Priest Hutton

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Coordinates: 54°09′25″N 2°43′08″W / 54.157°N 2.719°W / 54.157; -2.719

Priest Hutton
Chapel near Longlands Inn - geograph.org.uk - 218322.jpg
Tewitfield Methodist Church
Priest Hutton is located in Lancashire
Priest Hutton
Priest Hutton
 Priest Hutton shown within Lancashire
Population 177 (2001)
OS grid reference SD5373
Civil parish Priest Hutton
District Lancaster
Shire county Lancashire
Region North West
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town CARNFORTH
Postcode district LA6
Dialling code 015242
Police Lancashire
Fire Lancashire
Ambulance North West
EU Parliament North West England
UK Parliament Morecambe and Lunesdale
List of places
UK
England
Lancashire

Priest Hutton is a village and civil parish in Lancashire, England. It is located 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north east of Carnforth, in the City of Lancaster, close to the boundary with Cumbria. In the 2001 census Priest Hutton had a population of 177.[1]

The village, situated off the A6070 is in a rural area, and has few facilities of its own. The village school closed in 1978, and the nearest school and post office are at Burton-in-Kendal, north of the county boundary. Other facilities, such as Borwick and Priest Hutton Memorial Hall, and St Mary's Church, are shared with the neighbouring village of Borwick, south of Priest Hutton. Priest Hutton has no parish council, instead there is a parish meeting at the Memorial Hall.[2][3]

In the south west corner of the parish, at Tewitfield, there is a marina on the Lancaster Canal, currently the northern terminus of the canal's navigable section.

The former Archbishop of York, Matthew Hutton, was born in the village in 1529.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Office for National Statistics : Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Lancaster Retrieved 14 February 2010
  2. ^ "Priest Hutton Parish Meeting". Lancashire County Council. Retrieved 2009-02-08. 
  3. ^ Lakin, Nick (2008-07-24). "Burton-in-Kendal feature". Lancaster Guardian. Johnston Press. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  4. ^ "'Townships: Priest Hutton', A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 8 (1914)". British History Online. University of London & History of Parliament Trust. pp. 182–183. Retrieved 2009-02-08. 

External links[edit]