Pulaski County, Virginia

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Pulaski County, Virginia
Pulaski County Courthouse.JPG
Pulaski County Courthouse
Seal of Pulaski County, Virginia
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Pulaski County
Location in the state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1839
Named for Casimir Pulaski
Seat Pulaski
Largest town Pulaski
Area
 • Total 330 sq mi (855 km2)
 • Land 320 sq mi (829 km2)
 • Water 10 sq mi (26 km2), 3.0%
Population
 • (2010) 34,872
 • Density 109/sq mi (42/km²)
Congressional district 9th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.pulaskicounty.org

Pulaski County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 34,872.[1] Its county seat is Pulaski.[2]

Pulaski County is part of the BlacksburgChristiansburgRadford, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Pulaski County was formed on March 30, 1839 from parts of Montgomery and Wythe counties, becoming the 87th county of the Commonwealth of Virginia. It was named for Count Casimir Pulaski, who fought during the American Revolution as part of George Washington's army. Pulaski had been a nobleman in Poland, but had been exiled. He joined the army in 1777 and became a brigadier general and chief of cavalry in the Continental Army. He was fatally wounded at Savannah and died on October 11, 1779.[3] Casimir Pulaski is one of the most honored American heroes in terms of places and events named in his honor.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 330 square miles (850 km2), of which 320 square miles (830 km2) is land and 10 square miles (26 km2) (3.0%) is water.

Pulaski County is the site of Claytor Lake State Park, which is located on Claytor Lake, a 4,500-acre (18 km2), 21-mile (34 km) long man made lake on the New River created for a hydroelectric project of Appalachian Power Company. It is named for W. Graham Claytor, Sr. (1886–1971) of Roanoke, Virginia, a vice president of Appalachian Power who supervised construction of the dam and creation of the lake.

Adjacent counties / Independent city[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 3,739
1850 5,118 36.9%
1860 5,416 5.8%
1870 6,538 20.7%
1880 8,755 33.9%
1890 12,790 46.1%
1900 14,609 14.2%
1910 17,246 18.1%
1920 17,111 −0.8%
1930 20,566 20.2%
1940 22,767 10.7%
1950 27,758 21.9%
1960 27,258 −1.8%
1970 29,564 8.5%
1980 35,229 19.2%
1990 34,496 −2.1%
2000 35,127 1.8%
2010 34,872 −0.7%
Est. 2013 34,507 −1.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1790-1960[5] 1900-1990[6]
1990-2000[7] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 35,127 people, 14,643 households, and 10,147 families residing in the county. The population density was 110 people per square mile (42/km²). There were 16,325 housing units at an average density of 51 per square mile (20/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.60% White, 5.57% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.37% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. 0.96% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 14,643 households out of which 26.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.90% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.70% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.80.

In the county, the population was spread out with 20.60% under the age of 18, 7.30% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 27.70% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,873, and the median income for a family was $42,251. Males had a median income of $30,712 versus $21,596 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,973. About 10.60% of families and 13.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.90% of those under age 18 and 11.50% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ History of Pulaski County (PDF)
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°04′N 80°43′W / 37.06°N 80.71°W / 37.06; -80.71