Prabda Yoon

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Prabda Yoon
Prabdapic.jpg
Born (1973-08-02) August 2, 1973 (age 40)
Occupation Novelist, Columnist
Language Thai
Nationality Thai

Prabda Yoon (born in 1973 in Bangkok) is a Thai writer, novelist, artist, graphic designer, magazine editor, screenwriter and translator. He is the son of Nation Multimedia Group executive and editor Suthichai Yoon.

Prabda graduated from the Cooper Union School of Art in New York City in 1997. He worked as a graphic designer briefly in Manhattan before returning to Thailand for his required military service.

After the service, Prabda started to write short stories and columns for various Thai magazines. He has since published collections of short stories, essays and novels. His screenplays include Last Life in the Universe, a 2003 film by director Pen-Ek Ratanaruang, as well as 2006's Invisible Waves, also directed by Pen-Ek.

He is the Thai translator of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye and Nine Stories, and Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange.

In 2002, at the age of 29, he won the S.E.A. Write Award for his collection of short stories, Kwam Na Ja Pen (Probability).

Prabda started his own small publishing house, Typhoon Books, in 2004. He lives and works in Bangkok.

Some of his literary work has been translated to Japanese.

Bibliography[edit]

Short stories[edit]

  • Right-angled City
  • Probability
  • Flood in the Eyes
  • The Moving Parts
  • This Really happened
  • The Shoulders of Mountains
  • Cleaning the Dead
  • Ancient Planet

Novels[edit]

  • Chit-tak!, 2002
  • Panda, 2004
  • Lessons in Rain, 2005
  • Under the Snow, 2006

Essays[edit]

  • Unstill Pictures
  • Water for the Skull
  • Please Don't Read, Carefully
  • Alive: On the Breath of Words
  • Imagined Landscapes
  • Page Zero
  • Hitting the Eyes
  • Writing to Japan
  • Music with Tears

Screenplays[edit]

  • Last Life in the Universe, with Pen-Ek Ratanaruang, 2003
  • Invisible Waves, 2006

References[edit]

Teh, David (December 24, 2005). Picking up the pieces, Bangkok Post. Retrieved December 30, 2005.

External links[edit]