Princeton High School (Sharonville, Ohio)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Princeton High School
Vikinglogo.jpg
Address
100 Viking Way
Cincinnati, Ohio, 45246
United States
Coordinates 39°16′22″N 84°26′35″W / 39.27278°N 84.44306°W / 39.27278; -84.44306Coordinates: 39°16′22″N 84°26′35″W / 39.27278°N 84.44306°W / 39.27278; -84.44306
Information
Type Public, Coeducational high school
Established 1959
School district Princeton City School District
Superintendent Ed Theroux (interim)[1]
Principal Charles Ogdan[2]
Grades 9-12
Campus Suburban
Color(s) Scarlet and Gray [3]         
Fight song "Go Princeton Go"
Athletics conference Greater Miami Conference[3]
Nickname Vikings
Rival Fairfield Indians
Accreditation North Central Association of Colleges and Schools [4]
Yearbook Student Prince
Website
Aerial view

Princeton High School, located in Sharonville, Ohio, is a public, co-educational high school and part of the Princeton City Schools system.

Princeton High School serves grades nine through twelve, and it has been educating students from the Cincinnati metropolitan area communities of Evendale, Glendale, Lincoln Heights, Springdale, Sharonville, Woodlawn, and portions of Blue Ash, Deerfield Township, West Chester Township, and Springfield Township since its establishment in 1955.[5]

Princeton High School is situated near the intersection of interstates 75 and 275 at 100 Viking Way. Princeton High School offers a full slate of advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses – as well as technology, music, and athletic programs. Princeton High School is accredited by the North Central Association.[5]

History[edit]

Princeton High School was established in 1955 and graduated its first class in 1959. In 1955, the school districts of Woodlawn, Glendale, Springdale, Crescentville, Sharonville, Runyan, Stewart and Evendale consolidated to form the Princeton City School District – taking its name from the prevalent PR phone prefix used in the area and from Princeton Pike. Princeton High School was built on its current site in 1957-58.[6]

In 1970, the Ohio State Board of Education merged the predominantly white Princeton High School and the predominantly black Lincoln Heights High School,[7] bringing Princeton City School District to its current boundaries.[5] In 2010, plans were introduced to build a campus that would house both Princeton High School and the Princeton Community Middle School.[8] The New Campus opened in 2014.[9]

Students[edit]

As of the 2012-13 school year, enrollment at Princeton High School stood at 1,560 students, and district-wide enrollment was 5,650.

Princeton High School hosts one of only 22 International Baccalaureate Diploma Programs available in Ohio and the only one found locally. There are over 125 students who have graduated with a full International Baccalaureate (IB).

Academics[edit]

Princeton High School is one of very few schools in the state of Ohio to offer both an International Baccalaureate (IB) – typically graduating an average of ten full diploma and fifteen partial diploma recipients each year – and Advanced Placement (AP) – with more than two hundred students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses in an average year. From each graduating class, approximately one in four sits for an Advanced Placement examination during their career at Princeton High School. In a typical year, Princeton High School administers over 400 AP or IB examinations.

The IB program was begun in 1984 and has since expanded to include numerous course offerings:

  • English HL
  • French SL
  • Spanish SL
  • History of the Americas HL
  • Biology HL
  • Physics SL, HL
  • Mathematics SL, HL
  • Computer Science SL
  • Music Solo Performance SL
  • Theater SL
  • Visual Arts A SL
  • Visual Arts B SL

The AP program coexists with the IB program, offering nine full AP courses:

  • German
  • Psychology
  • World History
  • Human Geography
  • Government
  • Chemistry
  • Calculus AB
  • Computer Science
  • Art


Extracurricular Activities[edit]

Princeton offers a wide variety of extracurricular activities including - academic challenge team, baseball, basketball, bowling, cheerleading, chess, cross country, debate, diving, American football, golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field, volleyball, water polo and wrestling.

With regard to competitive activities, Princeton High School was a founding member of the Greater Miami Conference and its students have won numerous team titles:

Princeton High School also has non-athletic extracurricular activities and clubs:

  • Art Club
  • Forensics
  • Girls' Group
  • Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA)
  • HOPE (Help Our Planet Earth) Club
  • Junior Council on World Affairs
  • Key Club
  • National Honor Society
  • Photo Club
  • Princeton NJROTC (Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps)
  • Odin's Word (monthly student magazine)
  • Omega Photography Club
  • Shades of Gray (quarterly literary magazine)
  • Student Council
  • Thespians
  • Vikings

Music[edit]

The music program at Princeton High School offers a wide range of performance and non-performance options for students. In a typical year, over 25% of the high school student population participates in the Princeton music program, approximately twice the national average.

