Pythagoreio

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Pythagoreio
Πυθαγόρειο
Panorama of Pythagoreio.
Panorama of Pythagoreio.
Location
Pythagoreio is located in Greece
Pythagoreio
Pythagoreio
Coordinates 37°42′N 26°57′E / 37.700°N 26.950°E / 37.700; 26.950Coordinates: 37°42′N 26°57′E / 37.700°N 26.950°E / 37.700; 26.950
Government
Country: Greece
Administrative region: North Aegean
Regional unit: Samos
Municipality: Samos
Population statistics (as of 2001)[1]
Municipal unit
 - Population: 9,003
 - Area: 164.7 km2 (64 sq mi)
 - Density: 55 /km2 (142 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Auto: ΜΟ
View of the harbour

Pythagoreio or Pythagoreion and Pythagorion (Greek: Πυθαγόρειο) is a small town and former municipality on the island of Samos, North Aegean, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform, it is part of the municipality Samos, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] Population 9,003 (2001). It is the largest municipal unit in land area on Samos, at 164.662 km2 (63.576 sq mi). It shares the island with the municipal units of Vathy, Karlovasi, and Marathokampos. The town has designated a joint UNESCO World Heritage Site with nearby Heraion.[3]

The seat of the municipality was the town of Pythagoreio, formerly known as Tigani. The town was renamed in 1955 to honour the locally born mathematician and philosopher Pythagoras. The port of the town is considered to be the oldest man-made port of the Mediterranean Sea.[4]

History[edit]

Pythagoreio is built on the ancient city of Samos. Some ruins of the ancient city are today incorporated in modern houses of Pythagoreio. The ancient city reached affluence around 530 B.C. under Polycrates tyrant. At that time Samos became a powerful nautical state.[5] This power led to richness and prosperity, which is evident from great works of the period, such as the great aqueduct (part of it is the Tunnel of Eupalinos), temple of Heraion, and Samos harbour. Today many of these works can be seen in the modern town and nearby area. The ancient fortification also remains.

Samos was conquered by Persians and declined for a while. Samos flourished again for two short periods: First during the 3rd century under Ptolemy's rule (when lived Aristarchus), and second under Roman rule. The ruins of Roman period are visible today, about half a kilometre west of Pythagoreio. The harbour of Samos remained important during Byzantine period. Ruins of the Byzantine period are visible in the area of Logothetis' Tower on the west side of the harbour.[6]

Samos totally declined during Frangokratia, when the coastal settlements depopulated. In the later Ottoman period the centre of the island was Chora, built inland, 4 Km northwest of Pythagoreion. During Greek War of Independence the Samian Leader Lykourgos Logothetis built a tower in Pythagorion between 1824 and 1827.[6] In 1831 Logothetis built a church near the tower. Between 1859 and 1866 the new harbour was built in the same place as the ancient harbour,[7] after which the settlement started to develop. The name of new settlement was originally Tigani, but in 1955 renamed to Pythagoreio after the name of famous ancient Greek Mathematician and Philosopher from Samos Pythagoras.

UNESCO World Heritage Site
Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos
Name as inscribed on the World Heritage List
Samos 070 2009.JPG
Type Cultural
Criteria ii, iii
Reference 595
UNESCO region Europe and North America
Inscription history
Inscription 1992 (16th Session)

Historical population[edit]

Census Settlement Community Municipal unit
1991 1,405
2001 1,327 1,642 9,003
2011 1,272 1,500 7,996

Tourism and places of interest[edit]

Pythagoreio is one of the most toured places of Samos since it has many archaeological sites as well as a big sandy beach. The most important sights in Pythagoreio and the nearby area are:

  • Tunnel of Eupalinos: It’s about the most famous sight of Samos. The Tunnel of Eupalinos, 1036 meters long, was part of an ancient aqueduct. It is located about 2 Km northwest of Pythagoreion.
  • Heraion of Samos: a very important archaeological site, with sanctuaries dedicated to Hera. It is located about 4 Km west of Pythagoreio and, along with Pythagoreio, has been designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.
  • Harbour of ancient Samos: The ancient harbour is located in the same place as the new harbour. Some ruins are visible today. The ancient harbour is referred to by Herodotus, who described it as a great work of Polycrates' period for mostly martial use.[8]
  • Ancient theatre: a theatre of Roman period. It has been renovated and it is used for the local cultural festivals.[9]

Famous people[edit]

Statue of Pythagoras, located at the harbour

See also[edit]

  • Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos, for the Unesco Word Heritage site Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos in Pythagoreio
  • Coming Forth by Day by Gabriel Levin, a book of poems written while sojourning on Pythagorio. Carcanet Press Ltd., Great Britain, 2014

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ De Facto Population of Greece Population and Housing Census of March 18th, 2001 (PDF 793 KB). National Statistical Service of Greece. 2003. 
  2. ^ Kallikratis law Greece Ministry of Interior (Greek)
  3. ^ "Pythagoreion and Heraion". unesco.org. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  4. ^ http://www.pythagorion.net/villages/pythagorio.htm - The Official Website of the Municipality of Pythagorio. Retrieved 2008-07-28.
  5. ^ "Samos". odysseus.culture.gr. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  6. ^ a b "Αρχαιολογικός Χώρος Κάστρου Πυθαγορείου". odysseus.culture.gr. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  7. ^ "Η Σάμος και το Πυθαγόρειο". polykratisvolley.gr. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  8. ^ "Ο «κλειστός» πολεμικός λιμένας Αρχαίας πόλεως Σάμου". yppo.gr. Retrieved 9 December 2014. 
  9. ^ "Θέατρο αρχαίας πόλης Σάμου". diazoma.gr. Retrieved 9 December 2014. 
  10. ^ a b http://www.pythagorion.net/start.htm - The Official Website of the Municipality of Pythagorio. Retrieved 2008-07-28.

External links[edit]