Premio Lo Nuestro 1989

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1st Lo Nuestro Awards
Date Wednesday, May 31, 1989 (1989-05-31)
Site Knight Center
Miami, Florida, USA
Host Lucy Pereda and Antonio Vodanovich
Highlights
Most awards Los Bukis and Lalo Rodríguez (3)
  Lo Nuestro Awards 2nd > 

The 1st Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1988 and 1989 took place in May 31, 1989 at the Knight Center, in Miami, Florida, United States. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

During the ceremony, nineteen categories were presented. Winners were announced at the live event and included Mexican band Los Bukis and Puerto-Rican singer Lalo Rodríguez receiving three awards each. Spanish performer Isabel Pantoja earned two accolades, including Pop Album of the Year. Mexican singer-songwriter Marco Antonio Solís was named Producer of the Year, while Roberto Livi and Alberto Campoy won for Composer of the Year for the track "Toco Madera" performed by Spanish singer Raphael.

Background[edit]

In 1989, the Lo Nuestro Awards were established by Univision, to recognize the most talented performers of Latin music.[1] Joaquín Blaya, President of Univision, named the awards the "Hispanic Grammys", since the Lo Nuestro would be the first Spanish-language music awards shows that does not reveal winners before the broadcast of the show. "The time has come for us to legitimize an award that recognizes Hispanic talent, and we wanted to do it by the same standard that the (English language) industry is measured," Blaya added.[2] The nominees and winners were selected by a voting poll conducted among program directors of Spanish-language radio stations in the United States and also based on chart performance on Billboard Latin music charts, with the results being tabulated and certified by the accounting firm Deloitte.[1][3] The award included a trophy shaped like a treble clef.[1] The categories were for the Pop, Tropical/Salsa, and Regional Mexican genres, with additional awards for Producer, Composer and Crossover Artist of the Year, respectively.[2][3] The 1st Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony was held in May 31, 1989 at the Knight Center, in Miami, Florida, United States. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision with an estimated audience of 200 million viewers in 16 countries.[2][3]

Winners and nominees[edit]

Spanish singer Isabel Pantoja (pictured in 2012) won the Lo Nuestro Award for Pop Female Artist of the Year.
Mexican performer José José (pictured in 2000) won for Pop Male Singer of the Year.
Singer Vicente Fernández (pictured in 2011) received the Male Regional Mexican Artist of the Year Award.

Winners were announced before the live audience during the ceremony. Mexican band Los Bukis dominated the Regional/Mexican field winning for Group, Song ("Y Ahora Te Vas") and Album of the Year (Si Me Recuerdas).[4] The album was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album.[5] Three awards were also received by Puerto-Rican Lalo Rodríguez, including Tropical/Salsa Artist, Album (Un Nuevo Despertar) and Song of the Year for his top ten single "Ven, Devórame Otra Vez".[6] Mexican singer Yuri was awarded for Pop Song of the Year for "Qué Te Pasa", a track that spent 16 weeks at number-one in the Billboard Top Latin Songs chart.[7] Desde Andalucía by Spanish singer Isabel Pantoja won for Pop Album of the Year and reached number-one in the Billboard Latin Pop Albums chart.[8]

Winners and nominees of the 1st Annual Lo Nuestro Awards.[2][4][9]
Pop Album of the Year Pop Song of the Year
Pop Male Artist of the Year Pop Female Artist of the Year
Pop Group of the Year Pop New Artist of the Year
Regional Mexican Album of the Year Regional Mexican Song of the Year
Regional Mexican Artist of the Year Regional Mexican Group of the Year
Regional Mexican New Artist of the Year
  • José Javier Solís
    • Grupo Topaz
    • Industria del Amor
    • Eliseo Robles
Tropical Salsa Album of the Year Tropical Salsa Song of the Year
Tropical Salsa Artist of the Year Tropical Salsa Group of the Year
Tropical Salsa New Artist of the Year
Producer of the Year Composer of the Year
Crossover Artist of the Year

Presenters[edit]

