) torpedoes on the Bulgarian ships.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://vimpel.boinaslava.net/index.php?module=bg_pr204
  2. ^ Capt. Sharpe, Richard (1991). Jane's Fighting Ships 1991-92. Coulsdon: Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-0960-4. 
  • Gardiner, Robert (ed.) (1995). Conway's all the World's Fighting Ships 1947-1995. London: Conway Maritime. ISBN 0-85177-605-1. OCLC 34284130.  Also published as Gardiner, Robert; Chumbley, Stephen; Budzbon, Przemysław (1995). Conway's all the World's Fighting Ships 1947-1995. 
  • (English) Russian Project 204 - Complete Ship List