Principles of Neural Science

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Principles of Neural Science cover

First published in 1981 by Elsevier, Principles of Neural Science is an influential neuroscience textbook edited by Eric R. Kandel, James H. Schwartz, and Thomas M. Jessell. The original edition was 468 pages; now on the fifth edition, the book has grown to 1760 pages. The second edition was published in 1985, third in 1991, fourth in 2000. The fifth and latest edition was published on October 26th, 2012 and includes Steven A. Siegelbaum and A.J. Hudspeth as editors.[1]

Authors[edit]

Editors[edit]

  • Kandel was one of the recipients of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He is currently a professor of biochemistry, molecular biophysics, physiology, cellular biophysics, and psychiatry at Columbia University. He is a senior investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a recipient of the National Medal of Science.
  • Schwartz was a professor of physiology, cellular biophysics, neurology, and psychiatry at Columbia University.
  • Jessell became an editor of the book starting from the third edition. He is a professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Columbia University, and is also an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
  • Hudspeth is a professor of sensory neuroscience at Rockefeller University. He is also an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
  • Siegelbaum is Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Columbia University and is also an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Contributors[edit]

Including the editors—all of whom also contributed to individual chapters in the book—there are a total of 45 authors of this text. Included among them are several notable researchers and physicians. Several authors are also highly decorated scientists, including Nobel laureate Linda B. Buck and renowned neurophysiologist Roger M. Enoka.

Content[edit]

Principles of Neural Science is often assigned as a textbook for many undergraduate and graduate/medical neuroscience and neurobiology courses. The book attempts to at least introduce every aspect of our most modern understanding of the brain. The fifth edition is divided into sixty-seven chapters, organized into nine parts:

References[edit]