Provinces of Indonesia

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Indonesian territory is composed of 34 provinces. A province (Indonesian: provinsi) is the highest tier of the local government divisions of Indonesia (Daerah Tingkat I - level I region). Provinces are further divided into regencies and cities (Daerah Tingkat II - level II regions), which are in turn subdivided into districts (kecamatan).

Background[edit]

Each province has its own local government, headed by a governor, and has its own legislative body. The governor and members of local representative bodies are elected by popular vote for five-year terms.

Current provinces[edit]

Indonesia has 34 provinces, eight of which have been created since 1999, namely: North Maluku, West Papua, Banten, Bangka–Belitung Islands, Gorontalo, Riau Islands Province, West Sulawesi and[citation needed] (in late 2012) North Kalimantan.

Five provinces have special status:

  • Aceh, for the use of the Sharia law as the regional law of the province.
  • Special Region of Yogyakarta, a sovereign monarchy within Indonesia with the sultan Hamengkubuwono as hereditary Governor and Paduka Sri Pakualam as hereditary vice-governor. SR Yogyakarta refused to call themselves as the province according to Law No. 12/2012 about The Speciality of Special Region of Yogyakarta.
  • Papua, for implementation of sustainable development.
  • West Papua, for granting implementation of sustainable development.
  • Special Capital Region of Jakarta.

The provinces are officially grouped into seven geographical units.[1]

This clickable map shows province of Indonesia as of 25 October 2012. Click on a province name to go to its main article.

Table of Provinces[edit]

