Prospect Park, New Jersey

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Prospect Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Prospect Park
Map of Prospect Park in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Prospect Park in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Prospect Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Prospect Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°56′29″N 74°10′28″W / 40.94152°N 74.174435°W / 40.94152; -74.174435Coordinates: 40°56′29″N 74°10′28″W / 40.94152°N 74.174435°W / 40.94152; -74.174435[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated March 13, 1901
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Mohamed Khairullah (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Yancy Wazirmas[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.478 sq mi (1.238 km2)
 • Land 0.475 sq mi (1.230 km2)
 • Water 0.003 sq mi (0.008 km2)  0.61%
Area rank 548th of 566 in state
16th of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 236 ft (72 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 5,865
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 5,888
 • Rank 352nd of 566 in state
16th of 16 in county[11]
 • Density 12,347.2/sq mi (4,767.3/km2)
 • Density rank 19th of 566 in state
3rd of 16 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07508, 07538[12][13]
Area code(s) 973[14]
FIPS code 3403161170[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885362[17][2]
Website www.prospectpark.net

Prospect Park is a borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,865,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 86 (+1.5%) from the 5,779 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 726 (+14.4%) from the 5,053 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

The borough of Prospect Park was formed by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 13, 1901, from portions of the now-defunct Manchester Township.[19] It is a dry town, where alcohol cannot be sold, as affirmed by an ordinance passed in 1978.[20][21]

Geography[edit]

Prospect Park is located at 40°56′29″N 74°10′28″W / 40.94152°N 74.174435°W / 40.94152; -74.174435 (40.94152,-74.174435). According to the United States Census Bureau, Prospect Park borough had a total area of 0.478 square miles (1.238 km2), of which, 0.475 square miles (1.230 km2) of it was land and 0.003 square miles (0.008 km2) of it (0.61%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 2,719
1920 4,292 57.9%
1930 5,909 37.7%
1940 5,714 −3.3%
1950 5,242 −8.3%
1960 5,201 −0.8%
1970 5,176 −0.5%
1980 5,142 −0.7%
1990 5,053 −1.7%
2000 5,779 14.4%
2010 5,865 1.5%
Est. 2012 5,888 [10] 0.4%
Population sources: 1910-1920[22]
1910[23] 1910-1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,865 people, 1,797 households, and 1,456 families residing in the borough. The population density was 12,347.2 per square mile (4,767.3 /km2). There were 1,931 housing units at an average density of 4,065.2 per square mile (1,569.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 51.07% (2,995) White, 19.86% (1,165) Black or African American, 1.50% (88) Native American, 3.21% (188) Asian, 0.10% (6) Pacific Islander, 18.21% (1,068) from other races, and 6.05% (355) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 52.09% (3,055) of the population.[7]

There were 1,797 households, of which 43.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.6% were married couples living together, 26.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.0% were non-families. 14.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.26 and the average family size was 3.59.[7]

In the borough, 28.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31.7 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $63,194 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,308) and the median family income was $65,625 (+/- $6,456). Males had a median income of $43,109 (+/- $6,443) versus $30,142 (+/- $9,427) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,993 (+/- $2,145). About 12.0% of families and 11.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.4% of those under age 18 and 20.0% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Same-sex couples headed 8 households in 2010, a decline from the 11 counted in 2000.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 5,779 people, 1,822 households, and 1,432 families residing in the borough. The population density was 12,043.7 people per square mile (4,648.5/km2). There were 1,889 housing units at an average density of 3,936.8 per square mile (1,519.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 61.17% White, 13.65% African American, 0.42% Native American, 3.15% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 13.70% from other races, and 7.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 38.26% of the population.[26][27]

There were 1,822 households out of which 44.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 20.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.4% were non-families. 17.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.56.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 29.6% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 32.8% from 25 to 44, 18.5% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 90.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.7 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $46,434, and the median income for a family was $49,405. Males had a median income of $31,951 versus $26,569 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $16,410. About 7.9% of families and 10.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

As part of the 2000 Census, 1.7% of Prospect Park's residents identified themselves as being of Albanian ancestry. This was the 11th-highest percentage of Albanian American people in any place in the United States with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.[30] In the same census, 3.2% of Prospect Park's residents identified themselves as being of Arab American ancestry. This was the sixth-highest percentage of Arab American people in any place in the United States with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.[31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Prospect Park is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] Prospect Park's elections are partisan, which under New Jersey law (which has since been amended) requires them to be held in November.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Prospect Park is Mohamed Khairullah, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2014.[32] Members of the Borough Council are Felicia Ortiz (D, 2014), Robert Artis (D, 2014), Richard Esquiche (D, 2015), Samir Hayek (D, 2015), Council President Cristina Peralta (D, 2016) and Adnan Zakaria (D, 2016).[33][34][35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Prospect Park is located in the 9th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 35th state legislative district.[8][38][39] Prior to the 2010 Census, Prospect Park had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[40]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[44][45]

