Prime k-tuple

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Prime constellation)
Jump to: navigation, search

In number theory, a prime k-tuple is a finite collection of values representing a repeatable pattern of differences between prime numbers. For a k-tuple (a, b, ...), the positions where the k-tuple matches a pattern in the prime numbers are given by the set of integers n such that all of the values (n + a, n + b, ...) are prime. Typically the first value in the k-tuple is 0 and the rest are distinct positive even numbers.[1]

Named patterns[edit]

Several of the shortest k-tuples are known by other common names:

(0, 2) twin primes
(0, 4) cousin primes
(0, 6) sexy primes
(0, 2, 6), (0, 4, 6) prime triplets
(0, 6, 12) sexy prime triplets
(0, 2, 6, 8) prime quadruplets
(0, 6, 12, 18) sexy prime quadruplets
(0, 2, 6, 8, 12), (0, 4, 6, 10, 12) quintuplet primes
(0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16) sextuplet primes

Admissibility[edit]

In order for a k-tuple to have infinitely many positions at which all of its values are prime, there cannot exist a prime p such that the tuple includes every different possible value modulo p. For, if such a prime p existed, then no matter which value of n was chosen, one of the values formed by adding n to the tuple would be divisible by p, so there could only be finitely many prime placements (only those including p itself). For example, the numbers in a k-tuple cannot take on all three values 0, 1, and 2 modulo 3; otherwise the resulting numbers would always include a multiple of 3 and therefore could not all be prime unless one of the numbers is 3 itself. A k-tuple that satisfies this condition (i.e. it does not have a p for which it covers all the different values modulo p) is called admissible.

It is conjectured that every admissible k-tuple matches infinitely many positions in the sequence of prime numbers. However, there is no admissible tuple for which this has been proven except the 1-tuple (0). Nevertheless, by Yitang Zhang's famous proof of 2013 it follows that there exists at least one 2-tuple which matches infinitely many positions.

Positions matched by inadmissible patterns[edit]

Although (0, 2, 4) is not admissible it does produce the single set of primes, (3, 5, 7).

Some inadmissible k-tuples have more than one all-prime solution. This cannot happen for a k-tuple that includes all values modulo 3, so to have this property a k-tuple must cover all values modulo a larger prime, implying that there are at least five numbers in the tuple. The shortest inadmissible tuple with more than one solution is the 5-tuple (0, 2, 8, 14, 26), which has two solutions: (3, 5, 11, 17, 29) and (5, 7, 13, 19, 31) where all congruences (mod 5) are included in both cases.

Prime constellations[edit]

The diameter of k-tuple is the difference of its largest and smallest elements. An admissible prime k-tuple with the smallest possible diameter d (among all admissible k-tuples) is a prime constellation. For all n ≥ k this will always produce consecutive primes.[2]

The first few prime constellations are:

k d Constellation smallest[3]
2 2 (0, 2) (3, 5)
3 6 (0, 2, 6)
(0, 4, 6)
(5, 7, 11)
(7, 11, 13)
4 8 (0, 2, 6, 8) (5, 7, 11, 13)
5 12 (0, 2, 6, 8, 12)
(0, 4, 6, 10, 12)
(5, 7, 11, 13, 17)
(7, 11, 13, 17, 19)
6 16 (0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16) (7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23)
7 20 (0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 18, 20)
(0, 2, 8, 12, 14, 18, 20)
(11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31)
(5639, 5641, 5647, 5651, 5653, 5657, 5659)
8 26 (0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 18, 20, 26)
(0, 2, 6, 12, 14, 20, 24, 26)
(0, 6, 8, 14, 18, 20, 24, 26)
(11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37)
(17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43)
(88793, 88799, 88801, 88807, 88811, 88813, 88817, 88819)
9 30 (0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 18, 20, 26, 30)
(0, 4, 6, 10, 16, 18, 24, 28, 30)
(0, 2, 6, 12, 14, 20, 24, 26, 30)
(0, 4, 10, 12, 18, 22, 24, 28, 30)
(11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41)
(13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43)
(17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47)
(88789, 88793, 88799, 88801, 88807, 88811, 88813, 88817, 88819)

A prime constellation is sometimes referred to as a prime k-tuplet, but some authors reserve that term for instances that are not part of longer k-tuplets.

The first Hardy–Littlewood conjecture predicts that the asymptotic frequency of any prime constellation can be calculated. While the conjecture is unproven it is considered likely to be true.

Prime arithmetic progressions[edit]

A prime k-tuple of the form (0, n, 2n, ...) is said to be a prime arithmetic progression. In order for such a k-tuple to meet the admissibility test, n must be a multiple of the primorial of k.[4]

References[edit]