Pseudohyperaldosteronism

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Pseudohyperaldosteronism
Classification and external resources
DiseasesDB 7471

Pseudohyperaldosteronism (also pseudoaldosteronism) is a medical condition that mimics hyperaldosteronism.[1] Like hyperaldosteronism, it produces hypertension associated with low plasma renin activity, and metabolic alkalosis associated with hypokalemia. Unlike hyperaldosteronism, it involves aldosterone levels that are normal or low (hypoaldosteronism).

Causes[edit]

This condition has several known causes, dietary and genetic. Dietary causes include the chronic excessive ingestion of licorice.[2] Licorice inhibits the 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (Protein:HSD11B2) enzyme resulting in inappropriate stimulation of the mineralocorticoid receptor by cortisol.

Genetic causes include Liddle's syndrome.[3]

Presentation[edit]

This condition is characterized by hypertension, kaliuresis and reduced plasma renin.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Armanini D, Calò L, Semplicini A (June 2003). "Pseudohyperaldosteronism: pathogenetic mechanisms". Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci 40 (3): 295–335. doi:10.1080/713609355. PMID 12892318. 
  2. ^ Sigurjonsdottir HA, Axelson M, Johannsson G, Manhem K, Nyström E, Wallerstedt S (2006). "The liquorice effect on the RAAS differs between the genders". Blood Press. 15 (3): 169–72. doi:10.1080/08037050600593060. PMID 16864159. 
  3. ^ Takeuchi K, Abe K, Sato M, et al. (February 1989). "Plasma aldosterone level in a female case of pseudohyperaldosteronism (Liddle's syndrome)". Endocrinol. Jpn. 36 (1): 167–73. doi:10.1507/endocrj1954.36.167. PMID 2659310.