Power Macintosh 5000 series

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The Macintosh Performa 5200, first of the 5200 series

The Power Macintosh 5000 series is a series of all-in-one (meaning the cases feature an integrated monitor) personal computers that are a part of Apple Computer's Macintosh LC, Power Macintosh and Macintosh Performa series of Macintosh computers.

The Power Macintosh 5200 LC was introduced in April 1995 with a PowerPC 603 CPU at 75 MHz as a PowerPC-based replacement of the Macintosh LC 500 series. Later models switched to the PowerPC 603e CPU and used model numbers above 5260, but kept the same motherboard design. Unlike previous education models, which prepended the model number with "LC", the 5200 series uses the Power Macintosh designation of Apple's main workstation line of the time and appends the LC to the end of the model name. All models in the 5xxx series featured an integrated 15-inch (12.8" viewable) monitor.

The 5200 series is closely related to the 6200 series, which features the same logic boards in desktop cases without integrated monitors. This means that it also shares the 6200's massive and confusing number of model designations and its unusual architecture with a 64-bit data path PowerPC CPU on a 32-bit data path logic board adapted from the Quadra 605.[1] This is the reason for various performance and stability issues, leading to the 5200 (and the 6200) series computers generally being regarded as having very compromised hardware designs.[2][3] Mac OS 8.1 and higher smooth out many of the problems with these computers.

Power Macintosh 5200 LC[edit]

Power Macintosh 5200 / Macintosh Performa 5200CD/5210CD
Developer Apple Computer, Inc.
Type Desktop
Release date April 3, 1995
Discontinued April 1, 1996
Operating system System 7.5.1 to Mac OS 9.1
CPU PowerPC 603, 75 MHz

Introduced in April 1995, the original 5200s use a 75 MHz PowerPC 603 CPU. The Power Macintosh 5200 LC was only sold to the education market, while the Performa models were sold to consumers. In April 1996, they were replaced by the 5260-related models, but some Performa models remained available for a longer time.

Models[edit]

  • Power Macintosh 5200 LC: Sold only to the education market. Features a 500 MB hard drive.
  • Macintosh Performa 5200CD: The Power Macintosh 5200 LC with a 790 MB or 1 GB hard drive.
  • Macintosh Performa 5210CD: Identical to the Power Macintosh 5200 LC (with different death chime from Performa 6200 instead of LC one), sold only in Asia and Europe.

Macintosh Performa 5215CD[edit]

Macintosh Performa 5215CD/5220CD
Developer Apple Computer, Inc.
Type Desktop
Release date July 17, 1995
Discontinued July 1, 1996
Operating system System 7.5.1 to Mac OS 9.1
CPU PowerPC 603, 75 MHz

Introduced in July 1995, this Performa model uses a 75 MHz PowerPC 603 CPU. The Macintosh Performa 5215CD was only sold to consumers. In April 1996, they were replaced by the 5260-related models, but some Performa models remained available for a longer time.

Models[edit]

  • Macintosh Performa 5215CD: The Performa 5200CD with a different software bundle.
  • Macintosh Performa 5220CD: The Performa 5215CD with a 500 MB hard drive, sold only in Asia and Europe.

Power Macintosh 5260[edit]

Power Macintosh 5260 / Macintosh Performa 5260/5270/5280
Developer Apple Computer, Inc.
Type All-in-one
Release date April 15, 1996
Discontinued July 1, 1996
Operating system System 7.5.3 to Mac OS 9.1
CPU PowerPC 603e, 100 and 120 MHz

The 5260 introduced on April 15, 1996, replaced the 6200's PowerPC 603 CPU with the newer and faster PowerPC 603e, though the rest of the architecture remained unchanged. The Power Macintosh 5400 with a new revised architecture was introduced shortly after, but the 5260 remained available at a lower price.

Models[edit]

  • Power Macintosh 5260/100: North American education model with 100 MHz CPU, 8 or 16 MiB of RAM, and an 800 MB hard disk
  • Power Macintosh 5260/120: Later North American education model with 120 MHz CPU, 16 MiB of RAM and a 1.2 GB hard disk
  • Macintosh Performa 5260CD: The Power Macintosh 5260/100, also available with the smaller 800 MB hard disk
  • Macintosh Performa 5260/120: Consumer version of 5260/120, only sold in Europe and Asia.
  • Macintosh Performa 5270CD: Identical to the Performa 5260CD, but only sold in Europe and Asia.
  • Macintosh Performa 5280/120: Consumer version of 5260/120, only sold in Europe and Asia.

Power Macintosh 5300 LC[edit]

Power Macintosh 5300 / Macintosh Performa 5300CD/5320CD
Developer Apple Computer, Inc.
Type Desktop
Release date August 28, 1995
Discontinued March 1, 1997
Operating system System 7.5.1 to Mac OS 9.1
CPU PowerPC 603e, 100 and 120 MHz

The 5300 introduced on August 28, 1995, replaced the 6200's PowerPC 603 CPU with the newer and faster PowerPC 603e, though the rest of the architecture remained unchanged. The Power Macintosh 5400 with a new revised architecture was introduced shortly after, but the 5300 also remained available at a lower price.

Models[edit]

  • Power Macintosh 5300 LC: The 5260/120, but with the slower 100 MHz processor of the 5260/100
  • Macintosh Performa 5300CD: Consumer version of the Power Macintosh 5300 LC.
  • Macintosh Performa 5300CD DE: Special "Director's Edition" of the 5300CD with additional software.
  • Macintosh Performa 5320CD: 120 MHz version of the 5300CD, only sold in Europe and Asia.

