Professional wrestling double-team maneuvers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In professional wrestling double-team maneuvers are executed by multiple wrestlers instead of one and typically are used by tag teams in tag team matches. Many of these maneuvers are combination of two throws, or submission holds. Most moves are known by the names that professional wrestlers give their "finishing move" (signature moves that usually result in a win) names. Occasionally, these names become popular and are used regardless of the wrestler performing the technique. Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Contents

Aided moves[edit]

These moves involve one wrestler actually performing the move to an opponent. An ally of the attacker will do something to make the move more effective. For example, a wrestler could perform a DDT on an opponent. However, an ally could lift the opponent' feet off the ground first, making it an Aided DDT, a much more effective variation of the move.

Aided brainbuster[edit]

An aided brainbuster sees one wrestler help another wrestler perform a brainbuster, usually by putting their own weight behind the move to increase its impact.

Aided leapfrog body guillotine[edit]

This move sees an opponent rest with his upper body on the ropes and his feet on one of the attacking wrestler's shoulders while the other wrestler charges at his partner, leapfrogging over him/her and straddling the opponent's lower back.

Aided neckbreaker[edit]

Any double-team move in which one wrestler helps another to perform a neckbreaker by twisting/forcing the opponent down to the mat harder while a neckbreaker is performed. Another version of an aided neckbreaker, known as an elevated neckbreaker, sees one member of the attacking tag team get the opponent up into an elevated position to allow a wrestler to perform a neckbreaker from a greater height.

Aided whiplash[edit]

This is a normal whiplash, but instead of having the opponent held in the air with the aid of the ring rope, he or she is kept in the elevated position by another wrestler. This wrestler has the opponent's legs on his or her shoulders and is facing the first wrestler. When the whiplash is performed, the extra wrestler will often twist himself or herself down to the mat and land on top of the opponent.

Aided wheelbarrow facebuster[edit]

A wheelbarrow facebuster can be combined with many facebuster and DDT variations. While one wrestler holds an opponent in a wheelbarrow clutch the second wrestler applies a front facelock and DDT's his opponent while the other wrestler drops to a sitting position impacting the opponents face to the mat, finishing the wheelbarrow facebuster.

Aided piledriver[edit]

Two wrestlers execute an aided piledriver

Any double-team move in which one wrestler help another to perform a piledriver on an opponent by pushing down on the opponent’s foot for more impact. In a variation of the move, the second wrestler jumps off the turnbuckle while pushing the opponent’s feet downward for even more damage, this is well known as a Spike Piledriver (not to be confused with a one-man spike piledriver).

Aided powerbomb[edit]

Also known as a spike powerbomb, this is any double-team (sometimes triple-team) move in which one wrestler help another to perform a powerbomb, either by aiding the wrestler to get the opponent up on to their shoulders or by pulling down on the opponent as they get dropped down, to force them into the mat harder. A triple team variation does exist, being used by The Shield, which they call a Triple Powerbomb.

Aided superbomb[edit]

In this version one partner sits on the top rope facing the ring, the second partner stands behind the opponent (both facing the first partner). The second partner then puts his head under one of the opponent's arms and lifts him into the air placing him on the first partners shoulders (the opponent's legs around his neck), from there the first partner stands up and jumps forward powerbombing the opponent from the second rope down to the ring. The Dudley Boys made this move famous by putting their adversaries through tables.

Aided splash[edit]

This move starts with both partners on either the right or left side of an opponent who is lying prone on the mat, face-up, with one partner in front of the other and both of them facing away from the opponent. The one closest to the opponent picks up the other partner, who is facing away from him/her, and makes a 180° turn before dropping the partner on the opponent. The wrestler can lift his partner in a variety of ways (military press, wheelbarrow suplex, etc.) before dropping him on the opponent. Another variation starts with both partners on either the right or left side of an opponent who is lying prone on the mat, face-up, with one partner from the opponent. The one closest to the opponent performs a military press on the other partner and before trowing them, while the other opponent performs a 360° Splash.

Aided suplex[edit]

Any double-team move in which one wrestler help another to perform a suplex, usually by putting their own weight behind the move to increase its impact.

Aided wheelbarrow suplex[edit]

This move sees one wrestler wrap a forward-facing opponent's legs around his/her waist and apply a gutwrench hold to lift the opponent up off the ground. His partner then steps in front of both wrestlers and grabs either the opponent's arms or shoulders and yanks them upward, just as the first attacker throws himself and the victim backwards in a wheelbarrow suplex. This increases the momentum with which the victim is thrown backwards on his upper back, neck, and head.

