ProEnglish

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ProEnglish
Proenglishlogo.jpg
Motto The Nation's Leading Official English Advocates
Formation 1994
Type Public Policy
Headquarters 1601 N. Kent Street
Location
Executive Director Robert Vandervoort
Website www.proenglish.org

ProEnglish is an American non-profit lobbying organization that supports making English the only official language of the United States.

Background[edit]

Founded in 1994 by John Tanton under the name English Language Advocates and later renamed ProEnglish, ProEnglish's first project was defending an official English initiative passed by the voters of Arizona, after the State of Arizona declined to appeal a decision overturning the initiative in federal court. Its first Chairman was Robert D. Park and its Executive Director was K.C. McAlpin.[1][2]

In addition to conducting research on a wide variety of public education activities to advance its goals, ProEnglish has helped provide pro bono legal assistance to public and private agencies facing litigation or regulatory actions over language. ProEnglish also offers a free advocacy service from its website allowing its supporters to email, call, write, and fax their members of Congress.[3]

Leadership and structure[edit]

ProEnglish is a self-governing project of U.S. Inc., a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, with a two-star rating for organizational efficiency from Charity Navigator. Its leadership structure consists of a six member board, chaired by Dr. Rosalie Pedalino Porter. Robert Vandervoort is the organization's current Executive Director.[4]

ProEnglish shares Arlington County, Virginia office space with NumbersUSA.[5][6]

Projects[edit]

According to their website, ProEnglish is currently engaged in several long-term projects that promote the use of English as the sole unifying language of the United States. First among these is repealing Executive Order 13166, which states that any entity which receives federal funds must provide whatever services it offers in any foreign language spoken by anyone likely to receive those services.

ProEnglish Defends Arizona Nursing Student[edit]

As of December 2013, ProEnglish is defending a nursing student in a lawsuit against her former school, Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. The lawsuit alleges [7] that the student, Terri Bennett, was suspended from the college for nine months and verbally defamed because she asked that students in one of her classes be required to speak English. The case may go to trial in 2014. Arizona has a law declaring English the official language of the state.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Epstein, Aaron (November 29, 1996). "ARIZONA LAW THAT REQUIRES ENGLISH IS FACING A TEST IN COURT THE CHALLENGE TO THE ENGLISH-ONLY MEASURE INVOLVES FREE SPEECH. THE OUTCOME COULD HAVE A BROAD EFFECT.". Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A.3. 
  2. ^ Carpenter, Amanda (August 20, 2009). "HOT BUTTON". Washington Times. p. A.18. 
  3. ^ http://proenglish.org/about-us/mission
  4. ^ http://proenglish.org/about-us/the-board
  5. ^ Address of NumbersUSA
  6. ^ Address of ProEnglish
  7. ^ "AZComplaintOfficial". proenglish.org. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 

External links[edit]