Québécois people

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Quebecers
French: Québécois
Languages
French (Official, Majority) · English (Minority)
Religion
Roman Catholicism · Protestantism · Others

Quebecers or Quebeckers[1][2][3] (French: Québécois) are terms that are sometimes used to refer to people living in the province of Quebec in Canada,[4] though such is not the only definition of Québécois. This identification can be used by some Francophone people of Quebec to refer to themselves.[5] A majority in the Canadian House of Commons in 2006 approved a motion tabled by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, which stated that the Québécois are a nation within a united Canada.[6] Harper later elaborated that the motion's definition of Québécois relies on personal decisions to self-identify as Québécois, and therefore is a personal choice.[7] Self-identification as Québécois became dominant in the 1960s; prior to this, the Francophone people of Quebec identified themselves as French Canadians.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Quebec's voters will decide tuition conflict; Education Minister Michelle Courchesne (with video)". [dead link]
  2. ^ Andy Radia (1 August 2012). "It’s official: Quebecers are going to the polls September 4". Retrieved 2014-06-18. 
  3. ^ "With Canada's four medals all won by Quebeckers, Parti Quebecois leader says province could shine as independent country". The Globe and Mail (Toronto). 2012-07-31. 
  4. ^ Michael M. Brescia, John C. Super. North America: an introduction. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2009. Pp. 72.
  5. ^ Berch Berberoglu. The national question: nationalism, ethnic conflict, and self-determination in the 20th century. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: Temple University Press, 2995. Pp. 208.
  6. ^ Michael M. Brescia, John C. Super. North America: an introduction. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2009. Pp. 72.
  7. ^ "Who's a Québécois? Harper isn't sure". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 2006-12-19. Archived from the original on 2007-01-26. Retrieved 2014-06-18. 
  8. ^ Berch Berberoglu. And they still do to this day The national question: nationalism, ethnic conflict, and self-determination in the 20th century. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: Temple University Press, 2995. Pp. 208.