Princeton Junction, New Jersey

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Princeton Junction is the name of a New Jersey Transit and Amtrak station on the Northeast Corridor line.
Princeton Junction, New Jersey
Census-designated place
Map of Princeton Junction highlighted within Mercer County. Inset: Location of Mercer County in New Jersey.
Map of Princeton Junction highlighted within Mercer County. Inset: Location of Mercer County in New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°19′24″N 74°37′16″W / 40.323294°N 74.621157°W / 40.323294; -74.621157Coordinates: 40°19′24″N 74°37′16″W / 40.323294°N 74.621157°W / 40.323294; -74.621157
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Township West Windsor
Area[1]
 • Total 1.853 sq mi (4.801 km2)
 • Land 1.826 sq mi (4.730 km2)
 • Water 0.027 sq mi (0.071 km2)  1.48%
Elevation[2] 60 ft (22 m)
Population (2010 Census)[3]
 • Total 2,465
 • Density 1,349.8/sq mi (521.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08550[4]
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3460960[1][5]
GNIS feature ID 02389708[1][6]

Princeton Junction is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community located within West Windsor Township, in Mercer County, New Jersey.[7] As of the 2010 United States Census, the CDP's population was 2,465.[3]

Geography[edit]

Princeton Junction is located at 40°19′24″N 74°37′16″W / 40.323294°N 74.621157°W / 40.323294; -74.621157 (40.323294,-74.621157). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP had a total area of 1.853 square miles (4.801 km2), of which, 1.826 square miles (4.730 km2) of it is land and 0.027 square miles (0.071 km2) of it (1.48%) is water.[1][8]

Princeton Junction's name comes from the train station of the same name, now on the Amtrak and New Jersey Transit Northeast Corridor. The station is the junction between this main line and a spur line (served by the "Dinky" train run by New Jersey Transit) to Princeton itself.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 2,362
2000 2,382 0.8%
2010 2,465 3.5%
Population sources: 2000[9] 2010[3]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,465 people, 921 households, and 696.3 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,349.8 per square mile (521.2 /km2). There were 940 housing units at an average density of 514.7 per square mile (198.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 74.81% (1,844) White, 2.43% (60) Black or African American, 0.16% (4) Native American, 18.62% (459) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.42% (35) from other races, and 2.56% (63) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.44% (134) of the population.[3]

There were 921 households, of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.6% were married couples living together, 5.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.08.[3]

In the CDP, 25.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 23.0% from 25 to 44, 30.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.[3]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[5] there were 2,382 people, 842 households, and 681 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 491.8/km2 (1,276.9/mi2). There were 858 housing units at an average density of 177.2/km2 (460.0/mi2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 86.99% White, 2.02% African American, 0.13% Native American, 8.86% Asian, 0.76% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.06% of the population.[9]

There were 842 households out of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.0% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.1% were non-families. 15.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.14.[9]

In the CDP the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.4 males.[9]

The median income for a household in the CDP was $116,668, and the median income for a family was $127,617. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $58,750 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $44,113. None of the families and 1.5% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 5.3% of those over 64.[9]

Business and industry[edit]

At the turn of the century two of Princeton Junction's landmark retailers closed. One was Lick-It ice cream, a tiny kiosk-like yellow building that served ice cream to walk-in and drive-through customers, always including a trademark nonpareil in the ice cream. Also, the family-owned Lucar Hardware store shut down due to competition with superstores like Home Depot and Lowe's Hardware. Competition was not the only factor, however. The owners sought to retire, and the land had become more valuable. The site is now occupied by PNC Bank.

In 2008-2009 Princeton Junction saw the further closure of a number of businesses that had been longtime fixtures. Among the most significant is the closure of an Acme Supermarket, which has been an anchor tenant in the Windsor Plaza Shopping Center for 50 years. Other closures (of Chicken Holiday fast food shop, a paint store and an Asian restaurant) were prompted to make way for the construction of a new Rite Aid store.

Some observers blame the 'deterioration' of the central Princeton Junction area on a lack of political consensus.[10]

Noted residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  2. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Princeton Junction Census Designated Place, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Princeton Junction CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  4. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hamilton Square, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  5. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  6. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  7. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  8. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  9. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Princeton Junction CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 20, 2012.
  10. ^ http://wwpinfo.com/index.php?option=com_us1more&Itemid=6&key=10-23-2009+crawford&more=1&action=comment
  11. ^ Staff. "Jersey Man to Head Scouts", The New York Times, October 21, 1984. Accessed November 21, 2012. "Mr. Love, who is 54 years old and lives in Princeton Junction, N.J., has headed the organization's Northeast region, based in Dayton, N.J."
  12. ^ "Christopher McQuarrie', The New York Times. Accessed November 21, 2012. "Born in Princeton Junction, NJ, in 1968, McQuarrie attended high school with future collaborator Bryan Singer before relocating to Australia following graduation to work at a boarding school."
  13. ^ "LCD Soundsystem's James Murphy on Bringing Back New York's Disco Days -- New York Magazine"
  14. ^ Blakinger, Mary. "After 30 Years, He Beat A Disease Winner Of Nobel Prize Has Another Amazing Feat.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 9, 2000. Accessed November 21, 2012. "These days, Nash, who lives in Princeton Junction, is a senior research mathematician at Princeton University."
  15. ^ Weinraub, Bernard. "FILM; An Unusual Choice for the Role of Studio Superhero", The New York Times, July 9, 2000. Accessed November 21, 2012. "As a child, Mr. Singer grew up in Princeton Junction, N.J."
  16. ^ Longsdorf, Amy. "`SUSPECTS' DIRECTOR TWISTS THE TWIST", The Morning Call, September 10, 1995. Accessed November 21, 2012. "Though "Suspects" is set in New York and Los Angeles, Singer is a Jersey boy through and through. He grew up in Princeton Junction, the adopted son of an environmental activist mom and Maidenform exec dad."