Punjabi folklore

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Punjabi folklore, more particularly its folksongs, is said to be the autobiography of its people.[1]

Folklore is the body of expressive culture, including tales, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, and so forth within a particular population comprising the traditions (including oral traditions) of that culture, subculture, or group. It is also the set of practices through which those expressive genres are shared. The academic and usually ethnographic study of folklore is sometimes called folkloristics.

List of Punjabi folklore[edit]

  • The Advantures of raja Rasalu- (Punjabi:ਰਾਜਾ ਰਸਾਲੂ)
  • The Chronicles of the Nang
  • Sakhi Sarwar and Dani Jatti
  • Dhanna Bhagat
  • Sarwar
  • The Marriage of Ghazi Salar
  • The Legend of Guru Gugga[2]
  • The Ballad Ofg Isa Baniya
  • The Ballad of Isa Bapari
  • Princess Adhik Anup Dai
  • The Legend of Sila Dai
  • The Story of Raja Mahi Parkash of Sarmor
  • The Story of Syama, Lord of Sohini
  • The Song of Negi Bahadur
  • Madana the Brave, Lord of Chaura
  • The Legend of Safidon
  • Princess Niwal Dai
  • The Genealogies of Lal Beg
  • The Legend of Raja Gopi Chand
  • The Story of Raja Chandarbhan and Rani Chand Karan
  • Songs About Namdev
  • Sakhi Sarwar and Jati
  • The Marriage of Sakhi Sarwar
  • The Ballad of Chuhar Singh
  • Sansar Chand of Kangra and Fatteh Parkash of Sarmor
  • Raja Jagat Singh of Nurpur
  • Hyms to Abdu Iiah Shah of Samin
  • The Story of Raja Jagdeo
  • Raja Nal
  • The Legend of Raja Jagdeo
  • Raja Nal
  • The Legend of Raja Dhol
  • Raja Rattan Sin of Chhittaur
  • Sarwan and Farjian
  • Puran Bhagat
  • The Adventures of Mir Chakur
  • Ismail Khan S Grandmother
  • The Bracelet-Maker of Jhang
  • Heer Ranjha
  • Mirza Sahiba
  • Sohni Mahiwal
  • Sassi Punnun
  • Sucha Singh Soorma
  • Jeona Maur
  • Shirin Farhad
  • Loona
  • Kehar Singh Ram Kaur
  • Sham Kaur/sham Singh/sham Lal
  • Dhol Sammi
  • Yusuf and Zulaikha
  • Kaulan
  • Dulla Bhatti
  • Manu Guggu
  • Ustaad Harman

References[edit]

  1. ^ Temple, Richard C. (1884) The Legends of the Panjab. Bombay: Education Society's Press, [1884-1900] (Reissued with an introduction by Kartar Singh Duggal: Rupa and Company)
  2. ^ legends of the Panjab, Part 1 By R. C. Temple, Page121

External links[edit]