Pushkinskaya Square

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For other uses, see Pushkinsky.
Churches represented on this vintage photo have since been destroyed, with an exception of Nativity Church at Putinki

Pushkinskaya Square or Pushkin Square (Russian: Пу́шкинская пло́щадь) in the Tverskoy District of central Moscow. It was historically known as Strastnaya Square, and renamed for Alexander Pushkin in 1937.

It is located at the junction of the Boulevard Ring (Tverskoy Boulevard to the southwest and Strastnoy Boulevard to the northeast) and Tverskaya Street, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) northwest of the Kremlin. It is not only one of the busiest city squares in Moscow, but also one of the busiest in the world.

The former Strastnaya Square name originates from the Passion Monastery (Russian: Страстной монастырь, Strastnoy Monastery), which was demolished in the 1930s.

At the center of the square is a famous statue of Pushkin, funded by public subscription and opened by Ivan Turgenev and Fyodor Dostoyevsky in 1880. In 1950, Joseph Stalin had the statue moved to the other side of the Tverskaya Street, where the Monastery of Christ's Passions had formerly stood.

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Coordinates: 55°45′56″N 37°36′21″E / 55.76556°N 37.60583°E / 55.76556; 37.60583