Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta leadership election, 2011

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Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta leadership election, 2011
AB PC Leadership 2011.svg
Date September 17, 2011 (2011-09-17) (1st ballot)
October 1, 2011 (2011-10-01) (2nd & 3rd ballot)
Convention Calgary Metropolitan Centre (1st ballot)
Edmonton Expo Centre (2nd & 3rd ballot)
Resigning leader Ed Stelmach
Won by Alison Redford
Ballots 3
Candidates 6
Entrance Fee $40,000 ($15,000 refundable)
Spending limit none

The Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta leadership election, 2011 was prompted by Ed Stelmach's announcement that he would not be seeking re-election in the 28th general election and therefore would be resigning as leader of the Progressive Conservatives. With the Progressive Conservatives forming the Alberta government, the winner of the election consequently became Premier of Alberta.

Stelmach provided official notice of resignation on May 27, 2011. The PC Association then announced the timeline of the election, with the nomination deadline on July 15, and the first ballot on September 17. As no candidate had over 50% of the vote, the second ballot, with the top three candidates, took place on October 1, 2011. Upon no candidate receiving over 50% on that ballot, the second preference votes were added, and Alison Redford was declared the leader, after Gary Mar received the most votes on the first and second ballots.

Declared candidates[edit]

Doug Griffiths

MLA for Battle River-Wainwright since 2002.[1]

Support from caucus members: 2 Doug Griffiths, Kyle Fawcett[2]
Support from outside caucus:
Date campaign launched: February 16, 2011
Doug Horner

MLA for Spruce Grove-Sturgeon-St. Albert since 2001. Served in the cabinet from 2004 to 2011.[3]

Support from caucus members: 14 Doug Horner, Ray Danyluk, Hector Goudreau, Jack Hayden, Frank Oberle, Jr., Luke Ouellette, Lindsay Blackett, Jeff Johnson, Wayne Drysdale, Dave Quest, Diana McQueen, Ken Kowalski, Len Mitzel, Pearl Calahasen[4]
Additional supporters from caucus after first ballot: Carl Benito, Don Getty
Date campaign launched: February 4, 2011
Gary Mar

MLA from 1993 to 2007. Served in the cabinet from 1993 to 2006. Alberta representative in Washington, D.C. from 2007 to 2011.[5]

Support from caucus members: 27 Iris Evans,[6] Cindy Ady, Lloyd Snelgrove, Thomas Lukaszuk, Ron Liepert, Heather Klimchuk, Rob Renner, Mary Anne Jablonski, Verlyn Olson, George Rogers, Yvonne Fritz, Moe Amery, Len Webber, Teresa Woo-Paw, Neil Brown, Broyce Jacobs, Naresh Bhardwaj, Fred Horne, Dave Hancock, Mel Knight, Ray Prins, Barry McFarland, Richard Marz, Ty Lund, Arno Doerksen, George VanderBurg, Alana DeLong[7]
Additional supporters from caucus after first ballot: Ted Morton,[8] Doug Griffiths,[9] Jonathan Denis,[10] Ken Allred, Evan Berger, Manmeet Bhullar, George Groeneveld[11]
Support from outside caucus: Gary Mar, Lorne Taylor,[12] Ralph Klein,[13] Danny Williams,[14] Steve West,[15] Rick Orman[8]
Date campaign launched: March 16, 2011
Ted Morton

MLA for Foothills-Rocky View since 2004. Served in the cabinet from 2006 to 2011. Third place finisher in the 2006 leadership race.[16]

Support from caucus members: 11 Ted Morton, Ken Allred, David Xiao, Doug Elniski, Carl Benito, Tony Vandermeer, Peter Sandhu, Jonathan Denis, Dave Rodney, Evan Berger, George Groeneveld.
Support from outside caucus:
Date campaign launched: January 25, 2011
Rick Orman

MLA for Calgary Montrose from 1986 to 1993. Minister of Career Development and Employment from 1986 to 1988. Minister of Labour from 1988 to 1989. Minister of Energy from 1989 to 1992.[17]

Support from caucus members:
Support from outside caucus: Rick Orman
Date campaign launched: May 11, 2011
Redford campaigning in Calgary in May
Alison Redford

MLA for Calgary-Elbow since 2008 and minister of justice from 2008 to 2011.[18]

Support from caucus members: 2 Alison Redford, Art Johnston[19]
Additional support from caucus after first ballot: Doug Elniski,[20] Dave Rodney, David Xiao, Kyle Fawcett[21]
Support from outside caucus:
Date campaign launched: February 16, 2011

Results[edit]

First ballot[edit]

The leading candidate in each riding on the first ballot.

