Priestley Medal

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Priestley Medal
PriestleyMedal.jpg
Priestley Medal obverse
Awarded for Distinguished service in the field of chemistry
Date 1923 (1923)
Presented by American Chemical Society (ACS)

The Priestley Medal is the highest honor conferred by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is awarded for distinguished service in the field of chemistry.[1][2][3] Established in 1922, the award is named after Joseph Priestley, the discoverer of oxygen who immigrated to the United States of America in 1794. The ACS formed in 1876, spearheaded by a group of chemists who had met two years previously in Priestley's home.[4]

The Priestley Medal is commonly awarded to scientists who are advanced in their fields, as it is intended to commemorate lifetime achievement.[4] When the ACS started presenting the Priestley Medal in 1923, they intended to award it every three years. This continued until 1944, when it became an annual award.[4]

Recipients[edit]

Priestley Medal reverse (awarded to Linus Pauling in 1984)

1920s[edit]

1930s[edit]

1940s[edit]

1950s[edit]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

1990s[edit]

2000s[edit]

2010s[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Priestley Medal". Funding & Awards. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  2. ^ Schofield, Robert E. (2004). The Enlightened Joseph Priestley: A Study of His Life and Work from 1773 to 1804. Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 372. ISBN 0-271-02459-3. 
  3. ^ Bowden, Mary Ellen; Rosner, Lisa (2005). Joseph Priestley, Radical Thinker. Chemical Heritage Foundation. p. 16. ISBN 0-941901-38-6. 
  4. ^ a b c Raber, Linda R. (2008-04-07). "85th Anniversary of the Priestley Medal". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  5. ^ Halford, Bethany (2013-06-10). "Stephen Lippard Named Priestley Medalist". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  6. ^ Wilson, Elizabeth K. (2014-06-10). "Jacqueline Barton Named Priestley Medalist". Chemical & Engineering News. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-12. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Charles L. Parsons (1932). "Priestley memorial and medal". Journal of Chemical Education 9 (4): 643–346. doi:10.1021/ed009p643.  edit

External links[edit]