Aided headscissors takedown[edit]

This move sees one wrestler grab his/her partner's body while the partner is wrapping his legs around the opponents neck, then the partner swings and executes a headscissors takedown.

Power-Plex[edit]

This was the finishing move of the tag team known as Power and Glory (Hercules Hernandez and Paul Roma). Hercules would take an opponent and sit him on the top turnbuckle (as to set up a superplex) near his partner Roma. When Hercules set up the opponent and was ready to perform the superplex, he would tag in Roma. Roma would run to the next turnbuckle and climb up. As Hercules executed the superplex, Roma would fly off the top turnbuckle with a splash, timing the landing on the opponent so that he would hit immediately after Hercules landed.

Elevated jawbreaker[edit]

With an opponent kept up in an elevated position by one wrestler, another wrestler has chance to drop the opponent into any type of jawbreaker from a raised height. Most notably this sees the opponent's legs being held on the shoulders of one wrestler while another wrestler catches hold of the head of this opponent. At this point the wrestler will lock a hold onto the head of the opponent and drop them into the jawbreaker.

Elevated splash[edit]

This is where one wrestler (usually a larger wrestler) backs up to the corner turnbuckles and allows another wrestler to climb the turnbuckle then up onto his/her shoulders, this wrestler then jumps off to perform any type of diving splash (i.e. Shooting star press) on a supine opponent. Sometimes this move sees the first wrestler climb up on the turnbuckle himself getting even higher before the second wrestler gets up there and jumps off him.

Rocket Launcher[edit]

One wrestler ascends the top turnbuckle. Their partner then stands below them and reaches up, taking hold of them. The wrestler on the top rope then performs a flying body splash, with their partner throwing them, thus increasing their range, height, and impact. This move was named by the Midnight Express.

Assisted senton[edit]

One of the wrestlers ascends the top turnbuckle. Their partner then stands below them and reaches up, taking hold of them. The wrestler on the top rope then performs a top rope diving attack, with their partner throwing them, thus increasing their range and height.

Move Combinations[edit]

This refers to a move in which two attackers perform separate moves on an opponent at the same time.

Powerbomb combinations[edit]

Powerbomb, neckbreaker combination[edit]

This elevated neckbreaker is performed when one attacking wrestler stands facing a bent over opponent and seizes the opponent around the waist, flipping them over as in a suplex up onto another wrestler's shoulders, leaving them in a prone powerbomb position. The first wrestler keeps hold of the opponent's head at this point, holding it against their shoulder as with a hangman's neckbreaker while keeping the opponent's back and head parallel with the ground. From here the first wrestler falls to a sitting position while the other wrestler who is holding the opponent in the powerbomb position drops to their knees, thus driving the neck of the opponent into the shoulder of this wrestler from an elevated position. Beer Money, Inc. members James Storm and Bobby Roode would use this move as their tag team finisher, naming the move DWI – Drinking While Investing. When teaming up on an opponent, Batista and Randy Orton would use a variation of this move, in which the powerbomb is transitioned into a reverse RKO (neckbreaker).

Powerbomb, diving attack combination[edit]

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with an aerial attack, driving the opponent backwards and completing the partner's powerbomb with added force. Certain attacks can also be timed so that, instead of hitting the opponent at the apex of the move, they can impact at the exact moment the powerbomb impacts the opponent on the floor. Like all the below variations, this move does not have to see the second attacking wrestler dive from the turnbuckle it can be performed from any elevated surface, or alternatively the wrestler could springboard off the ring ropes to gain height.

Powerbomb, diving legdrop combination[edit]

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with a diving leg drop just as the opponent himself lands on the mat, crushing his neck, face, or chest. The leg drop can sometimes be a somersault variation.

Powerbomb, double knee backbreaker combination[edit]

The American Wolves (Eddie Edwards and Davey Richards) performing a powerbomb-double knee backbreaker combination on Adam Page.

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb while his partner is positioned in front of him. The partner then leaps upwards grabbing the opponent from behind by the chin and pulling him down into a double knee backbreaker while the first wrestler delivers the powerbomb.

Powerbomb, flying neckbreaker combination[edit]

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with a flying neckbreaker, driving the opponent backwards and finishing the powerbomb with extra force.