Power Macintosh 5400[edit]

Power Macintosh 5400 / Macintosh Performa 5400/5410/5420/5430/5440
Developer Apple Computer, Inc.
Type Desktop
Release date April 13, 1996
Discontinued March 1, 1998
Operating system System 7.5.3 to Mac OS 9.1
CPU PowerPC 603e, 120, 180 and 200 MHz

The Power Macintosh 5400 series (also sold under variations of the name Performa 5400) is a range of lower midrange personal computers that are a part of Apple Computer's Power Macintosh and Macintosh Performa families of Macintosh computers. The 5400 is an all-in-one computer with an integrated monitor, and replaced the Power Macintosh 5200 line in that role. It is largely identical to the Power Macintosh 6400 internally, which is essentially the same computer (the "Alchemy" platform) in a tower case. The 5400 was succeeded by the upgraded Power Macintosh 5500.

The Power Macintosh 5400 series saw much success in the educational environment.

Models[edit]

  • Power Macintosh 5400/120: Base education version with 16 MB RAM and an 120 MHz processor.
  • Power Macintosh 5400/180: Same, but with an 180 MHz processor.
  • Power Macintosh 5400/200: Education version with 24 MB RAM and a 200 MHz processor
  • Macintosh Performa 5400CD: Consumer version of the 5400/120.
  • Macintosh Performa 5400/160: Asia- and Europe-only version with a 160 MHz CPU.
  • Macintosh Performa 5400/180 (DE): Asia- and Europe-only 180 MHz variant in a black case. The "DE" (Director's Edition) was available only in Australia and had 24 MB of RAM, a built in TV tuner with remote control, and a bigger hard drive.
  • Macintosh Performa 5410CD: Ethernet-less version of the 5400CD.
  • Macintosh Performa 5420CD: The 5410CD in the 5400/180's black case.
  • Macintosh Performa 5430: Asia- and Europe-only variant of the 5400/160, but with 24 MB RAM.
  • Macintosh Performa 5440: Asia- and Europe-only variant of the 5400/180, only in a normal grey case.

Power Macintosh 5500[edit]

Power Macintosh 5500 / Macintosh Performa 5500
Developer Apple Computer, Inc.
Type Desktop
Release date February 17, 1997
Discontinued March 31, 1998
Operating system System 7.5.5 to Mac OS 9.1
CPU PowerPC 603e, 225, 250 and 275 MHz
The black "Director Edition"

The Power Macintosh 5500 – code-named "Phoenix" – was produced by Apple Inc. between February 1997 and early '98 and came with an IBM PowerPC 603ev processor operating at either 225, 250 and 275 megahertz (MHz). The processor made use of 32 kilobytes (KB)[4] of L1 cache, with an option for a 256 or 512 KB L2 cache (the latter being available only on the 275 MHz model) cache operating at the stock 50 MHz bus speed.

Apple originally produced the Power Macintosh 5500 or Performa 5500 for the educational market. It was essentially an upgraded Power Macintosh 5400. Though it dropped the name, it is functionally the successor to and last of the Macintosh LC line. The 5500's upgrades included a larger ATA hard disk. The computer came stock with a 2 gigabyte (GB)[5] hard disk, but the 275 MHz model came with a 4 GB drive; a faster SCSI CD-ROM drive (12x in early models and 24x in the top-end); a better video card in the form of an accelerated ATI Rage IIc graphics card, containing 2 megabytes (MB)[4] of dedicated VRAM and allowing for a maximum screen resolution of 1152 × 864 pixels.

5500s came with optional multimedia expansion cards, that connect via internal cables. In European models, these were an S-Video card and a Philips TV tuner card that also had an audio input. Black 5500s with this configuration were marketed as Director Editions in North America and Australasia and the 225 MHz version actually had the phrase printed on the case.

Like all other 5000 series PowerMacs, the 5500 is an All-In-One (AIO) computer – that is to say that the logic board, hard disk, floppy disk and CD-ROM drives, stereo speakers, monophonic microphone and 15" monitor are built into a single unit. This gives the computer the appearance of a television set – particularly when an aerial is connected to the built-in TV card. Like the 5400 series, the 5500 has one PCI card slot. The 225 and 250 MHz models were produced in beige and black, whilst the rarer 275 MHz models were only black.

The 5500 supports System Software versions 7.5.5 through 9.1 – Mac OS X is not officially supported on this machine. However, it can be run with XPostFacto but this is not recommended, due to the 5500's lack of a G3 processor and RAM ceiling of 128 MB. In the general case, 128 MB of RAM is the minimum required for OS X to run (a G3 iMac can run OS X with this amount of RAM), but only on machines with a G3 processor.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://lowendmac.com/ppc/5200.shtml
  2. ^ Remy Davison, Insanely Great Mac: The 10 worst Macs ever built
  3. ^ Low End Mac: Road Apples—Power Mac x200 series
  4. ^ a b The sizes of transistorized memory, such as RAM and cache sizes, are binary values whereby 1 KB = 210 (1024) bytes and 1 MB = 220 (1,048,576) bytes.
  5. ^ As with other computer manufacturers, for Apple’s hard drives, 1 GB equals 1 billion (1,000,000,000) bytes; actual formatted capacities are less.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Macintosh LC 500 series
Power Macintosh 5000 series
Performa 5000 series

April 3, 1995
Succeeded by
Power Macintosh G3 (All-in-One)
Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh