Princess Antoinette, Baroness of Massy

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Princess Antoinette
Baroness de Massy
Antonieta y Raniero.jpg
Princess Antoinette with her brother Prince Rainier.
Spouse Alexandre-Athenase Noghès
Jean-Charles Rey
John Gilpin
Issue Elisabeth-Anne de Massy
Christian Louis de Massy
Christine Alix de Massy
Full name
Antoinette Louise Alberte Suzanne Grimaldi
House House of Grimaldi (by birth)
Father Prince Pierre, Duke of Valentinois
Mother Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois
Born (1920-12-28)28 December 1920
Paris, France
Died 18 March 2011(2011-03-18) (aged 90)
Princess Grace Hospital, Monaco
Burial Chapel of Peace, Monaco

Princess Antoinette of Monaco, Baroness de Massy (Antoinette Louise Alberte Suzanne Grimaldi; 28 December 1920 – 18 March 2011) was a member of the princely family of Monaco and the elder sister of Prince Rainier III and aunt of Albert II, Prince of Monaco. Her parents were Count Pierre de Polignac and Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois.

She was born in Paris of French and Mexican ancestry.

Children[edit]

Princess Antoinette had a long-term liaison with Alexandre-Athenase Noghès, a Monegasque-born attorney and international tennis champion, in the mid-1940s. Three out-of-wedlock children were born from this union who were legitimated by their parents' eventual marriage and, henceforth, included in the line of succession to the Monegasque Throne until the death of Rainier III in 2005:

  • Elisabeth-Anne de Massy (born 1947).[1] Married twice with two children:
  • Christian Louis de Massy (Noghès) (born Monaco, 17 January 1949), married firstly in Buenos Aires, on 14 November 1970 and divorced in 1978 María Marta Quintana y del Carril (born London, 17 June 1951)[1] the daughter of Enrique Quintana y Achával, Ambassador of Argentina, and Marta del Carril, Duchess Consort of Tamames, by whom he had one daughter, Leticia;[1] married secondly in Ramatuelle on 11 September 1982 and divorced in 1987 Anne Michelle Lütken (28 November 1959 - London, 25 November 2001), without issue; married thirdly in Geneva Julia Lakschin (born November 6, 1968) on April 1992, without issue, and divorced in 1995; and married fourthly Cécile Gelabale (born Guadeloupe), and had one son, Antoine, and adopted another, Brice Gelabale:
    • Leticia Noghès (born Buenos Aires 16 May 1971), married to Jonkheer Thomas de Brouwer (born Antwerp, 22 March 1973),two children:[1]
      • Jonkvrouw Rose de Brouwer (2008)[1]
      • Jonkheer Sylvestre de Brouwer (2008)[1]
      • Jonkvrouw Lillah de Brouwer[1]
      • Jonkvrouw Hermine de Brouwer[1]
    • Brice Gelabale-Souleyman[2] (born 2 November 1987) [1]
    • Antoine Noghès (born 15 January 1997)[1][3]
  • Christine de Massy (Noghès) (Monaco, 8 July 1951 - Nice, 15 February 1989), married firstly in Monaco on 14 February 1972 and divorced in 1976 Charles Wayne Knecht, first cousin once removed of Princess Grace (born Philadelphia, 23 November 1944), and had one son, and married secondly on 25 March 1988 Leon Leroy, without issue:
    • Keith Sébastien Knecht (born Philadelphia, 1972), married in July 1999 Donatella Dugaginy, four children:[1]
      • Christine (2000)[1]
      • Alexia (2001)[1]
      • Vittoria (2007)[1]
      • Andrea (2008)[1]

Marriages[edit]

  1. Princess Antoinette and Alexandre Noghès subsequently married in Genoa on 4 December 1951 (her first, his second) and divorced in 1954.
    On 15 November 1951, Antoinette was created Baroness of Massy (Baronne de Massy). Her children (Elisabeth-Anne, Christian and Christine) were named Grimaldi at birth. They subsequently had their names changed to de Massy. They claim the title of Baron/Baroness through their mother, but they are not entitled to it.[4]
  2. She married her second husband, Dr. Jean-Charles Rey (Monaco, 22 October 1914 - Monaco, 17 September 1994), president of the Conseil National, the Parlement de Monaco in The Hague on 2 December 1961 and they divorced in 1974.
  3. Her third and last husband was John Gilpin (Southsea, Hampshire, 10 February 1930 - London, 5 September 1983), a British ballet dancer, whom she married in Monaco on 28 July 1983. He died suddenly six weeks later.

Titles and styles[edit]

  • 1920 – 1951: Her Serene Highness Princess Antoinette of Monaco.
  • 1951 – 2011: Her Serene Highness Princess Antoinette of Monaco, Baroness de Massy.

Honours[edit]

Life account[edit]

Having divorced Noghès, she and her lover Jean-Charles Rey hatched a plan to depose her brother Rainier III, Prince of Monaco and declare herself regent on the basis of having a son who would one day inherit the throne. She circulated rumours that Rainier's fiancee, actress Gisèle Pascal, was infertile. This led to the breakup of the relationship.[6]

Rainier's marriage to Grace Kelly in 1956 and the arrival of his heirs, Princess Caroline in 1957 and Prince Albert in 1958, effectively scuttled Antoinette's plans. She was removed from the Palace by her sister-in-law, Princess Grace, and thereafter was estranged from the princely family for many years.

She was known to be somewhat eccentric, even having been described as "completely mad" by her servants. Having been banished from Monaco in the late 1950s, she lived down the coast from Monaco at Èze, with a large collection of dogs and cats. She was the president of Monaco's Society for the Protection of Animals.[7]

Upon the accession of Albert II in 2005, Antoinette and her descendants lost their place in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne,[7] the throne being limited to the current sovereign's descendants, siblings and descendants of his or her siblings.

The Princess Antoinette Park in Monaco's La Condamine district was named in her honour.[8]

Death[edit]

On 18 March 2011 Princess Antoinette died at The Princess Grace Hospital Centre, aged 90.[7] Her funeral took place on 24 March 2011. She is buried in the Chapel of Peace, in the Cathédrale Notre-Dame-Immaculée in Monaco beside her parents, her daughter Christine Alix, and her last husband John Brian Gilpin.

Ancestry[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Palace: My Life in the Royal Family of Monaco by Baron Christian de Massy & Charles Higham (1986, Atheneum, ISBN 0-689-11636-5)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Monaco". 
  2. ^ Permission for change of surname
  3. ^ "pear". 
  4. ^ Christian de Massy (1986) Palace: My Life in the Royal Family of Monaco, Bodley Head, London ISBN 0425117766
  5. ^ In this photo, Antoinette wearing the Order of Saint Charles
  6. ^ "Princess Antoinette of Monaco". Telegraph. 2011-03-27. Retrieved 2012-02-16. 
  7. ^ a b c Death of Princess Antoinette
  8. ^ "Princess Antoinette Park". Visit Monaco - Princess Antoinette Park. Visit Monaco. Retrieved 25 May 2013.