Primo Victoria

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Primo Victoria
Studio album by Sabaton
Released March 4, 2005
Recorded Abyss Studios, Sweden
Genre Power metal
Length 41:10
Label Black Lodge Records
Producer Tommy Tägtgren
Sabaton chronology
Fist for Fight
(2000)
Primo Victoria
(2005)
Attero Dominatus
(2006)
Re-Armed edition
Front cover of the 2010 reissue

Primo Victoria (Latin "Victory first") is the second album by Swedish power metal band Sabaton. This was the first album they released for their new label, Black Lodge Records.

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Theme Length
1. "Primo Victoria"   Operation Overlord 4:10
2. "Reign of Terror"   Saddam Hussein and Operation Desert Storm 3:51
3. "Panzer Battalion"   Operation Iraqi Freedom 5:09
4. "Wolfpack"   Wolf pack Hecht's attack on convoy ON 92 in the battle of the Atlantic 5:55
5. "Counterstrike"   The Six-Day War 3:48
6. "Stalingrad"   The battle of Stalingrad 5:18
7. "Into the Fire"   The use of napalm in the Vietnam War 3:25
8. "Purple Heart"   People awarded the Purple Heart 5:07
9. "Metal Machine"   A tribute to heavy metal 4:22
Total length:
41:10

Album line-up[edit]

"Second Battalion"[edit]

  • The band was commissioned by members of the Norwegian Army 2nd Battalion to make an alternative version of Panzer Battalion. The alternate version, called Second Battalion, differs only in that the lyric "Second Battalion" is sung in place of "panzer battalion".[citation needed]

Joakim's message[edit]

On the reverse side of the Primo Victoria Re-Armed vinyl side C sleeve, Joakim leaves a section called "How we made our "debut album"" which reads as follows:

This album is really the beginning of Sabaton as most of you know us today, from both a musical and lyrical point of view. We recorded Primo Victoria back in early 2004 and since we didn't have a record label we paid for it ourselves and returned to Studio Abyss and Tommy Tägtgren to record our new tracks.

As some of you might know, we had recorded the Metalizer album in 2002 and it had still not been released by our first record label and we were really hungry for revenge. During the 2 years we had waited for Metalizer to be released we had basically done nothing else than rehearse, play shows, write new songs and then rehearse some more, with the result that we entered the studio as more experienced musicians and more confidence than ever before. The recording and mixing of the album was done in about a month and even though we never had too much time on our hands we were never too stressed to experiment and try out new ideas.

From a personal point of view I really look back on this recording with joy and happiness since this album really defined us as a band and we had lots of fun while recording it.

Writing lyrics was a bigger challenge now that we had decided to make an album about war and that demanded much more research than a song about beer, metal or dragons, but on the other hand it was more rewarding and easier to connect to the songs emotionally. I clearly remember certain moments like when I after reading Antony Beevor's massive book about Stalingrad still stood there without inspiration and just thought, fuck this! – and took a few pages from a russian soldiers diary written during the battle and locked myself into the studio on my own in the night and improvised the lyrics and some of the melodies right there on the spot.

Pär and I worked out the system we still use for writing lyrics during this recording, Oskar and Rikard laid down their best guitar solos so far and the crazy afterparty with brothers Tommy and Peter Tägtgren ended up with our dear drummer Daniel having a 3-day hangover and not being able to drink wine for 5 years.

And yes, I really wrote the lyrics to "Metal Machine" in the bathroom, on toilet paper, with a cardboard beer crate as support! / Joakim

External links[edit]