Quatama / Northwest 205th Avenue (MAX station)

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Quatama/Northwest 205th Avenue
MAX light rail station
MAX Quatama station.jpg
View from the north
Station statistics
Address 350 NW 205th Avenue
Hillsboro, OR 97006
Coordinates 45°31′23″N 122°53′19″W / 45.523127°N 122.888732°W / 45.523127; -122.888732Coordinates: 45°31′23″N 122°53′19″W / 45.523127°N 122.888732°W / 45.523127; -122.888732
Line(s) MAX Light Rail
Platforms 1 island platform
Tracks 2
Parking 310-space Park & Ride
Bicycle facilities Lockers and racks
Other information
Opened September 12, 1998
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Owned by TriMet
Services
Preceding station   TriMet logo simplified.svg MAX Light Rail   Following station
Blue Line

The Quatama/Northwest 205th Avenue station is a light rail station on the MAX Blue Line in Hillsboro, Oregon, United States. The station is the 13th stop westbound on the Westside MAX from Downtown Portland and includes a park-and-ride lot. Quatama Station is named after the area which includes Quatama Road to the south of the station. Opened in 1998, the stop is near high-tech industries and the Amberglen business park that includes Oregon Health & Science University's West Campus in Hillsboro that includes the Oregon National Primate Research Center.

History[edit]

During the planning stages of the light rail line, Hillsboro rezoned much of the area around the station to increase building densities.[1] Initial planning for a light rail line on Portland's west side began in 1979, with groundbreaking on the Westside MAX project coming in 1993.[1] On September 12, 1998, the Quatama station opened along with the Westside MAX line.[2] The area around the station was named Quatama after the former station on the Oregon Electric Railway.[3] That train stop was near the current one and was on property owned by the Oregon Nursery Company and settled in part by Hungarians.[3]

In 1998, and again in 2004, the weather vane at the station was vandalized.[4] Within several months of opening, the park-and-ride lot was at 92% capacity and by July 1999, the lot was filled to capacity during the peak travel times on the MAX line.[5][6] A fight injured a 17-year old at the station in October 2000.[7] Hillsboro planned to improve street connections to the station as part of the planned redevelopment in the south Tanasbourne area announced in 2006.[8]

The station’s platform was vandalized in a graffiti spree in June 2007 along with several surrounding developments.[9] In October of that year a 12-year old was attacked with a hammer at the station.[10] In 2008, TriMet secured a grant from the Transportation Security Administration to allow the transit agency to add security cameras to the station.[11]

Details[edit]

Designed by the architectural group OTAK Inc., the station features a single island platform between the two tracks.[12] Located on northwest Quatama Road at northwest 205th Avenue in Hillsboro, the station is served by the MAX Blue Line.[13] The station includes a park-and-ride lot, bike lockers, bike racks, has a variety of public artwork, and is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.[13] It was situated in fare zone 3 until TriMet discontinued all use of fare zones, in September 2012. The station sits on 3.35 acres (13,600 m2) on the south side of the rail line.[14] Construction of townhomes and condominiums in the area was a result of the station.[15]

Public art[edit]

Artwork at the station has a theme of understanding nature.[16] One piece of art reflecting that theme at the stop is a weather vane designed by Michael Oppenheimer.[17] The weather vane is titled “Cattail Tunes” and is based on the plant that grows in nearby wetlands.[17] Constructed of stainless steel rods, the piece is composed of five rods standing 24 feet (7.3 m) tall and six feet apart.[18] The rods are topped with metal cattail heads, each a different height so that they sway differently from each other.[18]

Continuing with the natural elements theme, the platform has animal tracks etched into the concrete while the windscreen in the passenger shelter includes a map of the watershed for the Tualatin River etched into the glass.[16] Across from the platform is a plaza entitled “Flow” which features a simulated creek in the concrete.[12] Along the creek are boulders that have scientific images engraved into them, along with a water basin that illustrates how water run-off occurs.[16] The inspiration for this artwork comes from an arrangement made by a Japanese Macaque at the Oregon National Primate Research Center across the street from the station.[12] Designers for the artwork at Quatama Station were Jerry Mayer, Valerie Otani, Bill Will, and Fernanda D'Agostino.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hamilton, Don. Creating a lifeline to guide community growth. The Oregonian, September 9, 1998.
  2. ^ Mapes, Jeff. Gore walks tight line on Clinton. The Oregonian, September 13, 1998.
  3. ^ a b Gross, Florence (October 19, 1976). "Communities: Railroad station lends name to Quatama area". The Hillsboro Argus. 
  4. ^ Olsen, Dana. Vandals damage artwork. The Oregonian, April 28, 2004.
  5. ^ Oliver, Gordon. Mixed results for MAX’s ultimate test. The Oregonian, July 13, 1999.
  6. ^ Hamilton, Don. Park-&-Ride lots use fluctuates in wake of Westside light rail. The Oregonian, November 19, 1998.
  7. ^ Frank, Ryan. Aloha teen knifed in fight at MAX station. The Oregonian, October 18, 2000.
  8. ^ Bermudez, Esmeralda. Plan highlights. The Oregonian, November 16, 2006.
  9. ^ Snell, John. Hillsboro Boys arrested in tagging spree. The Oregonian, June 27, 2007.
  10. ^ Crombie, Noelle. Public Safety. The Oregonian, October 24, 2007.
  11. ^ Eckert, Kurt. “TriMet set to add cameras and police”, The Hillsboro Argus, September 30, 2008.
  12. ^ a b c d Colby, Richard N. Tracking art plans. The Oregonian, August 3, 1995.
  13. ^ a b Quatama/NW 205th Ave MAX Station. TriMet. Retrieved on July 18, 2008.
  14. ^ Assessment & Taxation Report. Washington County. Retrieved on July 18, 2008.
  15. ^ “MAX is 10 and still on track”, The Hillsboro Argus, September 11, 2008.
  16. ^ a b c Art on Westside MAX Blue Line. TriMet. Retrieved on July 18, 2008.
  17. ^ a b Hamilton, Don. Sculptures will let riders know which way wind is blowing. The Oregonian, July 23, 1997.
  18. ^ a b Windy art. The Oregonian, July 23, 1997.

External links[edit]