Performing ensembles include the following:

  • Pride of Princeton Marching Band
  • Symphonic Band ("A" band)
  • Concert Band
  • Wind Ensemble
  • Jazz Band
  • Jazz Ensemble
  • Cadet Band
  • Symphonic Orchestra
  • Concert Orchestra
  • Pit Orchestra
  • A Cappella Choir ("AA" choir)
  • Choraliers for Women
  • Chorale for Men
  • Basketball Pep Band
  • Football Pep Band
  • Princeton High School Gospel Choir (non-credit)

Additionally, students may enroll in the following non-performance options:

  • Piano Lab
  • Guitar
  • Music in Society

Within these organizations, instructors provide private music lessons using mobile instructors who specialize in a particular instrument. These teachers provide students with private lessons in a variety of instruments including voice. The students are able to attend private teaching during ensemble rehearsal or throughout their day if a period is open.

The music program has received state and national recognition, including the Exemplary Program Award from the Music Educators National Conference, and recognition as a Grammy Signature School. Princeton ensembles have performed several times at the Ohio Music Education Association Conference, and the A Cappella Choir was recently selected to perform at the rededication of the Ohio Supreme Court building.[citation needed]

Princeton ensembles have also performed at a variety of travel destinations, including Constitution Hall in Washington, Walt Disney World, and the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, as well as on tours in Toronto and Hawaii.

Beyond school ensembles, Princeton students also perform in many select and honors music organizations, including District Honors Band and Choir, Southwest Regional Orchestra, Blue Ash Youth Symphony, Cincinnati Symphony Youth Orchestra, May Festival Youth Chorus, and All-State Band, Orchestra, Choir, and Jazz Ensemble.

Community involvement[edit]

In attempting to produce well-rounded graduates, Princeton High School also encourages community involvement by both staff and students. In 2000 Princeton High School began involvement in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Pennies for Patients campaign – renamed Pasta for Pennies in certain markets in which the Olive Garden restaurant provides sponsorship. In that first year, Princeton High School raised $7,000 through the efforts of the Key Club. In subsequent years, the campaign has grown in scope, seeing Princeton finish second in the nation – behind Orange High School in California – each year from 2001–2004, raising as much as $40,015.65 in 2004. Then in 2005 Princeton High School became the top fund-raising school in the nation by raising $35,074.95 and toppling Orange High School. Princeton High School was again the top fund-raising school in the nation in this campaign in 2008, when they raised over $46,000 during the three-week campaign.[16]

Princeton High School staff and students are also active in other charitable endeavors, hosting an annual Relay For Life since 2003. This event has also seen growth, raising as much as $38,000 from one overnight Relay event.

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Princeton City Schools. "School website". Retrieved 2014-12-16. 
  2. ^ Princeton City Schools. "School webpage". Retrieved 2014-12-16. 
  3. ^ a b OHSAA. "OHSAA Member Directory". Retrieved 2014-12-16. 
  4. ^ NCA-CASI. "NCA-Council on Accreditation and School Improvement". Retrieved 2010-03-16. [dead link]
  5. ^ a b c http://www.princeton.k12.oh.us/HighSchool.cfm?subpage=308
  6. ^ http://www.princeton.k12.oh.us/files/407/Princeton-history.pdf
  7. ^ Leigh, Patricia Randolph (2005). Fly in the Ointment: School Segregation and Desegregation in the Ohio Valley. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. p. Back Cover Summary. ISBN 0-8204-6712-X. Retrieved 3 December 2014. 
  8. ^ http://www.princeton.k12.oh.us/district.cfm?subpage=865
  9. ^ http://www.princeton.k12.oh.us/files/710/princeton%20milestones%20schedule.pdf
  10. ^ a b c OHSAA. "Ohio High School Athletic Association Web site". Retrieved 2006-12-31. 
  11. ^ Yappi. "Yappi Sports Basketball AA". Retrieved 2007-02-12. 
  12. ^ OHSAA. "OHSAA tournament brackets". Retrieved 2014-05-13. 
  13. ^ Yappi. "Yappi Sports Football". Retrieved 2007-02-12. 
  14. ^ OTCA. "Ohio Tennis Coaches' Association Web site". Retrieved 2007-03-08. 
  15. ^ OHSSCA. "Ohio High School Swim Coaches' Association-Boys Water Polo State Champions". Retrieved 2007-03-08. [dead link]
  16. ^ LLS. "Top 100 Pasta for Pennies schools, 2008". Retrieved 2008-08-20. 
  17. ^ www.basketball-reference.com. "Erik Daniels NBA & ABA Statistics". Retrieved 2011-02-27. 

External links[edit]