Public computer

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A public computer (or public access computer) is any of various computers available in public areas. Some places where public computers may be available are libraries, schools, or facilities run by government.

Public computers share similar hardware and software components to personal computers, however, the role and function of a public access computer is entirely different. A public access computer is used by many different untrusted individuals throughout the course of the day. The computer must be locked down and secure against both intentional and unintentional abuse. Users typically don't have authority to install software or change settings. A personal computer, in contrast, is typically used by a single responsible user, who can customize the machine's behavior to their preferences.

Public access computers are often provided with tools such as a PC reservation system to regulate access.

The world's first public access computer center was the Marin Computer Center in California, co-founded by David and Annie Fox in 1977.[1]

Public computers in the United States[edit]

Library computers[edit]

In the United States and Canada, almost all public libraries have computers available for the use of patrons, though some libraries will keep users timed to allow others to get turns and keep the library less busy. Users are often allowed to print documents that they have created using these computers, though sometimes for a small fee. When using these computers, it is a smart idea to bring a USB flash drive for digital note-taking or taking files home if the need arises.

School computers[edit]

The U.S. government has given money to many school boards to purchase computers for educational applications. There is usually Internet access on these machines, but some schools will put up a blocking service to limit the websites that students are able to access to only include educational resources, such as Wikipedia or Google. In addition to controlling the content students are viewing, putting up these blocks can also help to keep the computers safe by preventing students from downloading malware and other threats. However, the effectiveness of such content filtering systems is questionable since it can easily be circumvented by using proxy websites, Virtual Private Networks and for some weak security systems merely knowing the IP address of the intended website is enough to go through.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox, David (2007-08-18), About Us, retrieved 2008-04-19