Protection of Diplomats Convention

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Protection of Diplomats Convention
Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes against Internationally Protected Persons, including Diplomatic Agents
Type anti-terrorism, international criminal law, privileges and immunities; diplomatic relations
Drafted 14 December 1973
Signed 28 December 1973[1]
Location New York, United States
Effective 20 February 1977
Condition 22 ratifications
Signatories 25
Parties 177
Depositary United Nations Secretary-General
Languages Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish

The Protection of Diplomats Convention (formally, the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes against Internationally Protected Persons, including Diplomatic Agents) is a United Nations anti-terrorism treaty that codifies some of the traditional principles on the necessity of protecting diplomats.

Adoption[edit]

The convention was adopted as a resolution of the United Nations General Assembly on 14 December 1973 in response to a series of kidnappings and murders of diplomatic agents, beginning in the 1960s. It was drafted by the International Law Commission, which began work on it in 1971.

Content[edit]

Parties to the convention agree to criminalise the commission of murders or kidnappings of internationally protected persons as well as violent attacks against the official premises, private accommodation, or means of transport of such persons. Parties to the convention also agree to criminalise the attempted commission or threatened commission of such acts. "Internationally protected persons" is a term created by the convention, and refers explicitly to heads of state, heads of government, foreign ministers, ambassadors, other official diplomats, and members of their families.

A central provision of the convention is the principle of aut dedere aut judicare—that a party to the treaty must either (1) prosecute a person who commits an offence against an internationally protection person or (2) send the person to another state that requests his or her extradition for prosecution of the same crime.

Ratifications and parties[edit]

By the end of 1974, the convention had been signed by 25 states and it came into force on 20 February 1977 after it had been ratified by 22 states. As of December 2014, it has been ratified by 177 state parties, which includes 175 United Nations member states plus Niue and the Holy See. The UN member states that have not ratified the convention are:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ First signed by the United States.

References[edit]

  • A. B. Green, "Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes Against Diplomatic Agents and Other Internationally Protected Persons: An Analysis", Virginia Journal of International Law, vol. 14 (1973–1974) pp. 703–728.
  • F. Przetacznik, "Convention on the prevention and punishment of crimes against internationally protected persons", Revue de droit international, de sciences diplomatiques et politiques, vol. 52 (1974) pp. 208–247.
  • M. C. Wood, "The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes against Internationally Protected Persons, including Diplomatic Agents", International and Comparative Law Quarterly, vol. 23 (1974) pp.791–817

External links[edit]