Powerbomb, missile dropkick combination[edit]

One wrestler sets up the opponent for a powerbomb with his back to a turnbuckle while his partner climbs that same turnbuckle. The first attacking wrestler then holds the opponent at the apex of the powerbomb while the second dives off the top rope and impacts the opponent with a missile dropkick, driving the opponent backwards and finishing the powerbomb with extra force.

Powerbomb, shiranui combination[edit]

This device variation sees one of the wrestlers lift the opponent onto his shoulders, into the powerbomb position, while standing with his back to the corner turnbuckles. Another wrestler then climbs to the top turnbuckle, faces away from the ring, and grabs a three-quarter facelock on the opponent, performing a shiranui, while the other wrestler slams the opponent down.

Powerbomb, suplex combination[edit]

This variation sees one of the wrestlers perform a suplex, but the partner behind him will catch the opponent's waist. At that point, the front wrestler will complete his suplex, and the back wrestler will complete his powerbomb.

Neckbreaker/Cutter combinations[edit]

Argentine rack, neckbreaker combination[edit]

This move first sees one wrestler place an opponent in an Argentine backbreaker rack where the opponent is held face-up across both the shoulders of the attacking wrestler. At this point, the second attacking wrestler then grabs the racked opponent's head and, along with the first wrestler, falls to the ground supposedly driving the opponent's head and neck into the mat below. Another variation is when the attacking wrestler falls backwards and the partner then does a cutter on the opponent as he falls face first into the mat.

Belly-to-back suplex, neckbreaker combination[edit]

This elevated neckbreaker is a combination of backdrop or a Back suplex side slam and a neckbreaker. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in a belly-to-back suplex lift by one partner then as the opponent falls to the mat the other partner would apply a headlock neckbreaker forcing the opponent's head into the mat.

Death Drop[edit]

Devon (left) and Bubba Ray (right) hitting the Dudley Death Drop (or 3D) on Lance Storm.

This can refer to one of 2 moves. The traditional version features a combination of a flapjack and a cutter. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in a flapjack throw by one partner then as the opponent falls to the mat the other partner applies a cutter forcing the opponent's head down to the mat. The alternative version starts with one attacker performing a delayed back drop. A second attacker will grab the defending wrestlers head, and rest it on his own shoulder. Both attackers then drop to their backs simultaneously, delivering the back drop and a neckbreaker to the defending wrestler. The move was popularized by the Dudley Boyz as 3D (shorthand for Dudley Death Drop).

Samoan drop, neckbreaker combination[edit]

One wrestler (usually the larger one) places an opponent over his or her shoulders in the fireman's carry position while the other attacking wrestler runs and jumps up alongside both men and takes hold/twists the neck of the opponent for any type of neckbreaker slam as the first wrestler falls down to the mat forcing the opponent down with them in a Samoan drop. This can see the wrestler performing the fireman's carry turn on the spot (an airplane spin) while the other charges at him or her and performs the neckbreaker as he or she spins. Another variation is when someone holds the opponent in a fireman's carry position. The partner then gives the opponent a side headlock and together at the same time, they do a double rolling somersault into a combination of the rolling fireman's carry slam and the corkscrew neckbreaker.

Gory bomb, cutter combination[edit]

One partner sets up a Gory Bomb on the opponent, while his partner stands to the back side of him. When the original partner releases the opponent, the second executes a cutter as the opponent falls.

Wheelbarrow facebuster, cutter combination[edit]

This move first sees one wrestler place an opponent in a wheelbarrow facebuster position while the other wrestler applies a three-quarter facelock. One wrestler then drops to his or her back as his or her partner drops to a sit out position performing a cutter and a wheelbarrow facebuster.

Inverted powerbomb, running cutter combination[edit]

This variation sees one of the wrestlers lift the opponent into a Canadian backbreaker rack. From this position the second wrestler runs towards the opponent and grabs his head performing a running cutter, while the other wrestler completes the inverted powerbomb, driving the opponent face-first to the mat.

Backbreaker combinations[edit]

Backbreaker hold, diving attack combination[edit]

One wrestler would hit a pendulum backbreaker and hold the opponent over his knee as another wrestler jumped down from the top rope and performed a diving attack.

Backbreaker hold, diving elbow drop combination[edit]

This variation sees the partner on the top rope hit the opponent with a diving elbow drop from the middle or top rope on the exposed head or chest, flipping the opponent over down to the mat.