The first ballot was on September 17, 2011.[22]

Candidate Votes Percentage
Gary Mar 24,195 40.76
Alison Redford 11,127 18.74
Doug Horner 8,635 14.55
Ted Morton 6,962 11.73
Rick Orman 6,005 10.12
Doug Griffiths 2,435 4.10
Total 59,359 100.00

Two days following the first ballot, Morton and Orman decided to endorse Mar.[8] Griffiths followed the next day.

Second ballot[edit]

The leading candidate in each riding on the second ballot.

A preferential ballot was cast on October 1, 2011. Because no candidate received more than 50% of the vote on the first count, the third place finisher was dropped, and the second preference votes cast on Horner's ballots were counted and added to the remaining candidate's totals. Mar led after the first round, and Horner was eliminated. After second preferences were applied, Redford was declared the winner.

Candidate Round 1[23] Round 2[24]
Votes Percentage Votes Percentage
Alison Redford 28,993 37.09 37,101 51.11
Gary Mar 33,233 42.51 35,491 48.89
Doug Horner 15,950 20.40 Eliminated
Total 78,176 100.00 72,592 100.00

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MLA Doug Griffiths joins leadership race". Global Calgary. February 16, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ Fawcett, Kyle (March 23, 2011). "Why Doug?". PC Alberta. Retrieved May 8, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Doug Horner joins Tory leadership race". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. February 4, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011. 
  4. ^ "MLA Support for Doug Horner". HornerforAlberta.ca. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Mar vows to 'never quit' in battle for leadership". Calgary Herald. March 17, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Iris Evans backs Mar". Calgary Sun. March 17, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Gary’s MLA Support". GaryMar.ca. August 29, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b c http://garymar.ca/2011/09/morton-and-orman-join-gary-mar-to-unite-the-alberta-pcs/
  9. ^ "Griffiths supports Mar in Tory race". CBC News. September 20, 2011. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Mar campaign gains more steam". CTV Calgary. September 21, 2011. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  11. ^ Cuthbertson, Richard (September 22, 2011). "Mar calls for discussion on merits of private health". Calgary Herald. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Former area MLA supporting Mar". Medicine Hat News. August 24, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Don Getty backs Doug Horner, as Ralph Klein endorses Gary Mar in Tory leadership race". Calgary Herald. August 17, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Williams to campaign for Mar in Alberta". The Telegram. September 4, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2011. 
  15. ^ http://garymar.ca/2011/07/dr-steve-west-%E2%80%93-gary-mar-is-my-choice-to-lead-alberta-into-the-21st-century/
  16. ^ "Ted Morton first off the blocks in leadership race". National Post (Canada). January 25, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Orman Talks Tough". Calgary Sun. May 11, 2011. Retrieved May 12, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Archive: Alison Redford throws hat in ring". Calgary Herald. February 16, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011. 
  19. ^ Markusoff, Jason (September 19, 2011). "The meaning and meaninglessness of MLA endorsements". Calgary Herald. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  20. ^ https://twitter.com/#!/LedgeWatcher/status/115869525311881216
  21. ^ Baird, Don (September 22, 2011). "Mar calls for discussion on merits of private health". Calgary Herald. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  22. ^ "Detailed Poll Results". PC Alberta. September 19, 2011. Retrieved September 18, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Leadership Results Second ballot". PC Alberta. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 
  24. ^ "Leadership Results Third ballot". PC Alberta. Retrieved October 2, 2011. 

External links[edit]