Prescott Gardner Hewett

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Sir Prescott Gardner Hewett, 1st Baronet, FRCS (3 July 1812 – 19 June 1891) was a British surgeon, and the son of a Yorkshire country gentleman.

Life as a priest[edit]

Hewett lived for some years in early life in Paris, and started on a career as an artist, but abandoned it for surgery. He entered Saint George's Hospital, London (where his half-brother, Dr Cornwallis Hewett, was a physician from 1825 to 1833), becoming demonstrator of anatomy and curator of the museum. He was the pupil and intimate friend of Sir Benjamin Collins Brodie, and helped the latter in much of his work.[1]

Eventually he rose to be anatomical lecturer, assistant-surgeon and surgeon to the hospital. In 1873 he was elected President of the Clinical Society of London.[2] In 1876, he was president of the College of Surgeons, and in 1877, he was made serjeant-surgeon extraordinary to Queen Victoria, in 1884 serjeant-surgeon, and in 1883 he was created a baronet. [1] In June 1874 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society [3]

Hewett was a very good lecturer, but shrank from authorship; his lectures on Surgical Affections of the Head were, however, embodied in his treatise on the subject in Holmes's System of Surgery. As a surgeon, he was always extremely conservative, but hesitated at no operation, no matter how severe, when convinced of its expediency. He was a perfect operator, and one of the most trustworthy of counsellors.[1]

Hewett died in 1891 and is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.

Family[edit]

He married, on 13 September 1849, Sarah, eldest daughter of the Rev. Joseph Cowell of Todmorden, Lancashire, by whom he had one son, who survived him only a few weeks, and two daughters.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Chisholm 1911.
  2. ^ "Transactions of the Clinical Society of London Volume 18 1886". Clinical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-23.  archive.org
  3. ^ "Library and Archive Catalogue". Royal Society. Retrieved 18 November 2010. 
  4. ^ Power 1901.
Attribution

External links[edit]

Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.