Backbreaker hold, top-rope legdrop combination[edit]

This variation sees the partner on the top rope hit the opponent with a top-rope leg drop to his exposed head, flipping the opponent over down to the mat.

Bearhug combinations[edit]

Bearhug hold, attack combination[edit]

One of a number of double team moves in which one parter holds the victim in a bear hug while the other partner either runs or dives at the elevated victim and impacts him in the chest, neck, or face, driving him backwards into the ground in the process. As a variant of the bearhug/attack combination, the holding wrestler can instead use a spinebuster, driving the opponent down instead of releasing them.

Bearhug hold, flying crossbody combination[edit]

One wrestler would apply a bear hug and elevate the opponent while the other wrestler executed a flying body press from the top rope, driving the opponent to the ground from an elevated height.

Bearhug hold, high kick combination[edit]

One wrestler would apply a bear hug and elevate the opponent while the other wrestler executed a high dropkick or other high kicks as the first wrestler drops the opponent to the ground.

Bearhug hold, seated senton combination[edit]

One wrestler would apply a bear hug to the victim while his or her partner climbed the turnbuckle behind them. The second partner then dived off the turnbuckle, performering a seated senton on the victim, driving him out of his partner's arms and into the mat.[1][2]

Bearhug hold, superkick, jackknife pin combination[edit]

One wrestler would apply a bear hug while the other wrestler executed a superkick to the face of the opponent. The opponent would fall backwards, and the partner applying the bearhug would roll forward with their momentum, flipping over into a bridge position, holding both legs and ending up in a Jackknife pinning position.

Bearhug hold, top-rope legdrop combination[edit]

Commonly referred to as the Veg-O-Matic, also referred to as an Aided guillotine legdrop. In this move one wrestler would apply a bear hug and hold the opponent out as another wrestler jumped down to hit the opponent with a top-rope leg drop to his exposed head or torso, forcing the opponent hard back down to the mat.

Hart Attack[edit]

Technically known as a bearhug, lariat combination, this was the traditional finishing move of The Hart Foundation (Bret Hart and Jim Neidhart). Neidhart would lift the opponent in a bearhug in the center of the ring, while Hart leaned against the ringside ropes, facing the opponent's back. Hart would then run past the two and bounce off the ropes on the opposite side of the ring. On his return, Hart would make a running leap and perform a lariat takedown on the opponent as Neidhart let go of him, resulting in both Hart and the opponent falling onto their backs. Hart sometimes did the lariat takedown from the second corner rope. The Hart Dynasty have used a variant of this move in which Tyson Kidd would springboard from the top rope to perform the lariat takedown on a prone opponent held by David Hart Smith.

High and Low combinations[edit]

A "high and low" double team maneuver is a type of takedown that sees two wrestlers hit a combination of attacks on a standing opponent; one aimed to hit high, while the other is aimed low. The high attack usually comes from in front of the opponent, while the low attack comes from behind, sending the opponent back-first into the mat with greater force.

Lariat, running chop block combination[edit]

The attacking wrestlers stand on opposite sides of an opponent (front and back). The wrestler facing the front then executes a running lariat while the wrestler from behind executes a running chop block knocking the opponent backwards.

Superkick, spinning leg sweep combination[edit]

Both wrestlers stand facing a standing opponent. One wrestler executes a spinning leg sweep to the back of the opponent's legs, and the other executes a superkick towards the opponent simultaneously, knocking the opponent backwards.

Shoot kick, shining wizard combination[edit]

The attacking wrestlers are the on opposite sides of an opponent (front and back). The wrestler facing the back then executes a Shoot kick to the back of the opponent's knee then The wrestler facing the front then executes an Shining Wizard.

Total Elimination[edit]

This high and low move, named and popularized by The Eliminators (Perry Saturn and John Kronus), sees both wrestlers stand facing a standing opponent before Saturn executes a spinning leg sweep to the back of the opponent's legs, and Kronus executes a spinning heel-kick towards the opponent simultaneously, knocking the opponent backwards. Another version is performed by The Beautiful People (Angelina Love and Velvet Sky), Love with a roundhouse kick to the chest and Velvet with a roundhouse kick to the legs to sweep their feet, simultaneously, knocking the opponent backwards.

