Princess Amelia (ship)

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The Princess Amelia was a Dutch merchant ship of 600 tons (bm) and 38 guns in the service of the Dutch West India Company.[1]

During its 1647 arrival to and departure from New Netherland, it was commanded by Jan Claesen Bol, who was twenty eight at the time. The ship carried Petrus Stuyvesant, the new Director-General of New Netherland, his wife Judith Bayard, and Stuyvesant’s councilors to Manhattan, where they landed May 1647. During its time in port, Captain Bol sat in council with Stuyvesant and others in New Amsterdam.[1]

Setting sail from Manhattan to Amsterdam on August 16, 1647, it was loaded with 200,000 pounds of dyewood from Curaçao and around 14,000 beaver pelts. It was also carrying 107 passengers and crew, including the recently fired Director Willem Kieft for his return to Amsterdam to defend himself against the charges leveled by among others, the Rev. Everardus Bogardus, the colony’s principal Dutch Reformed dominie, and banished colonists Jochem Pietersen Kuyter and Cornelis Melyn, who would also have to answer charges of insubordination for their role in Kieft’s ouster, and numerous Dutch West India Company soldiers who had recently arrived in Manhattan from Brazil and the Caribbean.

On September 27, 1647, Captain Bol mistook the Bristol Channel for the English Channel and ran the ship aground off Mumbles Point, Wales, near Swansea, Wales, (51°34′23″N 3°59′57″W / 51.573°N 3.9992°W / 51.573; -3.9992) where the ship broke apart.[1] Twenty-one of the 107 passengers survived, including Kuyter and Melyn, who later reported that Kieft had acknowledged his administrative mistakes before drowning. The Rev. Bogardus and most of the soldiers also drowned. Insurance claims and lawsuits lasted for years settling the loss claims.[2]

Early popular sources describe the event thus:

Kieft returned to Holland in a ship that was packed from stem to stern with the finest of furs. The ship was wrecked at sea. Kieft was drowned, and the furs were lost. In the same ship was Everardus Bogardus (the minister who had married Annetje Jans), who was on his way to Holland on a mission relating to his church. The people of New Amsterdam mourned for their minister, but there was little sorrow felt for the Governor who had plunged the colony in war by his obstinate and cruel temper.

[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Russell Shorto, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America. First Edition. New York City: Vintage Books (a Division of Random House, 2004), p.179. ISBN 1-4000-7867-9
  2. ^ Russell Shorto, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America. First Edition. New York City: Vintage Books (a Division of Random House, 2004), p.191-192. ISBN 1-4000-7867-9
  3. ^ Charles Hemstreet, "CHAPTER V: WILLIAM KIEFT and the WAR with the INDIANS" Chap. in The Story of Manhattan, (New York City: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1901), Released as The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Story of Manhattan, by Charles Hemstreet, E-text prepared by Gregory Smith, David Garcia, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team