Pseudocrenilabrinae

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pseudocrenilabrinae
Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor.jpg
Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Cichlidae
Subfamily: Pseudocrenilabrinae
Fowler, 1935
Tribes

Chromidotilapiini
Cyprichromini
Ectodini
Haplochromini
Hemichromini
Lamprologini
Limnochromini
Tilapiini
Tropheini
Tylochromini
and see text

The Pseudocrenilabrinae are a subfamily in the cichlid family of fishes to which, according to a study from 2004, includes all the Middle Eastern and African cichlids with the exception of the unusual Heterochromis multidens and the Malagasy species.[1] Previous authors recognized additional African subfamilies, e.g. the Tilapiinae of Hoedeman (1947), Tylochrominae of Poll (1986), Heterochrominae of Kullander (1998) or Boulengerochrominae of Tawil (2001).

To this family belong the cichlids of the greater East African lakes like the Mbuna in the Lake Malawi, and various species from Lake Victoria and Lake Tanganyika.

The Pseudocrenilabrinae tribes Haplochromini and Tilapiini are widespread in Africa; the others are more localized, particularly in the East African Rift lakes.

Systematics[edit]

Apart from the tribes mentioned in the box to the right, Bathybatini, Benthochromini, Boulengerochromini, Cyphotilapiini, Eretmodini, Greenwoodochromini, Limnochromini and Perissodini are sometimes also recognized. The extinct genus Mahengechromis and the enigmatic living species Etia nguti are apparently quite singluar Pseudocrenilabrinae, distinct from any of the established tribes.

Genera[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sparks & Smith (2004). Phylogeny and biogeography of cichlid fishes (Teleostei: Perciformes: Cichlidae). Cladistics 20(6): 501–517
  • I. P. Farias, G. Orti, A. Meyer: Total Evidence: Molecules, Morphology, and the Phylogenetics of Cichlid Fishes, Journal of Experimental Zoology (Mol Dev Evol) 288:76–92 (2000) PDF
  • "Cichlidae". FishBase. Ed. Ranier Froese and Daniel Pauly. Nov 2006 version. N.p.: FishBase, 2006. [1]