Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues

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The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (the Commission) was created by Executive Order 13521 on November 24, 2009.[1] The Commission is an advisory panel of the nation’s leaders in medicine, science, ethics, religion, law, and engineering. The Commission advises the President on bioethical issues arising from advances in biomedicine and related areas of science and technology. The Commission seeks to identify and promote policies and practices that ensure scientific research, health care delivery, and technological innovation are conducted in a socially and ethically responsible manner.

Reports[edit]

  • Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1), published in May 2014, recommends an early and explicit integration of ethics throughout research, as well as the integration of ethics and science through education at all levels, the evaluation of existing and innovative approaches to ethics integration, and the explicit inclusion of ethical perspectives on advisory and review bodies.[2]
  • Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings in the Clinical, Research, and Direct-to-Consumer Contexts, published in December 2013, recommends that all practitioners anticipate and plan for incidental and secondary findings and communicate that plan to patients, research participants, and consumers so they are informed ahead of time about what to expect.[3]
  • Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research, published in March 2013, concluded that the federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered.[4]
  • Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing, published in October 2012, concluded that to realize the enormous promise that whole genome sequencing holds for advancing clinical care and the greater public good, individual interests in privacy must be respected and secured.[5]
  • Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research, published in December 2011, recommends 14 changes to current practices to better protect participants in research. In particular, the Commission called on the federal government to improve its tracking of research programs supported with taxpayer dollars.[6]
  • "Ethically Impossible": STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948, published in September 2011, concluded that the Guatemala syphilis experiments "involved unconscionable basic violations of ethics, even as judged against the researchers’ own recognition of the requirements of the medical ethics of the day."[7]
  • New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technologies, published in December 2010, recommended increased federal oversight of synthetic biology research.[8]

Members[edit]

Former Members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Executive Order 13521 - Establishing the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, November 24, 2009, Vol. 74, No. 228, 74 F.R. 62671
  2. ^ Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published May 2014, accessed 2014-6-11
  3. ^ Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings in the Clinical, Research, and Direct-to-Consumer Contexts, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published December 2013, accessed 2014-4-2
  4. ^ Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published March 2013, accessed 2013-8-13
  5. ^ Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published October 2012, accessed 2012-11-29
  6. ^ Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published December 2011, accessed 2012-11-29
  7. ^ Ethically Impossible: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published September 2011, accessed 2012-11-29
  8. ^ New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technologies, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, published December 2010, accessed 2012-11-29

External links[edit]