Princess Iwa

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Princess Iwa (磐之媛命 Iwa no hime mikoto?), sometimes known as Empress Iwa no hime (磐姫皇后 Iwa no hime kōgō?), was a poet and the Empress consort of Emperor Nintoku, who was the 16th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.[1] She was a descendant of Emperor Kōgen.[citation needed]

No firm dates can be assigned to Emperor Nintoku's life or reign, nor to that of his first wife. Nintoku is considered to have ruled the country during the late-fourth century and early-fifth century, but there is a paucity of information about him. There is insufficient material available for further verification and study.[citation needed]

Princess Iwa's poetry, or poems attributed to her, are included in the Kojiki, the Nihon shoki and the Man'yōshū. Her tomb is said to be located in Nara Prefecture.

Literature[edit]

Poems which Iwa-no hime is said to have exchanged with her husband are related in the Kojiki and in the Nihon shoki.[2] Nintoku is reported to have suffered the resentment of the Iwa-no hime during a period in which he stopped the collection of taxes, which meant that even ordinary repairs to the palace were also deferred.[3]

Poetry attributed to Iwa is collected in the Man'yōshū,[2] the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry believed to have been collected by Ōtomo no Yakamochi (大伴 家持). In her four songs she expressed love and longing for her husband.[4] Some modern scholars, however, advise a healthy skepticism in these difficult to verify attributions.[5]

Longing for Emperor Nintoku (君が行き 日長くなりぬ 山たずね 迎へか行かむ 待ちにか待たむ).[6]

Burial mound tomb[edit]

The Imperial tomb of Iwa-no hime no Mikoto is said to be located in Saki-chō in the city of Nara.[8] Both kofun-type Imperial tombs are characterized by a keyhole-shaped island located within a wide, water-filled moat.[9]

Issue[edit]

  • Prince Ooe no Izahowake (大兄去来穂別尊) Emperor Richū
  • Prince Suminoe no Nakatsu (住吉仲皇子)
  • Prince Mizuhawake (瑞歯別尊) Emperor Hanzei
  • Prince Oasatsuma wakugo no Sukune (雄朝津間稚子宿禰尊) Emperor Ingyō

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, pp. 22-24; Varley, Paul. (1980). Jinnō Shōtōki, pp. 110-111.
  2. ^ a b Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric and Käthe Roth. (2005). "Iwa no Hime," Japan encyclopedia, p. 409.
  3. ^ Brownlee, John S. and Tarō Sakamoto. (1991). The Six National Histories of Japan, p. 64.
  4. ^ Sato. p. 16.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ Hall, John Whitney et al. (1993). The Cambridge History of Japan: Ancient Japan, p. 474.
  6. ^ Poem No. 2-85, Man'yōshū Best 100;
  7. ^ Cranston, Edwin A. (1998). A Waka Anthology: The Gem-Glistening Cup, p. 51.
  8. ^ Iwa-no hime no Mikoto's misasagi -- map (upper right)
  9. ^ see kofun context of kofun-like elements

References[edit]

See also[edit]