Dive combination[edit]

This refers to a series of specific move types. The first move is a grapple moves performed to the first attacker to the opponent. This then leaves them prone to a second, this time diving, attack from the second attacker. These usually include at least one finishing move. The most common kind sees the first attacker perform a grapple move in the ring, which leaves the defending wrestler prone to a diving attack from another attacker. Wrestlers who have a dive combination attack usually perform exactly the same moves each time. They also team to use their own half of the combination alone in singles matches. The most famous example is the version by Matt and Jeff Hardy. Matt would perform his Twist of Fate, leaving the opponent prone to Jeff's Swanton Bomb.

Suplex, flying attack combination[edit]

One wrestler would apply a stalling vertical suplex and elevate the opponent while the other wrestler executed a flying attack like a flying crossbody block or a missile dropkick from the top rope, driving the opponent to the ground from an elevated height.

Slingshot catapult, attack combination[edit]

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult on the opponent sending them towards their partner while their partner performs an attack on the prone opponent, knocking them back down with greater force.

Slingshot catapult, clothesline combination[edit]

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult on the opponent sending them towards their partner while their partner sticks their arm out and does a clothesline, knocking the opponent down. Other variations use variants of the clothesline like the more impactful lariat, or the partner goes to the top rope and performs a clothesline off the top rope

Slingshot catapult, missile dropkick combination[edit]

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult on his or her opponent, sending them flying towards the opposite turnbuckle. His or her partner then jumps off that turnbuckle and delivers a missile dropkick to the opponent in midair.

Slingshot catapult, top rope bulldog combination[edit]

The first wrestler performs a slingshot catapult in an attempt to throw the opponent away from the corner turnbuckle away from where the second wrestler is situated. As the opponent is lifted off the ground up into the apex of the throw, the second wrestler dives off the turnbuckle and performs a diving bulldog on that same opponent forcing his/her head down into the mat.

Other combinations[edit]

Doomsday Device[edit]

Main article: Doomsday Device

A move in which one wrestler hoists the opponent on his shoulders in the electric chair position, while another wrestler climbs to the top turnbuckle and delivers a flying attack on the prone opponent, often resulting in the opponent doing a back flip and landing on their front.

Flapjack DDT[edit]

One of the most common double team elevated DDT is known as a Flapjack DDT, a combination of Flapjack and a DDT. This maneuver sees an opponent get pushed upwards in air during a flapjack attempted then just as the opponent falls to the mat the wrestlers partner will put opponent in a front facelock and as all three fall down to the mat the DDT will ensure the opponent is forced to dive forward onto his own head.

Leg drop, splash combination[edit]

This type of combination sees two wrestlers simultaneously execute any type of splash and leg drop on one prone opponent lying on the mat. However, the double team move is not limited to grounded variations of splashes and leg drops many wrestlers utilize aerial versions, or versions where one of the two attacks come from an elevated position.

The most common all elevated version of this, known as the Event Omega sees the opponent lying prone on the mat while both wrestlers climb on opposite turnbuckles or occasionally ladders, and come down simultaneously with a diving leg drop and a diving splash.

Poetry in Motion[edit]

Hardy Boyz performing Poetry in Motion on Billy Gunn.

This move sees one wrestler either place his opponent or Irish whip his opponent into the turnbuckle. The same wrestler then gets down on all fours and their partner runs from the opposite side of the ring/opposite turnbuckle, leaps off his partner's back, and performs an aided splash/calf kick/heel kick/leg lariat/dropkick or in some rare instances, a leg drop on the opponent. A one man version involves leaping off one or more chairs instead of a partner. If the move is done with a chair in hand, it is usually a dropkick version, with the attacker driving the chair into his opponent. The Hardy Boyz innovated said maneuver and used it as a double-team signature move, usually utilizing the leg lariat as the attack. Jeff Hardy also uses the one man version.

Tandem moves[edit]

This is when both attacking wrestlers perform exactly the same move to the exact opponent at the same time, thus increasing the damage inflicted by the move.

Con-chair-to[edit]

This move consists of a double steel folding chair shot to the head of an opponent, one from either side hitting the back of the head and the face of an opponent simultaneously. There is also a one-man variation of the move known as a one-man con-chair-to where the opponent's head is lying on a chair on the mat and the attacker slams another chair on their head. The name of the move is derived from the musical term "concerto". It was invented by the tag team of Edge and Christian.

Double bulldog[edit]

A double bulldog is when two wrestlers both hit a bulldog on a single opponent. It can also refer to two bulldogs being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time.

