Prince of Chernigov

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The Prince of Chernigov was the kniaz, the ruler or sub-ruler, of the Rus' Principality of Chernigov, a lordship which lasted four centuries straddling what are now parts of Ukraine, Belarus and the Russian Federation.

List of princes of Chernigov[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Dimnik, Martin. The Dynasty of Chernigov - 1146-1246. 
  2. ^ Other source suggests that Yaroslav II Vsevolodovich ruled from 1181 ([1], retrieved on 2009-04-13), but his brother Svyatoslav Vsevolodovich became grand prince of Kiev in 1176 and promoted him to Chernihiv; Dimnik, Martin op. cit. p 137.
  3. ^ a b A number of historians claim Igor Svyatoslavich died in 1202 ([2], retrieved on 2009-04-13); he most probably died in the spring of 1201, because most chronicles place the news of his death as the first entry for the year; Dimnik, Martin op. cit p. 237.
  4. ^ a b Some historians claim Gleb Svyatoslavich died in 1219 ([3], retrieved on 2009-04-13); he was last mentioned under 1215 and he died between 1215 and 1220; Dimnik, Martin op. cit p. 291.
  5. ^ Under the year 1261, the chronicles report that prince Vasilko Romanovich of Volodymyr-Volynskyi gave away his daughter Olga as wife to Andrey Vsevolodovich of Chernigov. Based on this report, some historians claim that Andrey Vsevolodovich was the prince of Chernigov between 1245 and 1261 ([4], retrieved on 2009-04-13). However, the chronicler's identification of Andrey as a prince of Chernigov merely signified that he was an Olgovich (a member of the dynasty of Chernigov); Dimnik, Martin op. cit p. 380.
  6. ^ The Lyubetskiy sinodik speaks of a certain "Lavrenty Vsevolod Yaropolchi"; R. V. Zotov suggests that Vsevolod succeeded Mikhail Vsevolodovich to Chernigov from 1246 to 1263(see also: [5], retrieved on 2009-04-13); the chronicles, however, do not support Zotov's assertions; Dimnik, Martin op. cit p. 380.

Sources[edit]

  • Dimnik, Martin (1994). The Dynasty of Chernigov, 1054–1146. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. ISBN 0-88844-116-9. 
  • Franklin, Simon; Shepard, Jonathan (1996). The Emergence of Rus 750–1200. Longman. ISBN 0-582-49091X. 
  • Martin, Janet (1993). Medieval Russia, 980–1584. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-67636-6. 
  • Vernadsky, George (1948). A History of Russia, Volume II: Kievan Russia. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-01647-6. 

External links[edit]