Prince Constantine Constantinovich of Russia

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Prince Constantine Constantinovich
Konstantin Konstantinovich of Russia.jpg
House House of Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Father Grand Duke Constantine Constantinovich of Russia
Mother Princess Elisabeth of Saxe-Altenburg
Born (1891-01-01)1 January 1891
Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
Died 18 July 1918(1918-07-18) (aged 27)
Alapayevsk, Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

Prince Constantine Constantinovich of Russia (Константин Константинович) (1 January 1891 – 18 July 1918), nicknamed Kostia by the family, was the fourth child of Grand Duke Constantine Constantinovich of Russia by his wife Elisbeth Mavrikievna née HH Princess Elisabeth of Saxe-Altenburg.

The Prince was a silent, shy person who fancied theatre and was educated in the Corps des Pages, a military academy in Saint Petersburg. He served in the army during the First World War. A priest who met him at the front, Hegumen Seraphim, wrote: "He was an extremely modest officer of the Guard of the Izmaylovsky Regiment, much beloved by officers and soldiers alike; along with them he was a brave soldier who distinguished himself. I personally remember seeing him in the trenches among the soldiers, risking his life."

After seeing the happiness of his two elder siblings, John and Tatiana, Constantine was keen to start his own family. He fancied the Tsar's oldest daughter, Olga, but was also keen on Princess Elisabeth of Romania. Elisabeth's grandmother, the former Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia, wrote to her daughter, the Crown Princess Marie of Romania in 1911, saying, "The young Kostia is seized now with terror that she will be snatched away, as he says, before he has even made her acquaintance. The young man seems really quite nice, is much liked in his regiment, and they have really been very well brought up. This one is full of life...if you have nothing against this youth coming on a passing visit, will you telegraph to me." However, the request was denied on political grounds, as Prince John was married to Helen of Serbia, and Constantine never did find the marriage he longed for.

In March 1918 he was exiled to the Urals by the Bolsheviks and murdered in a mineshaft near Alapayevsk, along with his brothers Prince John Constantinovich and Prince Igor Constantinovich, his cousin Prince Vladimir Pavlovich Paley and other relatives and friends. His body was eventually buried in the Russian Orthodox Church cemetery in Beijing, which was destroyed years later to build a park.

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