Double butt splash[edit]

A double butt splash is when two wrestlers both run into on a single opponent. Usually done on to an opponent hanging on the ropes or an opponent in a corner.

Double cutter[edit]

A double cutter is a common term which refers to double team variations of the three-quarter facelock bulldog maneuver (known as a "cutter"). This move sees the attacking wrestlers first stand either side of an opponent and apply a three-quarter facelock (reaching behind the head of an opponent, thus pulling the opponent's jaw above each of the wrestler's shoulders) before both (moving forwards and) falling backwards to force the opponent face first to the mat below. However, due to the face lock the opponent's face often never reaches the mat, instead lands on the shoulders of the attacking wrestlers.

Double chokeslam[edit]

When two wrestlers execute a chokeslam on a single opponent at the same time it is referred to as a double chokeslam. Due to convenience of wording, a double chokeslam can also refer to two chokeslams being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time (i.e.; single person double chokeslam), and occasionally in a tag team match where each member of one team will chokeslam a member of the opposing team (i.e.; two person simultaneous chokeslams) which can also be referred to as stereo chokeslams. The traditional version is also referred to as a double spinebuster / double front slam as the action of lifting an opponent up and throwing them down are much the same, though the spinebuster, and front slam are more common on a charging opponent.

Double clothesline[edit]

Two wrestlers both hitting a clothesline on a single opponent by joining hands at the same time.

Double crucifix powerbomb[edit]

This two man version of a crucifix powerbomb sees a single opponent lifted between two wrestlers so that the opponent is being lifted by their spread out arms. At the apex of the move where the opponent is raised to the highest point it will look as though he/she had been crucified at this point the attacking wrestlers then kneel, and bends forwards, to throw the opponent forward to the mat on to their back or neck and shoulders. It was popularized on the independent scene as the "T-Gimmick" by The Backseat Boyz. Another inverted triple-team variation known as "Ragnarok" was used by the Bruderschaft des Kreuzes in Chikara where Castagnoli and Tursas lift the opponent up by their arms, while Ares runs through and pushes their legs back so that they flip over into a double team iconoclasm by Castagnoli and Tursas.

Double DDT[edit]

When two wrestlers both hit a DDT on a single opponent by standing either side of the opponent and applying the front facelock before hitting the move. This move can see more than one opponent be headlocked, using the wrestlers free arms, to become a seemingly indefinite line of wrestlers and opponents all linked together. A double DDT can also refer to two DDTs being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time. Another reference, also known as stereo DDTs, sees two wrestlers performing a DDT on two different people at the same time.

Double inverted DDT[edit]

This is similar to a normal double DDT only that they are in an inverted headlock and drop them in the back of the head.

Double lifting DDT[edit]

This is similar to a normal double DDT except for the fact that both wrestlers jump and lift the opponent.

Double dropkick[edit]

When two wrestlers simultaneously hit a dropkick on a single opponent. Attacking wrestlers may both target the front or back of the opponent, or sometimes "sandwich" the opponent by dropkicking them from either side.

Double missile dropkick[edit]

Similar to the double dropkick, both wrestlers execute missile dropkicks from adjacent turnbuckles onto a single opponent.

Double drop toe-hold[edit]

In a double drop toe-hold two wrestlers hit a drop toe-hold on each leg of a single opponent.

Double elbow drop[edit]

This is a double team maneuver which involves two wrestlers hitting a variations of an elbow drop (standing, or flying) on one person at the same time. Often this move sees two wrestlers knock down a charging opponent leaving the opponent in a position in which both wrestlers can stand either side of the fallen opponent and before elbow drops. These elbow drops are often preceded by some sort of dance/taunt or the joining of hands, or otherwise, with the specific wrestler's theatrics.

Double enzuigiri[edit]

This is a double team maneuver in which both attacking wrestlers will perform an Enzuigiri on a single opponent, each from different sides.

Double extreme leg drop[edit]

This move, innovated, named and popularized by the Hardy Boyz, sees one wrestler (Matt) climb to the top turnbuckle while his partner (Jeff) holds up their opponent's legs (The opponent in question is obviously perpendicular to the wrestler on the top rope). Then, the wrestler on the top rope performs a leg drop on the opponent's neck while his partner performs an extreme leg drop (double leg drop to the groin/lower-abdominal area) at the same time.

Double facebuster[edit]

This move sees two wrestlers performing two facebusters at the same time on a single opponent.

