Presbyterian Ladies' College, Perth

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For other schools of the same name, see Presbyterian Ladies' College (disambiguation).
Presbyterian Ladies' College, Perth
Plcperthcrest.jpg
Latin: Labore Et Honore
By Work and With Honour
Location
Peppermint Grove, WA, AustraliaAustralia
Coordinates 31°59′41″S 115°46′7″E / 31.99472°S 115.76861°E / -31.99472; 115.76861Coordinates: 31°59′41″S 115°46′7″E / 31.99472°S 115.76861°E / -31.99472; 115.76861
Information
Type Independent, Single-sex, Day and Boarding
Denomination Uniting Church
Established 1915
Chairman Emeritus Professor Tracey Horton
Principal Ms Bethlyn Blackwood
Chaplain Rev Gary Van Heerden
Employees ~141[1]
Enrolment ~1200 (PK–12)[2]
Colour(s) Green, Navy and White
              
Slogan Enriching your daughter's future[1]
Website

The Presbyterian Ladies' College (informally known as PLC), is an independent, day and boarding school predominantly for girls, situated in Peppermint Grove, a western suburb of Perth, Western Australia.

Established in 1915 by the Presbyterian Church of Australia, PLC came under the control of the Uniting Church in Australia in 1977 following church union. The college moved to the current grounds (an 8-acre (32,000 m2) property) in 1917. PLC's grounds consist of a junior school for years Pre-Kindy to Year 6, a middle school for Years 7 to 9, a senior school for Years 10 to 12, sporting grounds, arts centres and boarding facilities. The school currently caters for approximately 1200 students, with boys and girls enrolled from Pre-Kindergarten to Pre-Primary and girls only from Year 1 to Year 12.[2] PLC also provides accommodation for up to 150 boarders in Years 7 to 12.[3]

The College has been an IB World School since December 2006, and is authorised to offer the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) and IB Middle Years Programme and the IB Diploma Programme. PLC is also registered to offer the Western Australian State Curriculum to Years 11 and 12.[4] PLC is affiliated with the Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia (AHISA),[5] the Junior School Heads Association of Australia (JSHAA),[6] the Australian Boarding Schools' Association (ABSA),[2] and the Alliance of Girls' Schools Australia (AGSA).[7]

History[edit]

PLC students and building, 1937

On 19 August 1915, Rev George Nisbet Dods, the Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Western Australia, called together a group of Ministers and Church Elders to discuss the proposal of establishing a Presbyterian college for girls, since the Church had already established the Scotch College, Perth for boys. Present at this meeting were Rev Dods, Rev Alexander Crow, Principal Oxer, Daniel Ross, Peter Corsair Anderson (Principal of Scotch College, Perth), John Maxwell Ferguson, Donald John Carmichael, Inspector of Schools James Klein and Professor Alexander David Ross.

Ormiston College had been established in 1907, by Miss Wilson and her two sisters in Palmerston Street, North Perth. The newly formed committee agreed to purchase Ormiston College, and the School was named Presbyterian Ladies' College and Kindergarten (Ormiston House). Wilson was taken up on her offer to continue acting as Principal until a permanent one was appointed. The successful applicant was Miss Agnes Scorgie, a certified teacher with an MA from Glasgow University. She had also studied modern language at three European universities, and had taught for twelve years at Glasgow High School. Scorgie arrived in Fremantle on 24 February 1916, and took up her duties immediately.

In January 1917, the School's Committee was constituted as the first College Council. After considering several permanent locations for the School, it eventually settled on the purchase of W G Lefroy's property on the corner of View and McNeil Streets, Peppermint Grove. After modifications and additions to the property, all boarders were transferred from North Perth, and the first classes began on the new campus in July. The School was officially opened by the Governor of Western Australia, Sir William Ellison-Macartney, on 11 August 1917. The North Perth campus remained operating as a day school until the end of 1918.

Academic performance[edit]

The school has traditionally performed well in the Western Australian Certificate of Education examinations and appear regularly among the top 10 schools in the state.

Year % +75 in WACE[i] State ranking[ii] % +65 in WACE[iii] State ranking % graduation[iv]
2013 32.20 4 62.26 4 100[8]
2012 23.13 12 63.15 5 99.34[9]
2011 29.54 5 71.72 3 100[10]
2010 31.31 4 70.56 4 99.39[11]
2009 4 8 97.86[12]
  1. ^ Based on the number of Stage 3 course enrolments in the school where a WACE course score of 75 or above was achieved
  2. ^ Ranking of school compared to other schools in the state
  3. ^ Based on the number of Stage 3 course enrolments in the school where a WACE course score of 65 or above was achieved
  4. ^ Percentage of Year 12 cohort that graduated with a WACE certificate

House system[edit]

As with most Australian schools, PLC utilises a house system through which students participate in inter-house activities and competitions. The House system was introduced in 1934 by Dr Vera Summers in her first year as Principal with three houses: Carmichael, Stewart and Ferguson, in the colours of the new uniform; navy, green and white. McNeil was added in 1943 and further expanded in 1977 by the addition of Summers and Baird.

Carmichael Colour: blue. Named for Founder, Past Treasurer and Past Chair of Council Donald John Carmichael.

Stewart Colour: green. Named for benefactor and Council member John Stewart.

Ferguson Colour: red (changed from white in 1957). Named for Founder John Maxwell Ferguson.

McNeil Colour: yellow. Named for early local resident, PLC Council member and benefactor Neil McNeil.

Summers Colour: initially white but changed to purple in 1999. Named for Dr Vera Summers OBE who was on teaching staff from 1920 and Principal from 1934-61.

