Princess Françoise of Orléans (1844–1925)

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This article is about the duchess consort of Chartres. For her granddaughter and wife of Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark, see Princess Françoise of Orléans (1902–1953).
Françoise of Orléans
Duchess of Chartres
Francoise, duchesse de chartres. jpg.jpg
Spouse Robert, Duke of Chartres
Issue Marie, Princess Valdemar of Denmark
Prince Robert
Prince Henri
Marguerite, Duchess of Magenta
Jean, Duke of Guise
Full name
Françoise Marie Amélie d'Orléans
House House of Orléans
Father François of Orléans
Mother Francisa of Brazil
Born (1844-08-14)14 August 1844
Neuilly-sur-Seine, France
Died 28 October 1925(1925-10-28) (aged 81)
Château de Saint-Firmin, France
Religion Roman Catholicism

Françoise of Orléans (Françoise Marie Amélie; 14 August 1844 – 28 October 1925) was a member of the House of Orléans and by marriage Duchess of Chartres.

Princess of Orléans[edit]

Françoise d'Orléans was born in Neuilly-sur-Seine the daughter of Prince François, Prince of Joinville (son of King Louis Philippe I), and of Princess Francisca of Brazil (daughter of Emperor Peter I of Brazil).

Duchess of Chartres[edit]

On 11 June 1863, in Kingston upon Thames, England, she married her first cousin Prince Robert, Duke of Chartres. They had five children. Princess Françoise died in Château de Saint-Firmin.

Issue[edit]

Princess Marguerite d'Orléans and Prince Jean d'Orléans (Gabriel Ferrier, 1880)

Ancestry[edit]

Titles, styles, honours and arms[edit]

Titles and styles[edit]

  • 14 August 1844 – 11 June 1863 Her Royal Highness Princess Françoise of Orléans
  • 11 June 1863 – 5 December 1910 Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Chartres
  • 5 December 1910 – 28 October 1925 Her Royal Highness the Dowager Duchess of Chartres

Bibliography[edit]

  • (French) Dominique Paoli, Fortunes et infortunes des princes d'Orléans 1848-1918, Artena, Paris, 2006.
  • (French) Jean-Charles Volkmann, Généalogie des rois et des princes, Éditions Jean-Paul Gisserot, Paris, 1998.