Double fireman's carry[edit]

Two wrestlers both lift a single opponent up into a fireman's carry leaving the two wrestlers back-to-back with the opponent across their shoulders is called a double fireman's carry. From here the two wrestlers can perform a double version of a fireman's carry slam, the wrestlers can also both fall backwards down to the mat dropping the opponent face-first into the canvas in a double flapjack type move.

Double flapjack[edit]

Two wrestlers throw a single opponent up into a flapjack. In this move both wrestlers would push the opponent upward by reaching under their legs and lifting them into the air, while remaining the hold on the opponent’s legs the wrestlers would fall backwards, dropping the opponent front-first into the canvas. Another basic double flapjack is similar to a back drop, in which the wrestlers push the opponent upwards and release him/her so that they fall onto their face instead of falling back-first.

Double hip toss[edit]

When two wrestlers both hit a hip toss on a single opponent by both wrestlers underhooking the closest arm and then quickly lifting the opponent up and throwing him/her forward, flipping the opponent onto his/her back.

Catching hip toss[edit]

As two wrestlers hit the hip toss on a single opponent, both wrestlers catch the legs of the opponent as he/she flips over so that both have a hold of one arm and leg of their opponent.From this position the wrestlers can lift the opponent up into the air and drop them onto the mat, or lift the opponent up and drop to a kneeling position so that the opponent would drop onto their knees. This double team move is more common with lighter wrestlers or wrestlers with an old school style.

Double STO[edit]

This move can either be a double STO when two wrestlers both hit a STO on a single opponent at the same time, or an aided STO (known in Japan as Oregatokare or "rage dragon slayer") where one wrestler help another wrestler to perform the STO, usually by sweeping out the legs from under the opponent. A reverse variation also exists.

Double submission[edit]

This term applies to any instance when attacking wrestlers lock an opponent in simultaneous submission holds.

Double superkick[edit]

A tandem attack where two wrestlers stand in front of an opponent and hit him/her in the face/head with a high, side thrust kick, known as a superkick. The name can also refer to what is known as stereo superkicks when two wrestlers both perform superkicks to two different opponents at the same time.

Double suplex[edit]

The Kings of Wrestling (Chris Hero and Claudio Castagnoli) performing a double suplex on Shelton Benjamin.

A throw in which two wrestlers will both suplex one opponent at the same time is called double suplex. The most common suplexs used for this double team move are the snap and vertical variations, in which the wrestlers apply a front face lock to the opponent, draping the opponent’s near arm over their respective shoulders, at this point the wrestlers will either pull their own legs back and kick them forward quickly slamming them to the ground to build momentum to fall backwards and flip the opponent over them so they all land on their backs for a double snap suplex. In a double vertical suplex the move is the same except that when the opponent is in position he/she is lifted and held upside-down before the wrestlers fall backwards. A double suplex can also refer to two suplexes being performed by one wrestler on two opponents at the same time, although this move is much rarer and typically requires a larger wrestler to suplex two smaller wrestlers often as a counter to a standard double suplex.

Double belly-to-back suplex[edit]

The attackers stand behind the opponent on either side of him and put their heads under his arms. They then lift the opponent up using their arms wrapped around his torso, falling backwards and dropping the opponent flat on the mat in elevating the opponent so that he/she is lifted and held upside-down before the attackers fall to their backs driving the opponent down to the mat front-first, behind the attackers, as in a belly-to-back suplex. A slingshot variation is also possible.

Wishbone[edit]

This move, which is named after the tradition of pulling on a wishbone, sees two wrestlers each take hold of an opponent's leg (who is lying face up on the mat) and yank them in opposite directions stretching out the groin area.

Diving headbutt low blow[edit]

While one wrestler slams an opponent and spreads their legs apart the other wrestler would climb the turnbuckle and perform a diving headbutt into the opponent's groin. The Dudley Boyz use this tag team move, calling it the Whassup Headbutt.

Diving leg drop low blow[edit]

While one wrestler slams an opponent and spreads their legs apart the other wrestler would climb the turnbuckle and perform a diving extreme leg drop into the opponent's groin.

Russian legsweep, clothesline combination[edit]

One wrestler would begin a Russian legsweep as another wrestler hit the opponent with a clothesline, forcing the opponent hard back down to the mat.

