Prospection

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Prospection refers broadly to the generation and evaluation of mental representations of possible futures. This ability fundamentally shapes human cognition, emotion, and motivation, and yet remains an understudied field of research.[1][2] For too long, science has concentrated on how the past determines the present and the future; Prospective Psychology seek to change this by moving prospection to the center of research on human action.[3][4]

Martin Seligman played a leading role in starting the Positive Psychology movement, but noticed a deeper flaw in psychology: seeing humans as driven by the past.[5] Thus, Seligman and others are leading an initiative to start on the study of prospective psychology, which is open to not only psychologists and neuroscientists, but also philosophers. Peter Railton, Roy F. Baumeister, and Chandra Sripada also lead the prospective psychology research movement.[6][7]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Authentic Happiness: Prospective Psychology". University of Pennsylvania. 
  2. ^ Seligman, M. E. P.; Railton, P.; Baumeister, R. F.; Sripada, C. (27 February 2013). "Navigating Into the Future or Driven by the Past". Perspectives on Psychological Science 8 (2): 119–141. doi:10.1177/1745691612474317. 
  3. ^ "Prospective Psychology". University of Pennsylvania. 
  4. ^ "Navigating into the Future or Driven by the Past". 
  5. ^ "Prospecting the Future". Youtube. 
  6. ^ "Prospective Psychology". University of Pennsylvania. 
  7. ^ Seligman, M. E. P.; Railton, P.; Baumeister, R. F.; Sripada, C. (27 February 2013). "Navigating Into the Future or Driven by the Past". Perspectives on Psychological Science 8 (2): 119–141. doi:10.1177/1745691612474317.