Provinces of Indonesia[2]
Seal Province ISO[3] Capital Population at 2010 Census Area (km²) Population density
per km²
(2010)
Geographical unit Number of Municipalities (kotamadya) Number of Regencies (kabupaten) Number of Districts (kecamatan) Villages (kelurahan)
Aceh COA.svg Special Region of Aceh ID-AC Banda Aceh 4,494,410 57,956 77 Sumatra 5 18 275 6,420
Bali COA.svg Bali ID-BA Denpasar 3,890,757 5,780 621 Lesser Sunda Islands 1 8 57 698
Bangka Belitung Emblem.svg Bangka–Belitung Islands ID-BB Pangkal Pinang 1,223,296 16,424 64 Sumatra 1 6 43 361
Banten coa.png Banten ID-BT Serang 10,632,166 9,662 909 Java 4 4 154 1,530
Bengkulu coa.png Bengkulu ID-BE Bengkulu 1,715,518 19,919 84 Sumatra 1 9 116 1,442
Central Java COA.svg Central Java ID-JT Semarang 32,382,657 40,800 894 Java 6 29 573 8,577
Central Kalimantan coa.png Central Kalimantan ID-KT Palangkaraya 2,212,089 153,564 14 Kalimantan 1 13 120 1,439
Central Sulawesi coa.png Central Sulawesi ID-ST Palu 2,635,009 61,841 41 Sulawesi 1 10 147 1,712
Coat of arms of East Java.svg East Java ID-JI Surabaya 37,476,757 47,799 828 Java 9 29 662 8,502
East kalimantan coa.png East Kalimantan[4] ID-KI Samarinda 3,026,060 139,462 22 Kalimantan 3 6 89 1,023
East Nusa Tenggara COA.svg East Nusa Tenggara ID-NT Kupang 4,683,827 48,718 92 Lesser Sunda Islands 1 20 286 2,775
Lambang propinsi gorontalo.jpg Gorontalo ID-GO Gorontalo 1,040,164 11,257 94 Sulawesi 1 5 65 595
Jakarta COA.svg Jakarta (Special Capital Region) ID-JK Jakarta 9,607,787 664 12,786 Java 5 1 44 267
Jambi symbol.jpg Jambi ID-JA Jambi 3,092,265 50,058 57 Sumatra 2 9 128 1,319
Lampung coa.png Lampung ID-LA Bandar Lampung 7,608,405 34,623 226 Sumatra 2 12 206 2,358
Maluku coa.png Maluku ID-MA Ambon 1,533,506 46,914 32 Maluku Islands 2 9 76 898
Emblem of North Kalimantan.png North Kalimantan ID-KU Tanjung Selor 622,350 71,176 10 Kalimantan 1 4 47 381
North Maluku coa.png North Maluku ID-MU Sofifi 1,038,087 31,982 31 Maluku Islands 2 7 109 1,041
North Sulawesi Emblem.svg North Sulawesi ID-SA Manado 2,270,596 13,851 162 Sulawesi 4 11 150 1,510
North Sumatra coa.png North Sumatra ID-SU Medan 12,982,204 72,981 188 Sumatra 8 25 408 5,649
Papua COA.svg Special Region of Papua ID-PA Jayapura 2,833,381 319,036 8 Western New Guinea 1 28 330 3,583
Riau COA.svg Riau ID-RI Pekanbaru 5,538,367 87,023 52 Sumatra 2 10 153 1,500
Lambang Riau Kepulauan.jpeg Riau Islands Province ID-KR Tanjung Pinang 1,679,163 8,201 208 Sumatra 2 5 59 331
Southeast Sulawesi COA.svg Southeast Sulawesi ID-SG Kendari 2,232,586 38,067 51 Sulawesi 2 10 199 1,843
South Kalimantan coa.jpg South Kalimantan ID-KS Banjarmasin 3,626,616 38,744 96 Kalimantan 2 11 151 1,973
South Sulawesi coa.png South Sulawesi ID-SN Makassar 8,034,776 46,717 151 Sulawesi 3 26 301 2,874
South Sumatra COA.svg South Sumatra ID-SS Palembang 7,450,394 91,592 86 Sumatra 4 11 217 2,869
West Java coa.png West Java ID-JB Bandung 43,053,732 35,377 1176 Java 9 17 625 5,827
West Kalimantan Emblem.svg West Kalimantan ID-KB Pontianak 4,395,983 147,307 30 Kalimantan 2 12 175 1,777
West Nusa Tenggara coa.png West Nusa Tenggara ID-NB Mataram 4,500,212 18,572 234 Lesser Sunda Islands 2 8 116 913
West Papua Province Emblem.svg Special Region of West Papua ID-PB[5] Manokwari 760,422 97,024 8 Western New Guinea 1 10 149 1,291
West Sulawesi coa.png West Sulawesi ID-SR Mamuju 1,158,651 16,787 73 Sulawesi 0 5 66 564
West Sumatra coa.svg West Sumatra ID-SB Padang 5,133,989 42,012 110 Sumatra 7 12 169 964
Yogyakarta COA.svg Special Region of Yogyakarta ID-YO Yogyakarta 3,457,491 3,133 1,138 Java 1 4 78 438

Proposed future provinces[edit]

A considerable number of new provinces have been proposed in addition to the 34 existing provinces of Indonesia.[6] As of 2013, the government has targeted the creation of eight new provinces by 2020,[7] by splitting several of the existing provinces.

Region English name of proposed new province Indonesian name of proposed new province Source province (currently containing this area)
Sumatra Tapanuli Tapanuli North Sumatra
Sumatra Nias Islands Kepulauan Nias North Sumatra
Lesser Sunda Islands Sumbawa Island[8] Pulau Sumbawa West Nusa Tenggara
Papua Central Papua[9][10] Papua Tengah Papua
Papua Southwest Papua[11] Papua Barat Daya Papua
Papua South Papua[12] Papua Selatan Papua

