Propertarianism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Propertarian)
Jump to: navigation, search

Propertarianism is an ethical discipline within libertarian philosophy that advocates contractual relationships as replacements for monopolistic bureaucracies organized as states.

History[edit]

It appears that the term was coined (in its most recent sense, at least) by Edward Cain, in 1963:

... Since [Libertarians'] use of the word "liberty" refers almost exclusively to property, it would be helpful if we had some other word, such as "propertarian," to describe them. [....] Ayn Rand .... is the closest to what I mean by a propertarian.[1]

Hans Morgenthau used propertarianism to characterize the connection between property and suffrage.[2]

Historian Marcus Cunliffe defined propertarianism in his 1973 lectures as "characteristic values of American history" in regard to property.[3][4][5][6]

Markus Verhaegh states Rothbardian libertarian anarchism or anarcho-capitalism advocate that property only may originate by being the product of labor, and may then only legitimately change hands by trade or gift. They term this as "neo-Lockean".(2006)[7]

David Boaz writes that the "propertarian approach to privacy," both morally and legally, has ensured Americans' privacy rights. (2002)[8]

L. Neil Smith describes propertarianism as a positive libertarian philosophy in his novels The Probability Broach (1980) and The American Zone (2002).[9][10]

Brian Doherty describes Murray Rothbard's form of libertarianism as "propertarian" because he "reduced all human rights to rights of property, beginning with the natural right of self-ownership."[11]

Non or anti-propertarianism[edit]

Ursula K. Le Guin, in the science fiction novel The Dispossessed (1974), contrasted a propertarian society with one that does not recognize property rights.[12][13] She used the term in a negative sense because she believed property objectified human beings. She has been described as an anarcho-communist.[14][15]

Non-propertarians like Murray Bookchin also have been called anti-propertarians. Bookchin described three concepts of possession: property itself, possession, and usufruct, appropriation of resources by virtue of use.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Edward Cain (1963). They'd Rather Be Right: youth and the conservative movement. Macmillan. pp. 32–36. ASIN B0000CLYF9. 
  2. ^ Hans Morgenthua, p. 174.
  3. ^ Hans Joachim Morgenthau, (Kenneth W. Thompson, Robert John Myers, Editors), Truth and tragedy: a tribute to Hans J. Morgenthau, Transaction Publishers, p. 165, 1984 ISBN 0-87855-866-7.
  4. ^ Marcus Cunliffe, The right to property: a theme in American history, Sir George Watson lecture delivered in the University of Leicester, 4 May 1973 Leicester University Press, 1974 ISBN 0-7185-1129-8, ISBN 978-0-7185-1129-6
  5. ^ Rob Kroes, Them and us: questions of citizenship in a globalizing world, University of Illinois Press, p. 208, 2000 ISBN 0-252-06909-9
  6. ^ Marcus Cunliffe, In search of America: transatlantic essays, 1951-1990, p. 307, 1991.
  7. ^ Verhaegh, Marcus (2006). "Rothbard as a Political Philosopher". Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (4): 3. 
  8. ^ David Boaz, Cato Institute, Toward liberty: the idea that is changing the world : 25 years of public policy from the Cato Institute, Cato Institute, p. 386, 2002 ISBN 1-930865-27-9
  9. ^ L. Neil Smith, The American Zone, p. 167, 2002.
  10. ^ John J. Pierce, When world views collide: a study in imagination and evolution, p. 163, 1989.
  11. ^ Doherty, Brian (2008). "Rothbard, Murray (1926–1995)". In Hamowy, Ronald. The Encyclopedia of Libertarianism. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE; Cato Institute. p. 442. ISBN 978-1-4129-6580-4. LCCN 2008009151. OCLC 750831024. 
  12. ^ Ursela K. Le Guin, The dispossessed: a novel, HarperCollins, various pages, 2003 ISBN 0-06-051275-X
  13. ^ John P. Reeder, Source, sanction, and salvation: religion and morality in Judaic and Christian traditions, p. 113, 1988. Reeder uses phrase "nonpropertarian" to describe Le Guin's views.
  14. ^ Laurence Davis, Peter G. Stillman, The new utopian politics of Ursula K. Le Guin's The dispossessed, Lexington Books, p. xvii, 2005.
  15. ^ On Triton and Other Matters: An Interview with Samuel R. Delany, Science Fiction Studies, November 1990.
  16. ^ Ellie Clement and Charles Oppenheim, Department of Information Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leics Great Britain, Anarchism, Alternative Publishers and Copyright, Journal of Anarchist Studies, undated.