Sidewalk slam, top-rope legdrop combination[edit]

One wrestler would perform a sidewalk slam, and then their partner would perform a top-rope legdrop on the prone, supine opponent. A slight variation of this sees the wrestler stay grounded instead of ascending to the top turnbuckle, performing a jumping legdrop on the opponent rather than a top rope one.

Sky lift slam[edit]

This move sees the two attacking wrestlers standing either side of an opponent and hook their arms under the legs and arms of their side to elevate the opponent. From this position, the wrestlers then force the opponent upwards, throwing them up while releasing the hold to allow the opponent to fall and slam into the mat back-first. The stable The Spirit Squad has been known to use this move, only with 5 wrestlers lifting up the one, instead of the usual two attackers.

Spanish fly[edit]

This variation of the moonsault side slam is performed while all three wrestlers are on the top turnbuckle. The wrestlers stand either side, slightly behind, and facing the front of a standing opponent, the wrestlers then reach under the near arms of the opponent, across the chest and under the opponent far arm, while placing their other hands on the back of the opponent to hold them in place. The wrestlers then perform a moonsault while holding the opponent, driving the opponent into the ground back-first in a side slam position.

Stack-superplex[edit]

A variation of the superplex (a vertical suplex off the top turnbuckle) in which the wrestler delivering the suplex sits upon the shoulders of another wrestler rather than standing on the ring ropes/turnbuckles where the opponent is situated. At the apex of the suplex, the lower wrestler allows himself to fall backwards, increasing the power and momentum of the other wrestler's maneuver. A multi person variation first sees an attacking wrestler climb the turnbuckles as if to perform a superplex on an opponent situated on the top turnbuckle, or in some case two wrestlers attempt a double superplex on the single opponent. However, at this point one or more wrestlers stand under the elevated wrestlers and hold them as if to perform a powerbomb; slamming them to the mat as they pull the other wrestler off the top.

STO, big boot combination[edit]

This move requires one person standing in front of the opponent, while the other runs towards the held opponent. The running wrestler will deliver a boot to the face, and the wrestler in front will then deliver an STO aided by the momentum of the kick.

STO, Russian legsweep combination[edit]

This move requires one person standing behind the opponent, while one stands in front. The wrestler in front will deliver an STO, and the wrestler behind the opponent will perform a Russian legsweep on the same opponent. The reverse and forward versions of the moves can be used as well.

Superkick-Plex[edit]

This combination move sees one wrestler hit a superkick to the chin of an opponent who is being held in a belly-to-back position by the second wrestler. The second wrestler uses the thrust of the superkick to aid in executing a bridging German suplex or any similar suplex for a pinfall attempt. This move is not to be confused with a superplex, which is a suplex from the top turnbuckle.

Wheelbarrow hold, top rope legdrop combination[edit]

This move sees one wrestler wrap a forward-facing opponent's legs around his/her waist and apply a gutwrench hold to lift the opponent up off the ground. At this point another wrestler, who is situated on the top turnbuckle would then jump down to hit the opponent with a top-rope leg drop to the back of his exposed head, forcefully driving the opponent's face and body back down to the mat.

Other unique double team moves[edit]

Battering ram[edit]

One wrestler stands behind his partner and leans forward, placing his head underneath his partner's arm, in a headlock. The two then charge forward, ramming the head of the rear wrestler into the opponent. There is also a one man version of the move.

Dropkick overdrive[edit]

One wrestler sets up an inverted overdrive is another version of a swinging neckbreaker, in which the attacking wrestler would use a leg (in this case a knee) rather than hands to perform the twist. In this move a wrestler would first place one knee (the one closest to an opponent) against the base of the opponent's neck, who is leaning forward, while underhooking one of the opponent's arms (the furthest one). The second one dropkicks the opponent in the side of the head before the first wrestler falls backwards down to the mat as the opponent is spun over, landing on the back of the head on the attacking wrestler's knee.

Scoop powerslam, Powerbomb combination[edit]

One wrestler performs a scoop powerslam on an opponent, then the partner puts the other partner into a powerbomb then the partner slams his or her partner on the opponent.

Hiptoss, Aided hiptoss combination[edit]

One wrestler performs a hiptoss on an opponent, then the wrestler's partner runs to the wrestler, where she/he performs a hiptoss on the partner on top of the opponent.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WWE Vintage Collection Report (01/16/11)". Rajah. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "OLD SCHOOL WRESTLERS OF THE WEEK". 411mania. Retrieved 5 November 2011.