On 25 October 2013, the Indonesian House of Representatives (DPR) began reviewing draft laws on the establishment of 57 prospective regencies and 8 new provinces. Besides Tapanuli, Kepulauan Nias, Pulau Sumbawa, Papua Tengah (Central Papua), Papua Barat Daya (Southwest Papua) and Papua Selatan (South Papua) - the six areas mentioned above - the proposed new provinces also include Kapuas Raya, to comprise the five most easterly regencies of the present West Kalimantan province, and Bolaang Mongondow Raya, to comprise the southern half of the present North Sulawesi province. In the same week, the House, at its last plenary meeting of the year, approved the creation of seven new regencies - Mahakam Ulu (East Kalimantan), Malaka (East Nusa Tenggara), Central Mamuju (West Sulawesi), Banggai Laut (Central Sulawesi), Tailabu Island (North Maluku), Penukal Abab Lematang Ilir (South Sumatra) and East Kolaka Timur (Southeast Sulawesi).[13]

In addition, a variety of other new provinces (or province-level administrations) have been proposed:

Region English name Indonesian name Source province
Sumatra Central Sumatra (Provinsi) Sumatera Tengah Riau
The Moluccas South Maluku (Province) (Provinsi) Maluku Selatan Maluku
Java Special Capital Region of Jonggol Daerah Khusus Ibukota Jonggol West Java
Java Madura Islands (Province) (Provinsi) Kepulauan Madura East Java
Borneo Special Region of Singkawang Daerah Istimewah Singkawang West Kalimantan
Borneo Southeast Kalimantan (Province) (Provinsi) Kalimantan Tenggara East Kalimantan
Sumatra Belitung (Province) (Provinsi) Belitung Bangka-Belitung Islands
Java Special Region of Surakarta Daerah Istimewah Surakarta Central Java
Celebes Miangas Islands (Province) (Provinsi) Kepulauan Miangas North Sulawesi
Celebes East Sulawesi (Province) (Provinsi) Sulawesi Timur Central Sulawesi

See also[edit]

General:

References[edit]

  1. ^ ISO 3166-2:ID
  2. ^ Data Wilayah - Kementerian Dalam Negeri - Republik Indonesia
  3. ^ ISO 3166-2:ID (ISO 3166-2 codes for the provinces of Indonesia)
  4. ^ figures adjusted to take account of the separation of Tarakan City and four regencies, as confirmed by Biro Pusat Statistik, to form the new province of North Kalimantan, listed separately in this table.
  5. ^ West Papua was created from the western portion of Papua province in February, 2003, initially under the name of Irian Jaya Barat, and was renamed Papua Barat (West Papua) on 2007-02-07. The split remains controversial. In November 2004, an Indonesian court agreed that the split violated Papua's autonomy laws. However, the court ruled that because the new province had already been created, it should remain separate from Papua. The ruling also prohibited the creation of another proposed province, Central Irian Jaya, because the split was not yet completed. As of June, 2008, an ISO 3166-2 code has not yet been published for West Papua. If one were to follow precedent, it would be ID-PB. Note: ISO 3166-2 Newsletter II-1 (corrected 2010-02-19) page 18-19 confirms this as ID-PB. see http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_3166-2_newsletter_ii-1_corrected_2010-02-19.pdf . The code ID-IJ now refers to the larger geographical region including Papua and West Papua.
  6. ^ jakartapost.com/news/2012/04/20/how-many-provinces-does-indonesia-need.html How many provinces does Indonesia need? | The Jakarta Post
  7. ^ Jakarta Post, 14 November 2013
  8. ^ jakartapost.com/news/2011/03/01/officials-support-new-province-sumbawa.html Officials support new province for Sumbawa.|The Jakarta Post
  9. ^ SBY to discuss formation of new Central Papua province | The Jakarta Post
  10. ^ West Papua: Military report confirms desire for freedom | asia-pacific-action.org
  11. ^ jakartapost.com/news/2012/06/28/better-public-services-not-new-provinces-papua-activists.html Better public services, not new provinces for Papua: Activists | The Jakarta Post
  12. ^ papuan province.html House backs new Papuan province|The Jakarta Post
  13. ^ Jakarta Post, 14 November 2013

External links[edit]