Practical Astronomy with your Calculator

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Practical Astronomy with your Calculator
Author Peter Duffett-Smith
Subject Astronomy
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication date
1979
Pages 185
ISBN 0-521-35629-6

Practical Astronomy with your Calculator is a book written by Peter Duffett-Smith, a University Lecturer and a Fellow of Downing College. It was first published in 1979 and has been reprinted for over 30 years. The book teaches how to solve astronomical calculations with a pocket calculator. The topics covered in the book are time, coordinate systems, the Sun, the planetary systems, binary stars, the Moon and eclipses.[1] The third edition features new sections on generalised coordinate transformations, nutation, aberration, and selenographic coordinates.

The book has been used by amateur astronomers and those studying introductory astronomy. It was written because of a suggestion by Dr. Anthony Winter.[2]

Modern use[edit]

The mathematical operations used in the book are subtraction, addition, multiplication, division and trigonometric functions. Angles are illustrated in degrees and not radians. The calculations are carried out on a calculator. The book "explains in simpler terms the equations used to calculate almanac data."[3]

Reviews[edit]

The Cambridge Guide to Astronomical Discovery states that Practical Astronomy with your Calculator is a "must"-have book if one has no personal computer for astronomical calculations.[4] New Scientist magazine gave a favourable review of the book, although stating that there were small errors in some calculations.[5] Archaeoastronomy states "the book is recommended as easy to use and reliable."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Duffett-Smith Peter (1995), Practical Astronomy with your Calculator. Third Edition. Cambridge University Press. 
  2. ^ Duffett-Smith Peter (1995), Practical Astronomy with your Calculator. Third Edition. Cambridge University Press. 
  3. ^ Burch David (1986), Emergency Navigation:find your position and shape your course at sea even if your instruments fail. Second Edition. International Marine/McGrawhill page 251 
  4. ^ Liller William (1992). The Cambridge Guide To Astronomical Discovery. Cambridge University Press. p. 242. 
  5. ^ New Scientist 85 (1189): 92. 10 January 1980. 
  6. ^ Archaeoastronomy:Vol 3-4. Center for Archaeoastronomy. University of Maryland. 1980. p. 42.