Proinflammatory cytokine

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A proinflammatory cytokine is a cytokine which promotes systemic inflammation.

Examples include IL-1[1] and TNF alpha.[2]

Function[edit]

Due to their proinflammatory action, they tend to make a disease worse by producing fever, inflammation, tissue destruction, and, in some cases, even shock and death.[1]

Clinical implications[edit]

Reducing the biological activities of proinflammatory cytokines can reduce the brunt of attack of diseases mediated by proinflammatory cytokines.[1] Blocking IL-1 or TNF has been highly successful in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease,[3] or graft-vs-host disease.[1] However, the strategy has not been successful in humans with sepsis.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Dinarello CA (August 2000). "Proinflammatory cytokines". Chest 118 (2): 503–8. doi:10.1378/chest.118.2.503. PMID 10936147. 
  2. ^ Cheung CY, Poon LL, Lau AS, et al. (December 2002). "Induction of proinflammatory cytokines in human macrophages by influenza A (H5N1) viruses: a mechanism for the unusual severity of human disease?". Lancet 360 (9348): 1831–7. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11772-7. PMID 12480361. 
  3. ^ Strober W, Fuss IJ (May 2011). "Proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases". Gastroenterology 140 (6): 1756–67. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2011.02.016. PMID 21530742.