Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries or Movie

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The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries or Movie is a retired category of Primetime Emmy Awards, given out to the best miniseries or television film between 2011 and 2013.

The award was created in 2011 when the Miniseries and Television Movie categories were merged. The merger was largely due to the decline in miniseries production in the past decade. In the final ten years of the miniseries category, it was able to fill all five nomination slots only twice, with the final two ceremonies only having two nominees. [1] However, in 2014, the decision was reversed, and the separate Miniseries and Television Movie categories were reinstated.[2]

Winners and nominees[edit]

The following tables, divided by decade, display the winners and nominees, according to the Primetime Emmy Awards database.

2010s[edit]

Year Program Producers Network
2010-2011
(63rd)[3]
Downton Abbey Gareth Neame, Rebecca Eaton, and Julian Fellowes, executive producers; Tony To, Graham Yost, Eugene Kelly, and Bruce C. McKenna, co-executive producer; Nigel Marchant, producer; Liz Trubridge, series producer; PBS
Cinema Verite Gavin Polone and Zanne Devine, executive producers; Karyn McCarthy, producer HBO
The Kennedys Jonathan Koch, Steve Michaels, Jon Cassar, Stephen Kronish, Michael Prupas, Jamie Paul Rock, Joel Surnow, David McKillop, Dirk Hoogstra, Christine Shipton, and Tara Ellis, executive producers; Brian Gibson, supervising producer ReelzChannel
Mildred Pierce Christine Vachon, Pamela Koffler, John Wells, and Todd Haynes, executive producers; Ilene S. Landress, co-executive producer HBO
The Pillars of the Earth David A. Rosemont, Jonas Bauer, Tim Halkin, Michael Prupas, David W. Zucker, Rola Bauer, Ridley Scott, and Tony Scott, executive producers; John Ryan, producer Starz
Too Big to Fail Curtis Hanson, Paula Weinstein, and Jeffrey Levine, executive producers; Carol Fenelon, co-executive producer; Ezra Swerdlow, producer HBO
2011-2012
(64th)[4]
Game Change Tom Hanks, Gary Goetzman, and Jay Roach, executive producers; Danny Strong and Steven Shareshian, co-executive producers; Amy Sayres, produced by HBO
American Horror Story Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Dante Di Loreto, executive producers FX
Hatfields & McCoys Leslie Greif, Nancy Dubuc, and Dirk Hoogstra, executive producers; Barry Berg, supervising producer; Kevin Costner, Darrell Fetty, Herb Nanas, producer by; and Vlad Paunescu, producer History
Hemingway & Gellhorn Peter Kaufman, Trish Hofmann, James Gandolfini, Alexandra Ryan, and Barbara Turner, executive producers; Nancy Sanders and Mark Armstrong, co-executive producer HBO
Luther Phillippa Giles, executive producer; Katie Swinden, producer BBC America
Sherlock: "A Scandal in Belgravia" Beryl Vertue, Steven Moffat, Mark Gatiss, Rebecca Eaton, and Bethan Jones, executive producers; Sue Vertue, produced by PBS
2012-2013
(65th)[5]
Behind the Candelabra Jerry Weintraub, executive producer; Gregory Jacobs, Susan Ekins, and Michael Polaire, producers HBO
American Horror Story: Asylum Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Dante Di Loreto, and Tim Minear, executive producers; Jennifer Salt, James Wong, Jessica Sharzer, and Bradley Buecker, co-executive producers; and Alexis Martin Woodall, producer FX
The Bible Mark Burnett, Roma Downey, Richard Bedser, Nancy Dubuc, Dirk Hoogstra, Julian P. Hobbs, executive producers History
Phil Spector Barry Levinson, and David Mamet, executive producers; and Michael Hausman, produced by HBO
Political Animals Greg Berlanti, Laurence Mark, and Sarah Caplan, executive producers; and Melissa Kellner Berman, co-executive producer USA
Top of the Lake Emile Sherman, Iain Canning, and Jane Campion, executive producers; and Philippa Campbell, produced by Sundance Channel

Total awards[edit]

  • HBO – 2
  • PBS – 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]