Practitioner research

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Practitioner Research refers to academic research and/or workplace research such as evaluation performed by individuals who also work in a professional field as opposed to being full-time academic researchers. Practitioner research developed as a recognised type of research in the last quarter of the 20th century. In this context, 'practitioner' means someone who delivers public services, such as a nurse, teacher, advice worker, probation officer, counsellor or social worker.[1] To begin with, practitioner research developed in disciplinary silos,[2][3][4] but by the turn of the century it had been recognised that all disciplines could approach practitioner research in broadly the same way.[5]

For a practitioner, doing research alongside practice can assist with one or more of the following:

  • Solving a specific problem, such as how to reduce crime on a particular housing estate.
  • Contributing to the learning of a discipline such as education or social work.
  • Influencing government policy, e.g. welfare or health policy.[6]

It is also held to improve the quality of the practitioner-researcher's practice.[7]

Practitioner research has two categories:[8]

  • Research in the workplace, such as a service evaluation or needs assessment, and
  • Academic research related to the practitioner's role, such as a master's degree or PhD in a relevant subject.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kara H (2012) Research and evaluation for busy practitioners: a time-saving guide, p.1. Bristol: The Policy Press.
  2. ^ Molde S and Diers D (1985) Nurse practitioner research: selected literature review and research agenda. In Nursing Research 34(6) pp 362-367
  3. ^ Bell G and Colbeck B (1984) Whole school practitioner research: the Sunnyside Action Inquiry Project. In Educational Research 26(2) pp 88-94
  4. ^ Pieper M (1985) The future of social work research. In Social Work Research Abstracts 21(4) pp 3-11
  5. ^ Wilkinson D (ed) (2000) The researcher's toolkit: the complete guide to practitioner research (Routledge Study Guides). Abingdon: Routledge.
  6. ^ Wilkinson D (ed) (2000) The researcher's toolkit: the complete guide to practitioner research (Routledge Study Guides), p.2. Abingdon: Routledge.
  7. ^ Fox M, Martin P and Green G (2007) Doing practitioner research, p. 88. London: Sage.
  8. ^ Kara H (2012) Research and evaluation for busy practitioners: a time-saving guide, p. 1. Bristol: The Policy Press

Further reading[edit]

  • Drake P and Heath L (2011) Practitioner research at doctoral level: developing coherent research methodologies. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Dahlberg L and McCaig C (eds) (2010) Practical research and evaluation: a start-to-finish guide for practitioners. London: Sage.