The 35th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nellie Pou (D, North Haledon) and in the General Assembly by Shavonda E. Sumter (D, Paterson) and Benjie E. Wimberly (D, Paterson).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected to staggered three-year terms office on an at-large basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[49] As of 2013, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce James (D, term ends December 31, 2014; Clifton),[50] Freeholder Deputy Director Theodore O. Best Jr. (D, 2014; Paterson),[51] John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2013; West Milford),[52] Pat Lepore (D, 2013; Woodland Park)[53] and Hector C. Lora (D, 2015; Passaic).[54][55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (2014),[56] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik[57] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo.[58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,139 registered voters in Prospect Park, of which 1,710 (54.5% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 345 (11.0% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,084 (34.5% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[59] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 53.5% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 74.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[59][60]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,721 votes here (75.9% vs. 58.8% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 474 votes (20.9% vs. 37.7%) and other candidates with 15 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 2,267 ballots cast by the borough's 3,387 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.9% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County).[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 1,325 votes here (64.8% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 655 votes (32.0% vs. 42.7%) and other candidates with 22 votes (1.1% vs. 0.7%), among the 2,046 ballots cast by the borough's 3,270 registered voters, for a turnout of 62.6% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).[62]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 743 ballots cast (66.1% vs. 50.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 310 votes (27.6% vs. 43.2%), Independent Chris Daggett with 33 votes (2.9% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 9 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 1,124 ballots cast by the borough's 3,116 registered voters, yielding a 36.1% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).[63]

Education[edit]

The Prospect Park School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. Prospect Park Elementary School had an enrollment of 858 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[64] The school population was made up of Hispanic (54%), White (22%), Black (22%), and Other (2%).[65]

For grades 9 - 12, public school students attend Manchester Regional High School, which serves students from Haledon, North Haledon, and Prospect Park.[66][67] The school is located in Haledon. Students from North Haledon attend the high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the North Haledon School District.[68] The Manchester district participates in the Interdistrict Public School Choice Program, which allows non-resident students to attend the district's schools without cost to their parents, with tuition paid by the state. Available lots are announced annually by grade.[69]

Students are also eligible to attend the Passaic County Technical Institute, a countywide program located in Wayne.[70]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Municipal Clerk, Borough of Prospect Park. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 151.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Prospect Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Prospect Park borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 14. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Prospect Park borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Prospect Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Prospect Park, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 211. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  20. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  21. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Prospect Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Prospect Park borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Prospect Park borough, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  29. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  30. ^ Albanian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed June 28, 2006.
  31. ^ Arab Communities, EPodunk. Accessed June 28, 2006.
  32. ^ Mayor, Borough of Prospect Park. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  33. ^ 2012 Passaic County Directory, Passaic County, New Jersey, p. 42. Accessed January 14, 2012.
  34. ^ Nobile, Tom. "Democrats take council seats in Prospect Park", The Gazette (Hawthorne), November 7, 2012. Accessed January 14, 2013. "Democrats Samir Hayek and Richard Esquiche easily won the two, three-years seats on the council by beating Republicans Karl Hoffman and Nabil Rehim in the Prospect Park Council election on Nov. 6. Hayek is an incumbent."
  35. ^ Official Results - 2010 General Election, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  36. ^ Official Results - 2011 General Election, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2013.
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 63, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ Clerk-Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Bruce James, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Theodore O. Best Jr., Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Terry Duffy, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Pat Lepore, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Patberg, Zach. "Democrats take full control of Passaic County freeholder board", The Record (Bergen County), January 4, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Ronda Casson Cotroneo, a family law attorney, wants [to] establish a program that links lawyers and counselors with victims of domestic violence. John Bartlett, also a lawyer, imagines more parks, calling them the county’s 'undiscovered gem.'... Lora, a Passaic city councilman, says better communication with constituents is the key to good government, whether through handshakes or social media."
  56. ^ County Clerk, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Richard H. Berdnik, Passaic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ County Surrogate, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Passaic, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  60. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  61. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  62. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  63. ^ 2009 Governor: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  64. ^ Data for the Prospect Park Elementary School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 14, 2013.
  65. ^ Welcome to Our School, Prospect Park School District. Accessed June 5, 2008.
  66. ^ Passaic County Manchester Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed august 7, 2013. "The school serves the communities of Haledon, North Haledon, and Prospect Park as well as a select number of Choice students from Bergen, Passaic and Essex Counties."
  67. ^ Zaremba, Justin. "Judge recommends revisions to Manchester Regional High School funding formula", The Gazette (Hawthorne), March 29, 2011. Accessed January 13, 2013. "For the past two decades, North Haledon has sought to redress the taxation rate for the Manchester Regional School District, contending that residents pay a disproportionate amount per pupil compared to Haledon and Prospect Park. North Haledon has also attempted to withdraw from the district, which would drastically increase the tax rate on the two smaller municipalities."
  68. ^ Staff. "Diversity ruling halts school maneuver, Justices said a borough's money-saving bid to leave a district would remove too many white students.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 12, 2004. Accessed May 1, 2011. "The state Supreme Court ruled yesterday that a Passaic County school district cannot withdraw its students from a regional high school because it would take away too many white students, resulting in a racially imbalanced enrollment. The 6-0 decision said North Haledon students must continue to attend Manchester Regional High School in Haledon because the state constitution requires education officials to prevent segregation in public schools."
  69. ^ Interdistrict Public School Choice: Approved Choice Districts, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 1, 2011.
  70. ^ School Profile, Passaic County Technical Institute. Accessed August 7, 2013.

External links[edit]