Premio Lo Nuestro 1991

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3rd Lo Nuestro Awards
Date Thursday, May 23, 1991 (1991-05-23)
Site James L. Knight Center
Miami, Florida, USA
Host Antonio Vodanovich
Highlights
Most awards Ana Gabriel and Juan Luis Guerra y 440 (3)
Most nominations Juan Luis Guerra (5)
 < 2nd Lo Nuestro Awards 4th > 

The 3rd Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1990 and 1991 took place on May 23, 1991, at a live presentation held at the James L. Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

During the ceremony, seventeen categories were presented. Winners were announced at the live event and included Mexican singer-songwriter Ana Gabriel and Dominican group Juan Luis Guerra y 440, receiving three competitive awards each. Mexican band Bronco earned two accolades. The live show included performances by Daniela Romo, Myriam Hernández, Raúl di Blasio, Rudy La Scala, Franco de Vita, Luis Enrique, Banda Blanca, Los Tigres del Norte, Orquesta de la Luz, Azúcar Moreno, Yuri, and Mariachi Cobre.

Background[edit]

In 1989, the Lo Nuestro Awards were established by Univision, to recognize the most talented performers of Latin music.[1] The nominees and winners were selected by a voting poll conducted among program directors of Spanish-language radio stations in the United States and also based on chart performance on Billboard Latin music charts, with the results being tabulated and certified by the accounting firm Deloitte.[1][2][3] The trophy awarded is shaped like a treble clef.[1] The categories were for the Pop, Tropical/Salsa, Regional Mexican genres and Music Video fields.[3] The 3rd Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony was held on May 23, 1991, in a live presentation held at the James L. Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision and included live performances by Daniela Romo, Ana Gabriel, Myriam Hernández, Raúl di Blasio, Rudy La Scala, Franco de Vita, Luis Enrique, Banda Blanca, Los Tigres del Norte, Orquesta de la Luz, Azúcar Moreno, Yuri, and Mariachi Cobre.[3]

Winners and nominees[edit]

Mexican singer Ana Gabriel (pictured in 2006) won the Lo Nuestro Award for Pop Female Artist of the Year.
Singer Vicente Fernández (pictured in 2011) received the Male Regional Mexican Artist of the Year Award.

Winners were announced before the live audience during the ceremony. Mexican singer-songwriter Ana Gabriel was the most nominated performer and won three of her nominations, including Pop Song of the Year for "Es Demasiado Tarde" (Gabriel was a double nominee in the category).[4] The track was named the best-performing Latin single of 1991 in the United States.[5] Dominican band Juan Luis Guerra y 440 were triple nominees for Tropical Salsa Song of the Year winning for "Burbujas de Amor", Group of the Year and Music Video.[3][4] Mexican band Bronco dominated the Regional/Mexican field winning Album and Song of the Year with "Corazón Duro".[4] Mexican singer-songwriter Juan Gabriel and Spanish opera singer Plácido Domingo received Lifetime Achievement Awards.[4]

Winners and nominees of the 3rd Annual Lo Nuestro Awards (winners listed first).[3][4]
Pop Album of the Year Pop Song of the Year
Male Artist of the Year, Pop Female Artist of the Year, Pop
Pop Group of the Year New Pop Artist of the Year
Regional Mexican Album of the Year Regional Mexican Song of the Year
Regional Mexican Artist of the Year Regional Mexican Group of the Year
Regional Mexican New Artist of the Year
Tropical/Salsa Album of the Year Tropical/Salsa Song of the Year
Tropical Salsa Artist of the Year Tropical Salsa Group of the Year
Tropical Salsa New Artist of the Year Video of the Year

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Historia: Premios Lo Nuestro". Terra (in Spanish). Terra Networks, Inc. February 6, 2006. Retrieved June 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Univision Announces the Nominees for Spanish-language Music's Highest Honors Premio Lo Nuestro a la Musica Latina". Univision. March 27, 1996. Retrieved June 11, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Lannert, John (May 24, 1991). "Hispanic Music Industry Salutes Its Best Wednesday". Sun-Sentinel (Tribune Company). Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Lannert, John (June 1, 1991). "Latin Music Finds Harmony In Awards Crisp, Entertaining Tv Program A Breakthrough For Fledgling Trade Group.". Sun-Sentinel (Tribune Company). Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Topping The Charts Year By Year". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 110 (48): LMQ3. November 28, 1998. Retrieved August 17, 2013.