Baird Colour: orange. Named for the Baird family from which two Past Chairs of Council, one teacher and many students came.

Ross Colour: Black Named after Dr Alexander Graham Ross part of the founders

Co-curriculum[edit]

Music[edit]

PLC offers music ensembles to both Junior and Senior students, including a Stage Band, three concert bands, three string orchestras, several string quartets, a combined Chorale with Trinity College, a combined string chamber orchestra with Scotch College as well as a combined symphonic wind ensemble and vocal ensemble with PLC's brother school, Scotch College.

The school also features an all female Pipe Band, one of only a small number throughout Australia. The Pipe Band is a long standing tradition of the School and reflects PLC's Scottish heritage.[13]

Visual art[edit]

At PLC there is an annual visual art exhibition exhibiting works of current students done during the school year ranging from sculpture to textiles and painting. Works from PLC have been selected over the years and in 2012 to be shown in the annual 'Year 12 Visual Art Perspectives' at the Art Gallery of Western Australia.

Performing arts[edit]

PLC also offers performing arts subjects, such as drama and dance. Dance and Drama performances are shown annually at the school, as well as year based curriculum performances.

Sport[edit]

The Presbyterian Ladies' College Physical Education programme provides students of all abilities with opportunities to partake in recreational activities such as yoga and aerobics, and team sports such as netball, basketball, cricket, tennis, hockey, volleyball, soccer, softball, rowing and water polo.[14]

Inter-school competition is enabled through PLC's membership of the Junior School Heads Association of Australia (JSHAA) for primary students, and the Independent Girls Schools Sports Association (IGSSA) for middle and senior students.

Notable alumnae[edit]

Alumnae of the Presbyterian Ladies' College are known as Old Collegians, and may elect to join the schools alumni association, the PLC Old Collegians' Association (PLC OCA).[15] Some notable Old Collegians include:

Academic
Entertainment, media and the arts
Medicine and science
Sport

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Educational Accountability: School Performance Information". Presbyterian Ladies' College. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b c "Schools: Presbyterian Ladies College (Perth)". Schools. Australian Boarding Schools' Association. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  3. ^ "Boarding". Presbyterian Ladies' College. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Presbyterian Ladies' College - Perth". IB World Schools. International Baccalaureate Organisation. Retrieved 2008-03-15. 
  5. ^ "Western Australia". AHISA Schools. Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia. April 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-08-29. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  6. ^ "JSHAA Western Australia Directory of Members". Western Australia Branch. Junior School Heads' Association of Australia. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  7. ^ "Member Schools". Schools. The Alliance of Girls' Schools Australia. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  8. ^ "Year 12 Student Achievement Data". Government of Western Australia. 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2014. 
  9. ^ "Year 12 Student Achievement Data". Government of Western Australia. 2012. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  10. ^ "Year 12 Student Achievement Data". Government of Western Australia. 2011. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  11. ^ "Year 12 Student Achievement Data". Government of Western Australia. 2010. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  12. ^ "Year 12 Student Achievement Data". Government of Western Australia. 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  13. ^ "Music". Presbyterian Ladies' College. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. [dead link]
  14. ^ "Physical Education". Presbyterian Ladies' College. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. [dead link]
  15. ^ "PLC Old Collegians' Association". Presbyterian Ladies' College. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-11. [dead link]
  16. ^ Suzannah Pearce, ed. (2006-11-17). "MOORE Gillian Margaret". Who's Who in Australia Live!. North Melbourne, Vic: Crown Content Pty Ltd. 
  17. ^ a b Brasch (ed.), Nicolas (1996). Contemporary Australian Women 1996/97. Port Melbourne, Vic.: Reed Reference Australia. ISBN 1-875589-92-9. 
  18. ^ Lofthouse, Andrea (1982). Who's Who of Australian Women 1982. North Ryde, NSW: Methuen Australia. p. 128. ISBN 0-454-00437-0. 
  19. ^ "Author Information: Melissa Hasluck". Freshwater Bay Press. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  20. ^ Stellar Cast Announced for The Mousetrap
  21. ^ Suzannah Pearce, ed. (2006-11-17). "KING Mary-Ellen Murdoch". Who's Who in Australia Live!. North Melbourne, Vic: Crown Content Pty Ltd. 
  22. ^ "Biography: Theatre". Theatre Life. Judy Nunn. Retrieved 2008-01-22. 
  23. ^ "Celebrity Overview: Paula Voce Seven News". Hottest on TV. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  24. ^ Suzannah Pearce, ed. (2006-11-17). "WALLACE Sue-Anne". Who's Who in Australia Live!. North Melbourne, Vic: Crown Content Pty Ltd. 
  25. ^ http://www.throng.com.au/australias-next-top-model/tahnee-atkinson
  26. ^ http://au.tv.yahoo.com/b/make-me-a-supermodel/80/courtney-chircop
  27. ^ Ryan, Siobhain (4 September 2008). "CSIRO discovers its new chief at BHP". The Australian. Retrieved 3 July 2010. 
  28. ^ Suzannah Pearce, ed. (2006-11-17). "HENDERSON Margaret Mary". Who's Who in Australia Live!. North Melbourne, Vic: Crown Content Pty Ltd. 
  29. ^ Crouch, Bruce (2002). "Tully, Joan (1907 - 1973)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Melbourne University Press. Retrieved 2007-09-11. 
  30. ^ "London 2012 - Hannah Vermeersch". Australia: Australian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 2013-03-17. 

External links[edit]