Presenter(s) Category
Yuri
Franco
Presenters of the awards for Tropical Artist and Tropical Group of the Year
Braulio
Angela Carrasco
Presenters of the awards for Tropical Album of the Year
Starr, Brenda K.Brenda K. Starr
Jorge Múñiz
Presenters of the awards for Tropical New Artist and Tropical Song of the Year
Jurado, RocíoRocío Jurado
José Luis Rodríguez
Presenters of the awards for Regional Mexican Group and Regional Mexican Artist of the Year
Luis Angel
Ednita Nazario
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican New Artist
Yuri
Franco
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican Album of the Year
Gabriel, AnaAna Gabriel
José Luis Rodríguez
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican Song of the Year
Carrasco, AngelaAngela Carrasco Presenter of the award for Composer of the Year
Solís, José JavierJosé Javier Solís Presenter of the award for Pop Group of the Year
Carr, VikkiVikki Carr Presenter of the award for Crossover Artist of the Year
Montaner, RicardoRicardo Montaner
Roberto Livi
Presenters of the award for Producer of the Year
Luis Enrique
Marco Antonio Solís
Presenters of the award for Pop Female Artist
Carr, VikkiVikki Carr Presenter of the award for Pop Male Artist
Estefan, GloriaGloria Estefan
Emilio Estefan
Presenters of the awards for Pop Album of the Year and Pop Song of the Year

Source:[10][11]

Performers[edit]

Name(s) Role Performed
Montaner, RicardoRicardo Montaner Performer "Tan Enamorados"
Los Yonics Performers
Carr, VikkiVikki Carr
Mariachi Cobre
Stephen Carrillo
Performers "Ranchero Medley"
Luis Enrique Performer "Desesperado"
Carrasco, AngelaAngela Carrasco Performer "Boca Rosa"
Olivares, FitoFito Olivares y su Orquesta Performer "Mi Caballito"
Starr, Brenda K.Brenda K. Starr Performer "Breakfast in Bed"
Javier Solís, JoséJosé Javier Solís Performer
Rumba Tres
Ballet Flamenco de Rosita Segovia
Performers "Bamboleo"
Gabriel, AnaAna Gabriel Performer "Ay Amor"
Franco Performer "María"
Yuri Performer "Hombres al Borde de un Ataque de Celos"
Braulio Performer "Amándote, Soñandote"
Rodríguez, José LuisJosé Luis Rodríguez Performer "Baila Mi Rumba"
Los Bukis Performers "Y Ahora Te Vas"
Carlos, RobertoRoberto Carlos Performer "Mis Amores"

Source:[10][11]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Historia: Premios Lo Nuestro". Terra (in Spanish). Terra Networks, Inc. February 6, 2006. Retrieved June 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d Coto, Juan Carlos (May 28, 1989). "Univision Launches Latin Music Awards". The Miami Herald (The McClatchy Company). (subscription required (help)). 
  3. ^ a b c Lannert, John (April 1, 1990). "Univision, Billboard Announce Latin Music Awards Nominees". Sun-Sentinel (Tribune Company). Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Lo Nuestro 1989 – Historia". Univision (in Spanish). Univision Communications, Inc. 1989. Retrieved September 9, 2013. 
  5. ^ Burr 1999, p. 191
  6. ^ "Lalo Rodríguez – Chart History". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Topping The Charts Year By Year". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 110 (48): LMQ3. November 28, 1998. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Isabel Pantoja – Chart History". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  9. ^ Premio Lo Nuestro 1989 (Television). Miami, Florida, United States: Univision. 1989. 
  10. ^ a b "Premio Lo Nuestro a la Musica Latina 1989 (Lo Nuestro Latin Music Awards) (Premiere) (Spanish) (Tape 1 of 2) (TV)". Paley Center for Media. May 31, 1989. Retrieved February 11, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b "Premio Lo Nuestro a la Musica Latina 1989 (Lo Nuestro Latin Music Awards) (Premiere) (Spanish) (Tape 2 of 2) (TV)". Paley Center for Media. May 31, 1989. Retrieved February 11, 2014. 

References[edit]

  • Burr, Ramiro (1999). Billboard Guide to Tejano and Regional Mexican Music. Crown Publishing Group. ISBN 0823076911.