Independent clause

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An independent clause (or main clause) is a clause that can stand by itself, also known as a simple sentence. An independent clause contains a subject and a predicate; it makes sense by itself.

Independent clauses can be joined by using a semicolon or by using a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so).

Examples[edit]

  • I drive a bus. (This is a simple sentence.)
  • I am a doctor, and my wife is a lawyer. (This is a compound sentence made up of two independent clauses: I am a doctor and my wife is a lawyer.)
  • I want to be a nurse, but I need to receive my science degree. (compound sentence made up of two independent clauses: I want to be a nurse and I need to receive my science degree)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Rozakis, Laurie (2003). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Grammar and Style pp. 152. Alpha. ISBN 1-59257-115-8. 

External links[edit]